1

I have a function that returns a read-only list of values. In some cases, this list of values can grow very large and can be described by an algorithm. I would like to have the list generate those values dynamically as requested rather than generate a list with all of them. Is there anything generic or a template or anything else that can get me started should I need to implement more than the algorithm myself?

I realize the idea itself is rather generic, but I tagged it for my specific case as a starting point.

2

Since List<T> represents an in-memory collection, there is no way to generate its members dynamically without storing them in memory.

However, you can do it with an IEnumerable<T>: use a yield return statement in a loop to generate the items of a sequence dynamically:

public IEnumerable<int> RandomlyIncreasing() {
    var rnd = new Random();
    var current = rnd.Next(0, 50);
    for (int i = 0 ; i != 1000000 ; i++) {
        yield return current;
        current += rnd.Next(0, 10);
    }
}

Demo.

  • I mentioned a read-only list specifically because I was thinking of implementing my own class exposing something like IReadOnlyList<T> to do what I described. The list isn't always dynamic, often it will be an actual List<T> as you describe. I was just looking for an existing or similar solution. – Ioan Aug 22 '16 at 19:24
  • @Ioan The only built-in solution provided by the language is for IEnumerable<T>. If there is a way to replace IReadOnlyList<T> with IEnumerable<T>, you would be able to make your list dynamic with very little effort. IReadOnlyList<T>, on the other hand, is also an interface, so you should be able to build an implementation for it using the same trick, but with slightly more code. – dasblinkenlight Aug 22 '16 at 19:38
  • Right, I was hoping this was done before because it seems like it should be generic enough to apply to more than my example. – Ioan Aug 22 '16 at 19:48
  • @Ioan Doing IReadOnlyList<T> generically in the compiler is a lot trickier than implementing it for IEnumerable<T> (which is enormously complex to begin with). The task provides more questions than answers - for instance, do you store items that have been previously requested, or do you re-generate them again? How do you identify the place in the sequence to the generator? If you cache your items, do you invalidate the cache or not? You can see how quickly this becomes implementation-specific; that's probably why MS decided against adding it to the language. – dasblinkenlight Aug 22 '16 at 19:56
  • Oh sure, I know what you mean. I wasn't thinking that generic, just some template code others may have used; or at least something for algorithmically generated values. That's exactly what I'm thinking, to regenerate them on request by index (the list/set is fixed). – Ioan Aug 22 '16 at 20:21
0

As dasblinkenlight mentions, List has to hold the elements. As defined in the interfaces it implements, IList and ICollection. IEnumerable is your only choice if you want to return something that represents your value list. Check this implementation.

public class FunctionBasedList<T> : IEnumerable<T>
{
    public class Enumerator<T> : IEnumerator<T>
    {
        private int index;
        private T current;

        private FunctionBasedList<T> list;

        internal Enumerator(FunctionBasedList<T> list)
        {
            this.list = list;
        }

        public T Current {
            get
            {
                return current;
            }
        }

        Object IEnumerator.Current
        {
            get
            {
                if (index == 0 || index == this.list.Count + 1)
                {
                    throw new InvalidOperationException();
                }

                return current;
            }
        }

        public bool MoveNext()
        {
            if (list.Count > index)
            {
                current = this.list[index];
                index++;
                return true;
            }

            return false;
        }

        public void Reset()
        {
            index = 0;
            current = default(T);
        }

        public void Dispose()
        {

        }
    }

    public int Count
    {
        private set;
        get;
    }

    public Func<int, T> Function
    {
        private set;
        get;
    }

    public T this[int index]
    {
        get
        {
            if (index < 0 || index >= this.Count)
            {
                throw new IndexOutOfRangeException();
            }

            return this.Function(index);
        }
    }

    public FunctionBasedList(int count, Func<int, T> function)
    {
        this.Count = count;
        this.Function = function;
    }

    public Enumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return new Enumerator<T>(this);
    }

    IEnumerator<T> IEnumerable<T>.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return new Enumerator<T>(this);
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return new Enumerator<T>(this);
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        FunctionBasedList<int> readOnlyList = new FunctionBasedList<int>(
            10,
            (index) =>
            {
                //Arbitrary function to generate a specific value for a specific index
                return index * 100;
            });

        foreach (int r in readOnlyList)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(r);
        }

        //Loop through a subset of the list
        for (int i = 5; i < 8; i++)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(readOnlyList[i]);
        }

        //Will throw an IndexOutOfRangeException
        Console.WriteLine(readOnlyList[10]);
    }
}

You can return IEnumerator and use List<T> or FunctionBasedList<T> for different cases.

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