7

I have vectors that have numeric values. For example:

inVector <- c(2, -10, 5, 34, 7)

I need to transform this so that when I encounter a negative element, that negative element gets summed with subsequent elements until the element that turns the sum positive:

outVector <- c(2, 0, 0, 29, 7)

The negative elements will be made zeros so that the overall sum remains. So the elements 2 and 3 will be zero and the fourth element equals 29 = -10 + 5 + 34. I tried a for loop solution like this:

outVector <- numeric(length = length(inVector))

for(i in 1:length(inVector)) {
   outVector <- inVector
   outVector[i] <- ifelse(outVector[i] < 0, 0, outVector[i])
   outVector[i + 1] <- ifelse(outVector[i] == 0, sum(inVector[i:(i+1)]), outVector[i + 1])
   outVector <- outVector[1:length(inVector)]
   }

but that didn't work. However, I would be most interested of a solution that works in dplyr pipe as well.

2 Answers 2

6

If we want to optimize, we can use the more efficient Reduce function to iterate through the vector:

#Help function
zeroElement <- function(vec) {
  r <- Reduce(function(x,y) if(x >= 0) y else sum(x,y), vec, acc=TRUE)
  r[r < 0] <- 0
  return(r)
}

#Use function
zeroElement(x)
#[1]  2  0  0 29  7

Speed Test: 25% faster:

t3 <- MakeNonNeg(BigVec)
t4 <- zeroElement(BigVec)
all.equal(t3, t4)
#[1] TRUE
library(microbenchmark)
microbenchmark(
  makeNonNeg = MakeNonNeg(BigVec),
  zeroElement = zeroElement(BigVec),
  times=10)
# Unit: seconds
#        expr      min       lq     mean   median       uq      max neval cld
#  makeNonNeg 2.047484 2.099289 2.195988 2.111135 2.248381 2.531009    10   b
# zeroElement 1.529257 1.580789 1.666000 1.664855 1.725528 1.837825    10  a

Add session info for comparison:

sessionInfo()
R version 3.3.0 (2016-05-03)
Platform: x86_64-w64-mingw32/x64 (64-bit)
Running under: Windows >= 8 x64 (build 9200)
3
  • What are your system specs? I am getting completely different results with the timings. BTW, nice algorithm!! +1 Commented Aug 23, 2016 at 15:52
  • I checked again and got the same results. Perhaps someone else can also test.
    – Pierre L
    Commented Aug 23, 2016 at 17:38
  • I figured out what was going on. I've been working in R all day and forgot that I had enabled Just in Time compilation earlier this morning via library(compiler) and enableJIT(3). I will update my answer to reflect this. Sorry about that. Commented Aug 23, 2016 at 17:43
5

Try this:

MakeNonNeg <- function(v) {
    size <- length(v)
    myOut <- as.numeric(v)
    if (size > 1L) {
        for (i in 1:(size-1L)) {
            if (myOut[i] >= 0) {next}
            myOut[i+1L] <- myOut[i]+myOut[i+1L]
            myOut[i] <- 0
        }
    }
    myOut
}

MakeNonNeg(inVector)
[1]  2  0  0 29  7

Below is a more exotic example:

set.seed(4242)

BigVec <- sample(-40000:100000, 100000, replace = TRUE)
gmp::sum.bigz(BigVec)
Big Integer ('bigz') :
    [1] 2997861106

t3 <- MakeNonNeg(BigVec)
gmp::sum.bigz(t3)
Big Integer ('bigz') :
    [1] 2997861106

BigVec[1:20]
[1]  98056   8680  -7814  53620  58390  90832  74970 -16392  52648  83779 -17229  38484 -36589  75156  71200  95968 -11599  57705
[19]  19209 -21596

t3[1:20]
[1] 98056  8680     0 45806 58390 90832 74970     0 36256 83779     0 21255     0 38567 71200 95968     0 46106 19209     0

Here is my system info:

sessionInfo()
R version 3.3.0 (2016-05-03)
Platform: x86_64-w64-mingw32/x64 (64-bit)
Running under: Windows 7 x64 (build 7601) Service Pack 1

Below are timings for both functions with JIT disabled.

microbenchmark(
    makeNonNeg = MakeNonNeg(BigVec),
    zeroElement = zeroElement(BigVec),
    times=10)
Unit: milliseconds
       expr      min       lq     mean   median       uq      max neval
 makeNonNeg 254.1255 255.8430 267.9527 258.6369 277.0222 303.6516    10
zeroElement 152.0358 164.7988 175.3191 166.4948 198.3855 209.8739    10

With JIT enabled, we obtain much different results for makeNonNeg. However, the results for zeroElement don't change that much (I'm thinking that since Reduce is the major part of the function and it is already bytecoded, there is not much room for improvement).

library(compiler)
enableJIT(3)
[1] 0

microbenchmark(
    makeNonNeg = MakeNonNeg(BigVec),
    zeroElement = zeroElement(BigVec),
    times=10)
Unit: milliseconds
       expr       min        lq      mean    median        uq       max neval
 makeNonNeg  11.20514  11.55366  12.76953  11.84655  12.20554  20.60036    10
zeroElement 144.15123 149.33591 163.66421 157.34711 176.20139 198.57268    10

So, with JIT disabled, zeroElement is about 50% faster and when JIT is enabled, MakeNonNeg is about 13x faster.

5
  • I checked again and got the same results. One sign that your call is not capturing the same input is that your call is taking 12 milliseconds on yours and 2 seconds on mine. The time difference is very extreme. We may need someone else to check also to see whose data is off.
    – Pierre L
    Commented Aug 23, 2016 at 17:35
  • The compiler package looks interesting.
    – Pierre L
    Commented Aug 23, 2016 at 18:27
  • 2
    @PierreLafortune, yeah it is great!! There are a lot of useful functions in that package that can really help your performance. It seems to work best on very basic structures such as for loops and while loops. Check out these websites: FasteR! HigheR! StrongeR! and Speed up your R code.... Commented Aug 23, 2016 at 18:44
  • Thank you both for these brilliant answers! @JosephWood I use the function in dplyr pipe with group_by grouping of large data. While zeroElement works fine, makeNonNeg terminates with Error: argument is of lenght zero. I changed as.integer to as.numeric since my real life vector contains doubles, but otherwise the function is identical. Any idea what is causing that error? It would be great to be able to exploit that speed improvement.
    – Antti
    Commented Aug 24, 2016 at 7:15
  • @Antti, I think the problem is that you are passing a vector of length 1. I will update to account for such situations. Also, you should know that zeroElement and MakeNonNeg handle the last element differently. zeroElement sets the last element to 0 if it is negative whereas MakeNonNeg doesn't. The reason I chose that path is to keep the overall sum the same as the original vector. Commented Aug 24, 2016 at 12:50

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