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Is it possible to overload constructors in C# so that the program chooses to use one constructor if the argument is of a derived class and a different if it is the base class. For instance

class BaseClass {...}
class DerivedClass : BaseClass {...}

class foo
{


      public foo(DerivedClass bar)
      {
          //do one thing
      }

      public foo(BaseClass bar)
      {
          //do another
      }

}

That is, I want the program to pick the correct constructor based on the object type.

  • 2
    This has a really bad code smell and seems like you might be trying to violate en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liskov_substitution_principle – itsme86 Aug 22 '16 at 20:38
  • You: based on the object type Do you mean the declared type of the argument (also known as the compile-time type), or the actual run-time type? The solution depends on that. The code you show already does the job if you want to "branch" based on compile-time types. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Aug 22 '16 at 21:02
1
0

I agree with everyone else that this feels like a code smell, but if you actually compile your code and run it, you'll find that it already works the way you want it to. For instance, this does exactly what you want it to do, for better or for worse.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        var b = new BaseClass();
        var d = new DerivedClass();

        var f = new foo(d);
        //prints Derived Constructor
        var e = new foo(b);
        //prints Base Constructor
    }
}

public class BaseClass {

   public BaseClass()
    {
    }
}
public class DerivedClass : BaseClass
{
    public DerivedClass()
    {
    }
}
class foo
{


    public foo(DerivedClass bar)
    {
        //do one thing
        Console.WriteLine("Derived Constructor");
    }

    public foo(BaseClass bar)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Base Constructor");
    }

}
| improve this answer | |
1
0

I think the best answer for your question is a bit indirect, but the best proximate answer to your question would be along the lines of this:

Edit: correcting incorrect is syntax usage and making it more specific

public foo(BaseClass foobar) {
     if (foobar?.GetType() == typeof(BaseClass)) {
      //do something
     }
     else { // do something different }    
}

That being said, I don't think that this is necessarily the optimum way to structure your code; making decisions based on object type can be a signal that it's time to leverage polymorphism via abstract/virtual classes and methods. You're better off IMO doing something like this:

public BaseClass {
    public virtual void DoSomething() {...}
}

public DerivedClass : BaseClass {
    public override void DoSomething() {...}
}

public foo(BaseClass foobar) {
    foobar.DoSomething();    
}
| improve this answer | |
  • the specific technique from polymorphism that I think you're looking to use is the ability to Singly Dispatch: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single_dispatch – Josh E Aug 22 '16 at 20:43
  • 1
    if (foobar is typeof(BaseClass)) is not a valid syntax, You can use if (foobar is BaseClass) but that will be true if foobar at run-time has any type the derives from BaseClass. Given the compile-time type, that would really be a null check in practice,. You can also try something like if (foobar?.GetType() == typeof(BaseClass)) which testes for an exact match. Finally, consider if (foobar is DerivedClass) or declaring a variable var dc = foobar as DerivedClass; and check whether it is null in the if statement. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Aug 22 '16 at 20:55
  • @jeppestignielsen - good observations. My main point was to guide the OP towards a more polymorphic solution; I'll update my answer with your feedback – Josh E Aug 22 '16 at 20:57
0
0

If you cast your object in your BaseClass the good constructor will be called. Like so:

void Main()
{
    var object2 = new DerivedClass();
    var temp = new Allo((BaseClass)object2);
}

public class Allo
{
    public Allo(BaseClass value)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("baseclass");
    }

    public Allo(DerivedClass value)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("derivedclass");
    }
}

public class BaseClass
{
}

public class DerivedClass : BaseClass
{
}

Output:

baseclass
| improve this answer | |
0
0

When I wrote a simple version of the program shown above, it did correctly choose the derived class-method when the constructor was called with the derived class.

[I was getting strange behavior when I tested as part of my larger project... but I realize now those were due to other errors in my code - a reminder to myself to actually test things - this is the first time in four years I've done any programming so I am forgetting the basics...].

| improve this answer | |

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