91

I want the hexadecimal representation of a Data value in Swift.

Eventually I'd want to use it like this:

let data = Data(base64Encoded: "aGVsbG8gd29ybGQ=")!
print(data.hexString)
216

A simple implementation (taken from How to hash NSString with SHA1 in Swift?, with an additional option for uppercase output) would be

extension Data {
    struct HexEncodingOptions: OptionSet {
        let rawValue: Int
        static let upperCase = HexEncodingOptions(rawValue: 1 << 0)
    }

    func hexEncodedString(options: HexEncodingOptions = []) -> String {
        let format = options.contains(.upperCase) ? "%02hhX" : "%02hhx"
        return self.map { String(format: format, $0) }.joined()
    }
}

I chose a hexEncodedString(options:) method in the style of the existing method base64EncodedString(options:).

Data conforms to the Collection protocol, therefore one can use map() to map each byte to the corresponding hex string. The %02x format prints the argument in base 16, filled up to two digits with a leading zero if necessary. The hh modifier causes the argument (which is passed as an integer on the stack) to be treated as a one byte quantity. One could omit the modifier here because $0 is an unsigned number (UInt8) and no sign-extension will occur, but it does no harm leaving it in.

The result is then joined to a single string.

Example:

let data = Data([0, 1, 127, 128, 255])
// For Swift < 4.2 use:
// let data = Data(bytes: [0, 1, 127, 128, 255])
print(data.hexEncodedString()) // 00017f80ff
print(data.hexEncodedString(options: .upperCase)) // 00017F80FF

The following implementation is faster by a factor about 50 (tested with 1000 random bytes). It is inspired to RenniePet's solution and Nick Moore's solution, but takes advantage of String(unsafeUninitializedCapacity:initializingUTF8With:) which was introduced with Swift 5.3/Xcode 12 and is available on macOS 11 and iOS 14 or newer.

This method allows to create a Swift string from UTF-8 units efficiently, without unnecessary copying or reallocations.

An alternative implementation for older macOS/iOS versions is also provided.

extension Data {
    struct HexEncodingOptions: OptionSet {
        let rawValue: Int
        static let upperCase = HexEncodingOptions(rawValue: 1 << 0)
    }

    func hexEncodedString(options: HexEncodingOptions = []) -> String {
        let hexDigits = options.contains(.upperCase) ? "0123456789ABCDEF" : "0123456789abcdef"
        if #available(macOS 11.0, iOS 14.0, watchOS 7.0, tvOS 14.0, *) {
            let utf8Digits = Array(hexDigits.utf8)
            return String(unsafeUninitializedCapacity: 2 * self.count) { (ptr) -> Int in
                var p = ptr.baseAddress!
                for byte in self {
                    p[0] = utf8Digits[Int(byte / 16)]
                    p[1] = utf8Digits[Int(byte % 16)]
                    p += 2
                }
                return 2 * self.count
            }
        } else {
            let utf16Digits = Array(hexDigits.utf16)
            var chars: [unichar] = []
            chars.reserveCapacity(2 * self.count)
            for byte in self {
                chars.append(utf16Digits[Int(byte / 16)])
                chars.append(utf16Digits[Int(byte % 16)])
            }
            return String(utf16CodeUnits: chars, count: chars.count)
        }
    }
}
12
  • 1
    While I typically don't like an extension on an Apple class when a func can be used I love the symmetry with base64EncodedString.
    – zaph
    Oct 17 '16 at 15:11
  • 2
    @reza_khalafi: There are many solutions for Objective-C, for example here: stackoverflow.com/questions/1305225/….
    – Martin R
    May 11 '17 at 8:48
  • 1
    Can you also provide a reverse operation from string to Hex data
    – nkp
    Jun 1 '17 at 21:30
  • 1
    @MiladFaridnia: UTF-16 is what Swift strings use internally. The above function returns a string containing only digits 0...9 and the letters A...F, so that should not be a problem.
    – Martin R
    Mar 8 '18 at 8:48
  • 1
    Great answer Martin
    – Woodstock
    Feb 26 '20 at 14:35
30

This code extends the Data type with a computed property. It iterates through the bytes of data and concatenates the byte's hex representation to the result:

extension Data {
    var hexDescription: String {
        return reduce("") {$0 + String(format: "%02x", $1)}
    }
}
5
  • 1
    Although this code may help to solve the problem, it doesn't explain why and/or how it answers the question. Providing this additional context would significantly improve its long-term value. Please edit your answer to add explanation, including what limitations and assumptions apply. Aug 22 '16 at 13:57
  • 6
    My favorite (from stackoverflow.com/a/25762128/1187415): return map { String(format: "%02hhx", $0) }.joined()
    – Martin R
    Aug 27 '16 at 8:12
  • 1
    "For every byte, there is a string allocation and copy operation being performed." I don't think that's correct. I think Swift does a fairly good job of optimizing String manipulation. stackoverflow.com/a/36397955/253938
    – RenniePet
    Mar 14 '17 at 10:17
  • I agree with your edit, removing the warning about poor efficiency. So my above comment should be ignored, but I'll leave it there for the sake of posterity.
    – RenniePet
    Mar 15 '17 at 9:34
  • I like this approach better as I assume it takes one less pass through the collection.
    – Jereme
    Mar 31 '17 at 18:36
25

My version. It's about 10 times faster than the [original] accepted answer by Martin R.

public extension Data {
    private static let hexAlphabet = Array("0123456789abcdef".unicodeScalars)
    func hexStringEncoded() -> String {
        String(reduce(into: "".unicodeScalars) { result, value in
            result.append(Self.hexAlphabet[Int(value / 0x10)])
            result.append(Self.hexAlphabet[Int(value % 0x10)])
        })
    }
}
2
12

Swift 4 - From Data to Hex String
Based upon Martin R's solution but even a tiny bit faster.

extension Data {
  /// A hexadecimal string representation of the bytes.
  func hexEncodedString() -> String {
    let hexDigits = Array("0123456789abcdef".utf16)
    var hexChars = [UTF16.CodeUnit]()
    hexChars.reserveCapacity(count * 2)

    for byte in self {
      let (index1, index2) = Int(byte).quotientAndRemainder(dividingBy: 16)
      hexChars.append(hexDigits[index1])
      hexChars.append(hexDigits[index2])
    }

    return String(utf16CodeUnits: hexChars, count: hexChars.count)
  }
}

Swift 4 - From Hex String to Data
I've also added a fast solution for converting a hex String into Data (based on a C solution).

extension String {
  /// A data representation of the hexadecimal bytes in this string.
  func hexDecodedData() -> Data {
    // Get the UTF8 characters of this string
    let chars = Array(utf8)

    // Keep the bytes in an UInt8 array and later convert it to Data
    var bytes = [UInt8]()
    bytes.reserveCapacity(count / 2)

    // It is a lot faster to use a lookup map instead of strtoul
    let map: [UInt8] = [
      0x00, 0x01, 0x02, 0x03, 0x04, 0x05, 0x06, 0x07, // 01234567
      0x08, 0x09, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, // 89:;<=>?
      0x00, 0x0a, 0x0b, 0x0c, 0x0d, 0x0e, 0x0f, 0x00, // @ABCDEFG
      0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00  // HIJKLMNO
    ]

    // Grab two characters at a time, map them and turn it into a byte
    for i in stride(from: 0, to: count, by: 2) {
      let index1 = Int(chars[i] & 0x1F ^ 0x10)
      let index2 = Int(chars[i + 1] & 0x1F ^ 0x10)
      bytes.append(map[index1] << 4 | map[index2])
    }

    return Data(bytes)
  }
}

Note: this function does not validate the input. Make sure that it is only used for hexadecimal strings with (an even amount of) characters.

5

This doesn't really answer the OP's question since it works on a Swift byte array, not a Data object. And it's much bigger than the other answers. But it should be more efficient since it avoids using String(format: ).

Anyway, in the hopes someone finds this useful ...

public class StringMisc {

   // MARK: - Constants

   // This is used by the byteArrayToHexString() method
   private static let CHexLookup : [Character] =
      [ "0", "1", "2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9", "A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F" ]


   // Mark: - Public methods

   /// Method to convert a byte array into a string containing hex characters, without any
   /// additional formatting.
   public static func byteArrayToHexString(_ byteArray : [UInt8]) -> String {

      var stringToReturn = ""

      for oneByte in byteArray {
         let asInt = Int(oneByte)
         stringToReturn.append(StringMisc.CHexLookup[asInt >> 4])
         stringToReturn.append(StringMisc.CHexLookup[asInt & 0x0f])
      }
      return stringToReturn
   }
}

Test case:

  // Test the byteArrayToHexString() method
  let byteArray : [UInt8] = [ 0x25, 0x99, 0xf3 ]
  assert(StringMisc.byteArrayToHexString(byteArray) == "2599F3")
1
1

A bit different from other answers here:

extension DataProtocol {
    func hexEncodedString(uppercase: Bool = false) -> String {
        return self.map {
            if $0 < 16 {
                return "0" + String($0, radix: 16, uppercase: uppercase)
            } else {
                return String($0, radix: 16, uppercase: uppercase)
            }
        }.joined()
    }
}

However in my basic XCTest + measure setup this was fastest of the 4 I tried.

Going through a 1000 bytes of (the same) random data 100 times each:

Above: Time average: 0.028 seconds, relative standard deviation: 1.3%

MartinR: Time average: 0.037 seconds, relative standard deviation: 6.2%

Zyphrax: Time average: 0.032 seconds, relative standard deviation: 2.9%

NickMoore: Time average: 0.039 seconds, relative standard deviation: 2.0%

Repeating the test returned the same relative results. (Nick and Martins sometimes swapped)

0

Maybe not the fastest, but data.map({ String($0, radix: 16) }).joined() does the job. As mentioned in the comments, this solution was flawed.

1
  • 1
    That is problematic because no leading zeros are inserted for single-digit hex numbers. Example: For Data(bytes: [0x11, 0x02, 0x03, 0x44]) it returns the string "112344" instead of "11020344".
    – Martin R
    Feb 18 '19 at 7:49

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