47

Why does class D compile, but class C does not?

class A
{
    public:
        A(int) {}
};

template <class T>
class B : private T // Note: private base class
{
    public:
       using T::T;
};

class C : public B<A>
{
    public:
        C() : B<A>(123) {}  // Error: 'class A A::A' is inaccessible
};                          //         within this context

using BA = B<A>;

class D : public BA
{
    public:
        D() : BA(123) {}  // OK
};

I tested with GCC, Clang and Visual C++, and they are all the same. Changing class B : private T to public T solves the problem. But why? (Note that the using T::T is public.)

4
  • I've added the "templates" tag to attact the hotshots. Please direct any criticism of "tag spamming" at me.
    – Bathsheba
    Aug 23, 2016 at 13:03
  • If you replace B<A>(123) by B(123) it compiles, and if you make C templated and use B<T> everywhere it also compiles.
    – Holt
    Aug 23, 2016 at 13:03
  • That would justify the template tag, and indeed name lookup in class templates is subtly different.
    – MSalters
    Aug 23, 2016 at 13:13
  • Or this, or this.
    – LogicStuff
    Aug 23, 2016 at 13:19

1 Answer 1

43

Class A contains the injected-class-name A within its scope (that is, A::A refers to class A unless it happens to refer to the constructor).

Class B inherits this, so the name A within the scope of B refers to the injected-class-name A in scope of A. However, since A is a private base class of B, all names in scope of A are private within B.

Class C again inherits this, but it cannot access this A, since it is private within B. Hence the error. Note that the error is actually with using the name A in the construct B<A>.

Class BA doesn't have this problem, since the definition B<A> is not in the scope of any class, so the name A refers to the global name A and not to any injected-class-name. And of course, the name BA is public.

You can easily solve this by qualifying the name A in C:

class C : public B<A>
{
public:
  C() : B<::A>( 123 ) {}
};

Note that constructor inheritance has no effect there. The problem is with access to the class name A (injected in A and inherited in B and C), not with access to the constructor.

8
  • 1
    So, in other (poor) terms, the error is that it's trying to access the name A in the (let me say) wrong namespace (that is, the class B), am I wrong? Chapeau. Really interesting.
    – skypjack
    Aug 23, 2016 at 13:13
  • @skypjack Yes, that's it. Another way to put it is that the private, and hence inaccessible in-class name A, hides the (accessible) global name A. Aug 23, 2016 at 13:15
  • @Yvette Yep, fixed the comment. I've said that those are poor words!! :-)
    – skypjack
    Aug 23, 2016 at 13:16
  • 7
    So here is the short version of the problem then: class A {}; class B : A {}; class C : B { A a1; ::A a2; }; So a2 is OK, but a1 not. I can't believe I never encountered this before...
    – Barnett
    Aug 23, 2016 at 14:23
  • 1
    @Barnett Really, how often do you use private inheritance to start with? Aug 23, 2016 at 15:42

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