14

Consider these two methods:

public static void forLoop(int start, int limit) {
    for (int i = start; i < limit; i++) {

    }
}

public static void whileLoop(int start, int limit) {
    int i = start;
    while (i < limit) {
        i++;
    }
}

When compiled, they produce the bytecode (this is the verbose output of javap):

  public static void forLoop(int, int);
    descriptor: (II)V
    flags: ACC_PUBLIC, ACC_STATIC
    Code:
      stack=2, locals=3, args_size=2
         0: iload_0
         1: istore_2
         2: iload_2
         3: iload_1
         4: if_icmpge     13
         7: iinc          2, 1
        10: goto          2
        13: return
      LineNumberTable:
        line 6: 0
        line 9: 13
      LocalVariableTable:
        Start  Length  Slot  Name   Signature
            2      11     2     i   I
            0      14     0 start   I
            0      14     1 limit   I

  public static void whileLoop(int, int);
    descriptor: (II)V
    flags: ACC_PUBLIC, ACC_STATIC
    Code:
      stack=2, locals=3, args_size=2
         0: iload_0
         1: istore_2
         2: iload_2
         3: iload_1
         4: if_icmpge     13
         7: iinc          2, 1
        10: goto          2
        13: return
      LineNumberTable:
        line 12: 0
        line 13: 2
        line 14: 7
        line 16: 13
      LocalVariableTable:
        Start  Length  Slot  Name   Signature
            0      14     0 start   I
            0      14     1 limit   I
            2      12     2     i   I

As you can see, the code section for both of these methods is exactly the same. However, when I decompile this class using JD, it correctly produces:

public static void forLoop(int start, int limit) {
  for (int i = start; i < limit; i++) {}
}

public static void whileLoop(int start, int limit)
{
  int i = start;
  while (i < limit) {
    i++;
  }
}

How was it able to do this? The bytecode of these methods is exactly the same! Despite the fact that the LineNumberTable and LocalVariableTable attributes were different for each method, I am reluctant to believe that is the reason since those are not required attributes for the Code attribute of a method to contain (per section 4.7 of The Java Language Specification, Java SE 8 Edition).

0

1 Answer 1

5

The line numbers and local variable scope.

for loop:

 LineNumberTable:
    line 6: 0
    line 9: 13
  LocalVariableTable:
    Start  Length  Slot  Name   Signature
        2      11     2     i   I
        0      14     0 start   I
        0      14     1 limit   I

while loop:

LineNumberTable:
        line 12: 0
        line 13: 2
        line 14: 7
        line 16: 13
  LocalVariableTable:
    Start  Length  Slot  Name   Signature
        0      14     0 start   I
        0      14     1 limit   I
        2      12     2     i   I

The for loop has fewer distinct lines of code - which makes sense because it wraps up the initialization and increment in one line.

7
  • 2
    Why does compiled code need to know local variable scope?
    – shmosel
    Aug 23, 2016 at 22:58
  • I don't think it needs to, but it certainly helps with debugging. I'd imagine that's the only reason it's there. There are probably tools that can remove it. Aug 23, 2016 at 23:00
  • My guess is that it helps for utilizing the local variable list more efficiently. For example, if a local variable stored in index 2 falls out of scope, the compiler knows that it can re-use index 2 for another local variable. If indices were not re-used, the "max locals" for each method would be equivalent to the number of local variables declared in the method, not the maximum number of local variables visible in a certain scope within the method. Aug 23, 2016 at 23:01
  • @MartinTuskevicius That can all be calculated at compile time.
    – shmosel
    Aug 23, 2016 at 23:09
  • @MartinTuskevicius That's all true but it describes compile-time operations.
    – user207421
    Aug 23, 2016 at 23:11

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