I tried to detect whether a method has been called using #function in Swift, but it returns different result than the #selector's description. Here's a working code:

class SampleClass {

    var latestMethodCall: Selector?

    @objc func firstMethod() {
        latestMethodCall = #function
    }

    @objc func secondMethod(someParameters: Int, anotherParameter: Int) {
        latestMethodCall = #function
    }

    func isEqualToLatestMethod(anotherMethod anotherMethod: Selector) -> Bool {
        return latestMethodCall?.description == anotherMethod.description
    }
}


let sampleObject = SampleClass()

sampleObject.firstMethod()

let expectedFirstMethod = #selector(SampleClass.firstMethod)

if sampleObject.isEqualToLatestMethod(anotherMethod: expectedFirstMethod) {

    print("Working correctly!")

} else {

    print("Broken selector...")

    if let latestMethodCall = sampleObject.latestMethodCall {
        print("Object's latest method call: \(latestMethodCall.description)") // prints firstMethod()
        print("Expected method call: \(expectedFirstMethod.description)") // prints firstMethod
    }
}

sampleObject.secondMethod(5, anotherParameter: 7)

let expectedSecondMethod = #selector(SampleClass.secondMethod(_:anotherParameter:))

if sampleObject.isEqualToLatestMethod(anotherMethod: expectedSecondMethod) {

    print("Working correctly!")

} else {

    print("Broken selector...")

    if let latestMethodCall = sampleObject.latestMethodCall {
        print("Object's latest method call: \(latestMethodCall.description)") // prints secondMethod(_:anotherParameter:)
        print("Expected method call: \(expectedSecondMethod.description)") // prints secondMethod:anotherParameter:
    }
}

From the sample above, I found that #function returns Swift-y description, while #selector returns ObjC-y description. Is this expected? Or did I done something wrong?

Thank you for taking your time! :)

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In Swift < 3.0 Selector type can be initialized by String. Since doing this is unsafe (this approach came from dynamic Objective-C), #selector introduced in Swift 2.2. #selector will not allow you to define Selector for method that not exist.

Now, lets look deeper to initializing Selector by string. String for selector should have strictly special signature: for method without arguments func firstMethod() it is just method name without braces: "firstMethod". On other hand, #function keyword made absolutely not for defining Selector's, and it returns function label with braces:

@objc func firstMethod() {
    print(#function)
}
//firstMethod()

If you will define method with arguments, you will see that #function now will return same but without braces

@objc func firstMethod(param: Int) {
    print(#function)
}
//firstMethod

since Selector, again, expect other signature for it: "firstMethod:".

Conclusion: for defining Selector use #selector; in Swift >= 3.0 you will have no choice anyway.

  • 1
    Ah, I see... I forgot to add that I used Swift 2.2 for that. According to your conclusion, I should assigned latestMethodCall with #selector(SampleClass.firstMethod) for the firstMethod and #selector(SampleClass.secondMethod(_:anotherParameter:)) for the secondMethod, right? – edopelawi Aug 23 '16 at 11:32
  • 1
    Just tried changing #function to the #selector, and it worked perfectly! Thank you very much! – edopelawi Aug 23 '16 at 11:33

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