2

When building a Windows Console App in C#, is it possible to update lines in the console while waiting for a readline?

My current code is:

do
{
    Console.Clear();
    Console.WriteLine("RA:     " + scope.RightAscension);
    Console.WriteLine("Dec:    " + scope.Declination);
    Console.WriteLine("Status: " + scope.Slewing);
    System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1000);
} while (true);
1

Yes. You can write to the Console from a separate thread while blocking on Console.ReadLine.

That being said, it's going to cause confusion. In your case, you'll clear out what the user is typing half-way through their line (via Console.Clear()), plus move the cursor position around dramatically.


Edit: Here's an example that shows this:

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    using System;
    using System.Threading;

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Starting");

            ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(
                cb =>
                    {
                        int i = 1;
                        while (true)
                        {
                            Console.WriteLine("Background {0}", i++);
                            Thread.Sleep(1000);
                        }
                    });
            Console.WriteLine("Blocking");
            Console.WriteLine("Press Enter to exit...");
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

If you run this, you'll see the Console waits on ReadLine, but the background thread still prints.

  • Can you give a code example? I am rather new to C#. I wondered if threads were the answer. – Arlen Beiler Oct 11 '10 at 15:41
  • @Arlen: Done. It's there. – Reed Copsey Oct 11 '10 at 15:43
  • What are your using statements? – Arlen Beiler Oct 11 '10 at 15:55
  • @Arlen: I changed it to .NET 2, and included a fully compilable program for you... – Reed Copsey Oct 11 '10 at 16:02
  • I accepted this answer because it gives the most detail. The reason he has almost 100K is because he gives excellent answers such as these, not vice versa. So don't worry, you can do it too. – Arlen Beiler Oct 11 '10 at 16:29
1

Use Console.KeyAvailable inside the loop. As soon as it returns true, the user started typing so call ReadLine(). It doesn't make for a very attractive user interface though. Consider Windows Forms.

0

May this solution helps you:

using System; 
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading;

namespace WaitForExit
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            new Thread(() =>
                {
                    Console.ReadLine();
                    Environment.Exit(0);
                }).Start();

            int i = 0;
            while (true)
            {
                Console.Clear();
                Console.WriteLine(++i);
                Thread.Sleep(1000);
            }
        }
    }
}    

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.