393

According to the documentation of the == operator in MSDN,

For predefined value types, the equality operator (==) returns true if the values of its operands are equal, false otherwise. For reference types other than string, == returns true if its two operands refer to the same object. For the string type, == compares the values of the strings. User-defined value types can overload the == operator (see operator). So can user-defined reference types, although by default == behaves as described above for both predefined and user-defined reference types.

So why does this code snippet fail to compile?

bool Compare<T>(T x, T y) { return x == y; }

I get the error Operator '==' cannot be applied to operands of type 'T' and 'T'. I wonder why, since as far as I understand the == operator is predefined for all types?

Edit: Thanks, everybody. I didn't notice at first that the statement was about reference types only. I also thought that bit-by-bit comparison is provided for all value types, which I now know is not correct.

But, in case I'm using a reference type, would the == operator use the predefined reference comparison, or would it use the overloaded version of the operator if a type defined one?

Edit 2: Through trial and error, we learned that the == operator will use the predefined reference comparison when using an unrestricted generic type. Actually, the compiler will use the best method it can find for the restricted type argument, but will look no further. For example, the code below will always print true, even when Test.test<B>(new B(), new B()) is called:

class A { public static bool operator==(A x, A y) { return true; } }
class B : A { public static bool operator==(B x, B y) { return false; } }
class Test { void test<T>(T a, T b) where T : A { Console.WriteLine(a == b); } }
3
  • It might be useful to understand that even without generics, there are some types for which the == is not allowed between two operands of the same type. This is true for struct types (except "pre-defined" types) which do not overload the operator ==. As a simple example, try this: var map = typeof(string).GetInterfaceMap(typeof(ICloneable)); Console.WriteLine(map == map); /* compile-time error */ Aug 19, 2013 at 8:54
  • Continuing my own old comment. For example (see other thread), with var kvp1 = new KeyValuePair<int, int>(); var kvp2 = kvp1;, then you cannot check kvp1 == kvp2 because KeyValuePair<,> is a struct, it is not a C# pre-defined type, and it does not overload the operator ==. Yet an example is given by var li = new List<int>(); var e1 = li.GetEnumerator(); var e2 = e1; with which you cannot do e1 == e2 (here we have the nested struct List<>.Enumerator (called "List`1+Enumerator[T]" by the runtime) which does not overload ==). Jun 18, 2017 at 14:45
  • Equally valuable almost-duplicate (so not voting to close): Null or default comparison of generic argument in C#
    – GSerg
    Jun 14, 2019 at 17:53

14 Answers 14

346

As others have said, it will only work when T is constrained to be a reference type. Without any constraints, you can compare with null, but only null - and that comparison will always be false for non-nullable value types.

Instead of calling Equals, it's better to use an IComparer<T> - and if you have no more information, EqualityComparer<T>.Default is a good choice:

public bool Compare<T>(T x, T y)
{
    return EqualityComparer<T>.Default.Equals(x, y);
}

Aside from anything else, this avoids boxing/casting.

3
  • Minor aside, Jon; you might want to note the comment re pobox vs yoda on my post. Dec 24, 2008 at 12:38
  • 4
    Nice tip on using EqualityComparer<T>
    – chakrit
    Aug 23, 2011 at 13:01
  • Great answer, it also answers a question I had (12 years after you posted your answer ;-)) - I needed a generic function to check if a variable contains a default value. It was easy to write one returning a default value: T GetDefault<T>() => (T)default; But I couldn't write a function IsDefault<T>(value) without restricting it to IComparable which didn't work for all types. With your answer it is now simple: bool IsDefault<T>(T value) => Compare((T)default, value); is the answer to my question. Thanks, Jon!
    – Matt
    Nov 12, 2020 at 9:32
160

"...by default == behaves as described above for both predefined and user-defined reference types."

Type T is not necessarily a reference type, so the compiler can't make that assumption.

However, this will compile because it is more explicit:

    bool Compare<T>(T x, T y) where T : class
    {
        return x == y;
    }

Follow up to additional question, "But, in case I'm using a reference type, would the the == operator use the predefined reference comparison, or would it use the overloaded version of the operator if a type defined one?"

I would have thought that == on the Generics would use the overloaded version, but the following test demonstrates otherwise. Interesting... I'd love to know why! If someone knows please share.

namespace TestProject
{
 class Program
 {
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Test a = new Test();
        Test b = new Test();

        Console.WriteLine("Inline:");
        bool x = a == b;
        Console.WriteLine("Generic:");
        Compare<Test>(a, b);

    }


    static bool Compare<T>(T x, T y) where T : class
    {
        return x == y;
    }
 }

 class Test
 {
    public static bool operator ==(Test a, Test b)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Overloaded == called");
        return a.Equals(b);
    }

    public static bool operator !=(Test a, Test b)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Overloaded != called");
        return a.Equals(b);
    }
  }
}

Output

Inline: Overloaded == called

Generic:

Press any key to continue . . .

Follow Up 2

I do want to point out that changing my compare method to

    static bool Compare<T>(T x, T y) where T : Test
    {
        return x == y;
    }

causes the overloaded == operator to be called. I guess without specifying the type (as a where), the compiler can't infer that it should use the overloaded operator... though I'd think that it would have enough information to make that decision even without specifying the type.

5
  • 4
    Re: Follow Up 2: Actually the compiler will link it the best method it finds, which is in this case Test.op_Equal. But if you had a class that derives from Test and overrides the operator, then Test's operator will still be called.
    – Hosam Aly
    Dec 24, 2008 at 13:28
  • 4
    I good practice that I would like to point out is that you should always do the actual comparison inside an overridden Equals method (not in the == operator).
    – jpbochi
    Aug 19, 2009 at 16:34
  • 12
    Overload resolution happens compile-time. So when we have == between generic types T and T, the best overload is found, given what constraints are carried by T (there's a special rule that it will never box a value-type for this (which would give a meaningless result), hence there must be some constraint guaranteeing it's a reference type). In your Follow Up 2, if you come in with DerivedTest objects, and DerivedTest derives from Test but introduces a new overload of ==, you will have the "problem" again. Which overload is called, is "burned" into the IL at compile-time. Jan 5, 2013 at 18:51
  • 1
    wierdly this seems to work for general reference types (where you would expect this comparison to be on reference equality) but for strings it seems to also use reference equality - so you can end up comparing 2 identical strings and having == (when in a generic method with the class constraint) say they are different.
    – JonnyRaa
    May 14, 2013 at 11:33
  • It's because the signature doesn't match -- your constraint is for class, which effectively means that, at compile time, these are both instances of type object -- your == operator requires that both operands be of type Test, so, that operator won't be called due to a signature mismatch (remember, method and operator signature matching happens at compile time!) -- Same thing would happen if you boxed an instance of the Test class, btw. (i.e. Test a = new Test(); object b = new Test(); Console.WriteLine(a == b); will always return false.) Jun 10, 2018 at 2:08
49

In general, EqualityComparer<T>.Default.Equals should do the job with anything that implements IEquatable<T>, or that has a sensible Equals implementation.

If, however, == and Equals are implemented differently for some reason, then my work on generic operators should be useful; it supports the operator versions of (among others):

  • Equal(T value1, T value2)
  • NotEqual(T value1, T value2)
  • GreaterThan(T value1, T value2)
  • LessThan(T value1, T value2)
  • GreaterThanOrEqual(T value1, T value2)
  • LessThanOrEqual(T value1, T value2)
2
  • "If, however, == and Equals are implemented differently for some reason" - Holy smokes! What a however! Maybe I just need to see a use case to the contrary, but a library with divergent equals semantics will likely run into bigger problems than trouble with generics. Jul 20, 2017 at 16:53
  • @EdwardBrey you're not wrong; it would be nice if the compiler could enforce that, but... Jul 20, 2017 at 17:56
42

So many answers, and not a single one explains the WHY? (which Giovanni explicitly asked)...

.NET generics do not act like C++ templates. In C++ templates, overload resolution occurs after the actual template parameters are known.

In .NET generics (including C#), overload resolution occurs without knowing the actual generic parameters. The only information the compiler can use to choose the function to call comes from type constraints on the generic parameters.

3
  • 3
    but why can't compiler treat them as a generic object? after all == works for all types be it reference types or value types. That should be the question to which I dont think you answered.
    – nawfal
    Feb 3, 2013 at 18:11
  • 4
    @nawfal: Actually no, == doesn't work for all value types. More importantly, it doesn't have the same meaning for all types, so the compiler doesn't know what to do with it.
    – Ben Voigt
    Feb 4, 2013 at 0:17
  • 1
    Ben, oh yes I missed the custom structs we can create without any ==. Can you include that part too in your answer as I guess that's the main point here
    – nawfal
    Feb 4, 2013 at 0:20
15

The compile can't know T couldn't be a struct (value type). So you have to tell it it can only be of reference type i think:

bool Compare<T>(T x, T y) where T : class { return x == y; }

It's because if T could be a value type, there could be cases where x == y would be ill formed - in cases when a type doesn't have an operator == defined. The same will happen for this which is more obvious:

void CallFoo<T>(T x) { x.foo(); }

That fails too, because you could pass a type T that wouldn't have a function foo. C# forces you to make sure all possible types always have a function foo. That's done by the where clause.

2
  • 1
    Hosam, i tested with gmcs (mono), and it always compares references. (i.e it doesn't use an optionally defined operator== for T) Dec 24, 2008 at 8:43
  • There is one caveat with this solution: the operator== cannot be overloaded; see this StackOverflow question.
    – Dimitri C.
    May 27, 2010 at 10:00
12

It appears that without the class constraint:

bool Compare<T> (T x, T y) where T: class
{
    return x == y;
}

One should realize that while class constrained Equals in the == operator inherits from Object.Equals, while that of a struct overrides ValueType.Equals.

Note that:

bool Compare<T> (T x, T y) where T: struct
{
    return x == y;
}

also gives out the same compiler error.

As yet I do not understand why having a value type equality operator comparison is rejected by the compiler. I do know for a fact though, that this works:

bool Compare<T> (T x, T y)
{
    return x.Equals(y);
}
5
  • u know im a total c# noob. but i think it fails because the compiler doesn't know what to do. since T isn't known yet, what is done depends on the type T if value types would be allowed. for references, the references are just compared regardless of T. if you do .Equals, then .Equal is just called. Dec 24, 2008 at 7:02
  • but if you do == on a value type, the value type doesn't have to necassary implement that operator. Dec 24, 2008 at 7:05
  • That'd make sense, litb :) It is possible that user-defined structs do not overload ==, hence the compiler fail.
    – Jon Limjap
    Dec 24, 2008 at 7:37
  • 2
    The first compare method does not use Object.Equals but instead tests reference equality. For example, Compare("0", 0.ToString()) would return false, since the arguments would be references to distinct strings, both of which have a zero as their only character.
    – supercat
    May 30, 2013 at 21:27
  • 1
    Minor gotcha on that last one- you haven't restricted it to structs, so a NullReferenceException could happen.
    – Flynn1179
    Apr 20, 2017 at 14:13
7

Well in my case I wanted to unit-test the equality operator. I needed call the code under the equality operators without explicitly setting the generic type. Advises for EqualityComparer were not helpful as EqualityComparer called Equals method but not the equality operator.

Here is how I've got this working with generic types by building a LINQ. It calls the right code for == and != operators:

/// <summary>
/// Gets the result of "a == b"
/// </summary>
public bool GetEqualityOperatorResult<T>(T a, T b)
{
    // declare the parameters
    var paramA = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), nameof(a));
    var paramB = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), nameof(b));
    // get equality expression for the parameters
    var body = Expression.Equal(paramA, paramB);
    // compile it
    var invokeEqualityOperator = Expression.Lambda<Func<T, T, bool>>(body, paramA, paramB).Compile();
    // call it
    return invokeEqualityOperator(a, b);
}

/// <summary>
/// Gets the result of "a =! b"
/// </summary>
public bool GetInequalityOperatorResult<T>(T a, T b)
{
    // declare the parameters
    var paramA = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), nameof(a));
    var paramB = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), nameof(b));
    // get equality expression for the parameters
    var body = Expression.NotEqual(paramA, paramB);
    // compile it
    var invokeInequalityOperator = Expression.Lambda<Func<T, T, bool>>(body, paramA, paramB).Compile();
    // call it
    return invokeInequalityOperator(a, b);
}
6

There is an MSDN Connect entry for this here

Alex Turner's reply starts with:

Unfortunately, this behavior is by design and there is not an easy solution to enable use of == with type parameters that may contain value types.

5

If you want to make sure the operators of your custom type are called you can do so via reflection. Just get the type using your generic parameter and retrieve the MethodInfo for the desired operator (e.g. op_Equality, op_Inequality, op_LessThan...).

var methodInfo = typeof (T).GetMethod("op_Equality", 
                             BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.Public);    

Then execute the operator using the MethodInfo's Invoke method and pass in the objects as the parameters.

var result = (bool) methodInfo.Invoke(null, new object[] { object1, object2});

This will invoke your overloaded operator and not the one defined by the constraints applied on the generic parameter. Might not be practical, but could come in handy for unit testing your operators when using a generic base class that contains a couple of tests.

4

I wrote the following function looking at the latest msdn. It can easily compare two objects x and y:

static bool IsLessThan(T x, T y) 
{
    return ((IComparable)(x)).CompareTo(y) <= 0;
}
4
  • 4
    You can get rid of your booleans and write return ((IComparable)(x)).CompareTo(y) <= 0;
    – aloisdg
    Jun 26, 2016 at 18:23
  • 1
    What if T isn't an IComparable? Won't this throw an invalid cast exception? And if T is an IComparable why not just add that to the generic type constraint?
    – MetaFight
    Sep 6, 2021 at 13:00
  • @MetaFight IComparable is an interface.
    – Charlie
    Sep 10, 2021 at 19:49
  • 1
    @Charlie yes, I'm aware. My concern is that nothing guarantees T actually implements that interface. If it doesn't, then you get an exception. If it does, then it should probably be part of the generic constraint.
    – MetaFight
    Sep 11, 2021 at 23:41
3

bool Compare(T x, T y) where T : class { return x == y; }

The above will work because == is taken care of in case of user-defined reference types.
In case of value types, == can be overridden. In which case, "!=" should also be defined.

I think that could be the reason, it disallows generic comparison using "==".

1
  • 1
    The == token is used for two different operators. If for the given operand types there exists a compatible overload of the equality operator, that overload will be used. Otherwise if both operands are reference types that are compatible with each other, a reference comparison will be used. Note that in the Compare method above the compiler can't tell that the first meaning applies, but can tell the second meaning applies, so the == token will use the latter even if T overloads the equality-check operator (e.g. if it's type String).
    – supercat
    May 30, 2013 at 21:24
1

The .Equals() works for me while TKey is a generic type.

public virtual TOutputDto GetOne(TKey id)
{
    var entity =
        _unitOfWork.BaseRepository
            .FindByCondition(x => 
                !x.IsDelete && 
                x.Id.Equals(id))
            .SingleOrDefault();


    // ...
}
1
  • 1
    That's x.Id.Equals, not id.Equals. Presumably, the compiler knows something about the type of x.
    – Hosam Aly
    Oct 19, 2019 at 7:39
1

I have 2 solutions and they're very simply.

Solution 1: Cast the generic typed variable to object and use == operator.

Example:

void Foo<T>(T t1, T t2)
{
   object o1 = t1;
   object o2 = t2;
   if (o1 == o2)
   {
      // ...
      // ..
      // . 
   }
}

Solution 2: Use object.Equals(object, object) method.

Example:

void Foo<T>(T t1, T t2)
{
   if (object.Equals(t1, t2)
   {
       // ...
       // ..
       // .
   }
}
1

You can do this with C# 11 and .NET 7+:

    static void Main()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(Compare(2, 2));
        Console.WriteLine(Compare(2, 3));
    }
    static bool Compare<T>(T x, T y) where T : IEqualityOperators<T, T, bool>
    {
        return x == y;
    }

(you may prefer to use where T : INumber<T>, which covers this scenario and a lot more, but it depends on your specific needs; not all equatable types are numbers)

3
  • Thanks! This is the Generic math support feature in C# 11, isn't it? Does it work with .NET 6?
    – Hosam Aly
    Dec 20, 2022 at 15:14
  • 1
    @HosamAly yes, but it relies upon implementation in the actual primitive types, which .net 6 lacks; it'll work for your own types and interfaces, but not for the inbuilt types, which really means "no it won't work" Dec 22, 2022 at 9:35
  • Very clear. Thanks, @Marc!
    – Hosam Aly
    Dec 23, 2022 at 20:13

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