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In my application, I am listening to the keyups on a text input like this:

$('input[type="text"]').keyup(function(){

This works fine, however I also want to listen for the user pressing the UP or DOWN key anywhere in the rest of the document - so I tried adding the following (hoping jquery would use the input one inside the text box and the global one for anything else):

$(document).keyup(function(e) {

It has not done this, and chooses the global keyup for everything now. Is there any way I can get Jquery to do what I need here? I feel like it should be choosing the 'most specific' key up in each case, but it seems not...

  • How are you determining which one it is using? Because it should fire both, unless you're using stopPropagation() or preventDefault() somewhere. – Heretic Monkey Aug 22 '16 at 21:47
  • Standard event propagation goes from most nested elements in DOM to root, so those events should work or You stoped event propagation in callback. – Maciej Sikora Aug 22 '16 at 21:52
  • You guys seem to be right, testing on JSFiddle it calls both, must be something I'm doing wrong somewhere, I'm not stopping propogation though – Kevin Pione Aug 23 '16 at 20:58
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you can use this way for listening to the user when pressing the UP key anywhere from entire document elements with exception for input[type='text']

<script>
        $(document).keyup(function(e) {
           if($(e.target).is('[type="text"]')){
              return; <!-- you can handle keyup of input type text in this block -->
           } 
           else {
                <!-- handle your keyup of ducument code here -->
           }
        });
</script> 
| improve this answer | |
  • Genius! Thank you. I still don't know why my local js isn't calling both functions, but this negates the need for that. Thanks a lot! – Kevin Pione Aug 23 '16 at 20:57
  • You are welcome :) and Always remember there is no need to make complex code – Wadhah Sky Aug 24 '16 at 4:31
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It should be running both handlers, starting with the one for the more specific element. But if it's not, you can change the second handler so it doesn't overlap.

$(document).on("keyup", ":not(:text)", function(e) {
    ...
});

:text is a shorthand selector for input[type=text], and :not() excludes them in this binding.

| improve this answer | |
  • You are correct, I tried it on a JSFiddle and it ran both starting with the most specific, which makes sense. I'm not sure why it's not doing it on mine locally. Additionally, the ':not(:text)' didn't seem to work on the JSFiddle – Kevin Pione Aug 23 '16 at 20:55
  • Can you provide a link to your fiddle? – Barmar Aug 23 '16 at 20:56

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