16

In C++, what happens when a function that is supposed to return an object ends without a return statement? What gets returned?

e.g.

std::string func() {}
  • 18
    Undefined behavior. – πάντα ῥεῖ Aug 24 '16 at 8:37
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    @πάνταῥεῖ, I've never been more disappointed with the current standard until now. – StoryTeller - Unslander Monica Aug 24 '16 at 8:38
  • 3
    Another case of "undefined behavior" which could easily be reported as a compiler error. Sometimes it is a warning: "Not all control paths return a value". – BitTickler Aug 24 '16 at 8:41
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    @BitTickler Sometimes, you can prove by business logic that a control path will never be reached, but the compiler's static analyser can't. Combine this with a return type which is syntactically difficult to construct, or even impossible to construct in the function in question (private ctors etc.) and you have a hard-to-workaround error which is not really an error in your case. – Angew is no longer proud of SO Aug 24 '16 at 8:49
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    @BitTickler You misunderstood me. I was saying that sometimes, you can have a path without return which looks reachable, but is actually not, because of contexts invisible to the compiler (such as call sites). And the return type can be such that creating an artificial return statement can be difficult. – Angew is no longer proud of SO Aug 24 '16 at 11:17
28

What gets returned?

We don't know. According to the standard, the behavior is undefined.

§6.6.3/2 The return statement [stmt.return]:

(emphasis mine)

Flowing off the end of a constructor, a destructor, or a function with a cv void return type is equivalent to a return with no operand. Otherwise, flowing off the end of a function other than main (basic.start.main) results in undefined behavior.

In fact most compilers would give a warning for it, like Clang:

warning: control reaches end of non-void function [-Wreturn-type]

  • 1
    Will the compiler sometimes try to build an object with the default constructor? – Matt Munson Aug 24 '16 at 8:54
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    @MattMunson It could, if it wants. It's just undependable. – songyuanyao Aug 24 '16 at 9:01
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    @MattMunson no. In practice, the return value is either contained in a register or pointed to by one. In the former case the register may or may not contain the correct value. In the latter case, the pointer will either be pointing to the wrong place, or to the correct (but uninitialised) memory. Either way, it's bad. – Richard Hodges Aug 24 '16 at 10:24
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    @MattMunson That's an awful idea. It would make the code so much harder to debug. It's better to have trash returned so that you end up triggering a segfault or some other error and at least you know that something is wrong somewhere and you can start debugging step-by-step. Even better is using -Wall -Werror which would make the compiler fail at compile time when detecting this. – Bakuriu Aug 24 '16 at 11:41
7

In C++, what happens when a function that is supposed to return an object ends without a return statement?

It causes undefined behavior. No one can tell what exactly will happen.

  • interesting, I thought it might return an object built from the default constructor. Though, I suppose not all classes have one. – Matt Munson Aug 24 '16 at 8:43
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    @immibis It does mean "it's impossible to predict what will happen," though. – Angew is no longer proud of SO Aug 24 '16 at 11:18
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    Re: "No one can tell what exactly will happen": no, that's overstated. It means only that the language definition doesn't tell you what happens. Your compiler documentation might tell you. – Pete Becker Aug 24 '16 at 12:35
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    @RoadieRich Legal according to the standard, not legal according to any CPU architecture I'm aware of. Even the so-called "halt and catch fire" instruction is not literal. – user253751 Aug 25 '16 at 5:52
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    @immibis Take a look at this LLVM blog about UB. The point is that yes, for some UB, the compiler might provide a definition. But in general, results of UB are arbitrary and thus unpredictable. It can be affected by changes in seemingly unrelated code, it can be affected by register/cache state at the time it happens, ... Perhaps it's actually deterministic, but in no way which would be logically predictable. – Angew is no longer proud of SO Aug 25 '16 at 6:48
5

I was curious, so I made a few tests on Visual C++ 2015.

int f()
{
    if (false)
        return 42;

    // oops
}

int main()
{
    int i = f();
}

I had to add the if to get a warning instead of a hard error:

> cl /nologo /FAs /c a.cpp
a.cpp(6) : warning C4715: 'f': not all control paths return a value

The assembly code that's generated is pretty simple and I've removed the irrelevant parts. Here's the meat of f():

f:
    xor eax, eax
    je label
    mov eax, 42
label:
    ret

The xor line is basically eax=0. Because if (false) is a constant condition, the generated code doesn't even bother to do a comparison and will then jump unconditionally to label, which just returns from the function. You can see that the "return value" (42) would actually be stored in eax, but that this line won't ever be executed. Therefore, eax == 0.

Here's what main() does:

    call f
    mov _i$[ebp], eax
    ret

It calls f() and blindly copies eax into a location on the stack (where i is). Therefore, i == 0.

Let's try something more complicated with an object and a constructor:

struct S { int i=42; };

S f()
{
    if (false)
        return {};

    // oops
}

int main()
{
    S s = f();
}

What main() does is basically reserve sizeof(S) bytes on the stack, put the address of the first byte in eax and then call f():

    lea eax, _s$[ebp]
    push eax
    call f

Again, f() won't do anything, as it will unconditionally jump to the end of the function:

f:
    xor eax, eax
    je label
    ; some stuff
    ; call S::S(), which would set i to 42
    ; but none of that will happen
label:
    ret

So what happened to the sizeof(S) bytes in main? They were never changed. They contain whatever was already in memory at that particular location. They contain garbage.

This is with an unoptimized build, on a given version of a given compiler. Change the compiler, change the behaviour. Enable the optimizer, drastically change the behaviour.

Don't do it.

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