3

Why does the single where query give a different result than multiple where queries ?

query.Where("666 = ID");
query.Where("ActiveFrom < @0 && ActiveTo > @1 && ValidFrom < DateTime.Now && ValidTo > DateTime.Now", toDate, fromDate);

query.ToString(); results in :

SELECT  *
    FROM [Country] AS [Extent1]
    WHERE 666 = [Extent1].[ID]

and the same query with multiple where calls

query = query.Where("ActiveFrom < @0", toDate);
query = query.Where("ActiveTo > @0", fromDate);
query = query.Where("ValidFrom < DateTime.Now");
query = query.Where("ValidTo > DateTime.Now");

results in :

SELECT  *
FROM [Country] AS [Extent1]
WHERE (666 = [Extent1].[ID]) AND 
([Extent1].[ActiveFrom] < convert(datetime2, '2016-10-23 11:40:35.9538054', 121)) AND 
([Extent1].[ActiveTo] > convert(datetime2, '2016-06-23 11:40:35.9518052', 121)) AND
([Extent1].[ValidFrom] < (SysDateTime())) AND 
([Extent1].[ValidTo] > (SysDateTime()))
  • 1
    Not sure if it is a stupid question but by the code you posted... in the first example - did you set query = "first where" and then again for the second where? – Gilad Green Aug 23 '16 at 9:56
  • 2
    query.Where("666 = ID"); doesn't do anything because you're not assigning this query to a variable whereas your second example does it. – Tim Schmelter Aug 23 '16 at 9:56
2

In order for the different Wheres to be relevant you need to assign them back to query:

//instead of:
query.Where("666 = ID");
query.Where("ActiveFrom < @0 && ActiveTo > @1 && ValidFrom < DateTime.Now && ValidTo > DateTime.Now", toDate, fromDate);

//do:
query = query.Where("666 = ID");
query = query.Where("ActiveFrom < @0 && ActiveTo > @1 && ValidFrom < DateTime.Now && ValidTo > DateTime.Now", toDate, fromDate);

Also the Where calls can be chained. Most linq extension methods return IEnumerable<TSource> and therefore can be chained.

Applying the chaining on your second query it will look like this:

query = query.Where("ActiveFrom < @0", toDate)
             .Where("ActiveTo > @0", fromDate)
             .Where("ValidFrom < DateTime.Now")
             .Where("ValidTo > DateTime.Now");
1

Because the calls dont modify the query, they return a new instance representing the modified query instead. Thus the second example results in the big query whereas the first results in a simple where condition only.

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