One of Tensorflow's mysteries for me is: when does a variable represent a single tensor vs. a batch? Below is an example of a network with a continuous value output (not a classifier). In the line beginning with loss I calculate the loss by subtracting predictions from truth values and summing the absolute values of those differences over a batch. In that line, Tensorflow inserts a batch of truth values for truthValues_placeholder, so truthValues_placeholder is a "batch" tensor, i.e. it has one entry for each item in the batch. However, the previous line calculates prediction as a single value (as opposed to a batch). My question: Am I correct that Tensorflow is magically changes prediction into a "batch tensor", so it also has one entry calculated for each item in the batch?

graph = tf.Graph()
with tf.Graph().as_default():
    ...
    # Network layers here
    ...
    # Final layer
    prediction = tf.matmul(inputsToLastLayer, weightsOutputLayer) + biasesOutputLayer
    loss = tf.nn.l2_loss(tf.sub(prediction, truthValues_placeholder))
    ...
    global_step = tf.Variable(0, name='global_step', trainable=False)
    train_op = optimizer.minimize(loss, global_step=global_step)
    ...
    sess = tf.Session()
    init = tf.initialize_all_variables()
    sess.run(init)
    for step in xrange(maxSteps):
        feed_dict = fill_feed_dict(..., truthValues_placeholder,...)
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Tensorflow behaves the same way as numpy, in that it broadcasts basic operations with individual units to the whole matrix, like

In [3]: np.zeros([10, 10]) - 1
Out[3]: 
array([[-1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1.],
   [-1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1.],
   [-1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1.],
   [-1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1.],
   [-1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1.],
   [-1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1.],
   [-1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1.],
   [-1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1.],
   [-1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1.],
   [-1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1., -1.]])

So, nothing really surprising. You can test your operations with NumPy first if you want to be sure.

  • Thanks Julius. Understood about broadcasting, but if I am broadcasting a single predicted value across a batch of truth values then I am doing something wrong. I want a batch of unique predicted values to be compared element-by-element with corresponding entries in the truth values batch, I.e. compare predictedValues[i] to truthValues[i] Does my code above do that? If not what do I need to change? – Ron Cohen Aug 23 '16 at 3:15
  • right, you are supposed to feed a batch of truth values the same size as the features batch – Julius Aug 23 '16 at 3:17
  • and you should probably use tf.reduce_mean(loss, axis=1) to have a scalar loss, because now your loss is batch_size wide – Julius Aug 23 '16 at 3:18
  • pretty sure it will just broadcast the single truth value to the set of predictions if the truth value is individual / scalar – Julius Aug 23 '16 at 3:20
  • which is indeed, wrong – Julius Aug 23 '16 at 3:20

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