5

is there a function or a property to get a variables name?

Something like

msgBox myVariable.name or

msgBox nameOfVariable(myVariable)

that returns "myVariable" when I defined it with e.g. myVariable = "whatever"? Google just brings questions to variable referencing...

6
  • 2
    why would you want to do that? XY problem? Aug 24, 2016 at 7:08
  • I want some variables to be filled into cells specified by the names (of variables and cells).
    – alve89
    Aug 24, 2016 at 7:11
  • 3
    no there isn't. you must use either a Dictionary object or a Class Aug 24, 2016 at 7:14
  • 2
    myVariable is the name of the variable myVariable. To assign it to a cell, simply do [A1] = myVariable Aug 24, 2016 at 7:29
  • @alve89 could you rephrase this : "I want some variables to be filled into cells specified by the names (of variables and cells)." ? I don't understand what you are trying to do
    – Thomas G
    Aug 24, 2016 at 14:34

2 Answers 2

2

a possible Class approach would be the following (commented):

  1. Add Class Module

    in VBA IDE

    • click Insert-> Class Module

    • click View -> Property Window

    • enter (Name) property textbox and type in "Variable" (or whatever you may prefer but be consistent with in following steps)

    • enter the following code in the Class code pane

      Option Explicit
      
      'declare the fields that will be attached to every instance of this class
      Public name As String '<--| this will store the name of the variable to which you'll set the object of this class
      Public value As Variant '<--| this will store the value associated with the variable to which you'll set the object of this class
      
      'declare a `method` to write the `value` of the object in the named range named after the `name` field 
      Sub WriteRange(Optional wb As Variant) '<--| you can pass the reference of the workbook whose named ranges you want to exploit
         If IsMissing(wb) Then Set wb = ActiveWorkbook '<--| if no workbook reference is passed then the currently active workbook is assumed
         If TypeName(wb) = "Workbook" Then '<-- check for a proper workbook reference being passed)
              On Error Resume Next '<-- to prevent unassigned named range throw an error
              wb.Names(name).RefersToRange.value = value '<--| write the  value of the `value` filed of the current instance in the named range of the passed workbook named after the `name` filed of the current instance
          End If
      End Sub 
      
  2. Exploit Variable Class in your code

    as an example of exploiting the Variable class for three variables with, say, a String value for the 1st, an Integer value for the 2nd and a Double value for the 3rd, in any module code pane enter the following code:

        Option Explicit
    
        Sub main()
            Dim myVariable1 As Variable, myVariable2 As Variable, myVariable3 As Variable '<--| declare your variables of type "Variable": choose whatever name you may want
    
            Set myVariable1 = CreateVariable("myVariable1", "this is a string value") '<-- set your 1st variable with its name (you must use the same name as the variable!) and value (myVariable1 will have a `String`type value)
            Set myVariable2 = CreateVariable("myVariable2", 10) '<-- set your 2nd variable with its name (you must use the same name as the variable!) and value (myVariable2 will have a `Integer`type value)
            Set myVariable3 = CreateVariable("myVariable3", 0.3)'<-- set your 3rd variable with its name (you must use the same name as the variable!) and value (myVariable3 will have a `Double` type value)
    
            'exploit `WriteRange` method of your Class to write the object value into the corresponding named range: you must have set proper named ranges in your currently active workbook
            myVariable1.WriteRange '<--| this will write the string "this is a string value" in named range "myVariable1" of your currently active workbook
            myVariable2.WriteRange '<--| this will write the number '10' in named range "myVariable2" of your currently active workbook
            myVariable3.WriteRange '<--| this will write the number '0.3' in named range "myVariable3" of your currently active workbook 
        End Sub
    
        ' helper Function to create an object of `Variable` class and initialize its `name` and `value` properties 
        Function CreateVariable(name As String, value As Variant) As Variable '<--| the function returns an object of `Variable` class
            Set CreateVariable = New Variable '<--| this creates a new object of `Variable` class
            With CreateVariable '<--| refer to the newly created object and ...
                .name = name '<--| ... set its `name` property ...
                .value = value '<--| ... and its `value` property
            End With
        End Function
    
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0

If you only have a few variables then a class module is over kill. While it is true that a class module is a template that can be copied, I have explored a simplification which mimics a class module.

Create a standard module with the name of your variable as the module name. Inside this module create functions like Name, Value e.g.

Function Name()
    Name = "myNewName"
End Function

Function Value()
    Value = 10
End Function

in a cell, paste =my_VBA_Project.myVariable.Name()

The drawback is that the values are hard coded like a constant. To change the values, you need to edit the function values manually.

I use this format in my VBA programming to simulate OOP.

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