28

I have an error object which when printed on console gives me Token is expired

How can I compare it with a specific error value. I tried this but did not work.

if(err == errors.New("Token is expired")){
      log.Printf("Unauthorised: %s\n", err)
}
  • 3
    I would avoid using accepted approach. Take a look on Dαve Cheney presentation about error handling youtube.com/watch?v=lsBF58Q-DnY. I will definitely answer your question. – s7anley Aug 24 '16 at 13:07
22

Try

err.Error() == "Token is expired"

Or create your own error by implementing the error interface.

22

Define an error value in a library

package fruits

var NoMorePumpkins = errors.New("No more pumpkins")

Do not create errors with errors.New anywhere in the code but return the predefined value whenever error occurs and then you can do the following:

package shop

if err == fruits.NoMorePumpkins {
     ...
}

See io package errors for reference.

  • One downside to this is that another package could potentially overwrite the value of the exported NoMorePumpkins variable. Would be nice if there were a way to do that with a const – captncraig May 22 '17 at 13:24
  • 1
    @captncraig well then you could use a getter function – Winger Sendon May 31 '17 at 20:59
  • @WingerSendon good point. That may be my favorite solution yet. – captncraig May 31 '17 at 21:01
  • but why would you overwrite an other's package error? – math2001 Sep 27 '18 at 1:48
11

It's idiomatic for packages to export error variables that they use so others can compare against them.

E.g. If an error would came from a package named myPkg and was defined as:

var ErrTokenExpired error = errors.New("Token is expired")

You could compare the errors directly as:

if err == myPkg.ErrTokenExpired {
    log.Printf("Unauthorised: %s\n", err)
}

If the errors come from a third party package and that doesn't use exported error variables then what you can do is simply to compare against the string you get from err.Error() but be careful with this approach as changing an Error string might not be released in a major version and would break your business logic.

  • A lot better than comparing strings. – luben May 23 '17 at 21:17
  • 100% better :) upvote – BlocksByLukas Aug 30 '18 at 10:55
6

The error type is an interface type. An error variable represents any value that can describe itself as a string. Here is the interface's declaration:

type error interface {
    Error() string
}

The most commonly-used error implementation is the errors package's unexported errorString type:

// errorString is a trivial implementation of error.
type errorString struct {
    s string
}

func (e *errorString) Error() string {
    return e.s
}

See this working code output (The Go Playground):

package main

import (
    "errors"
    "fmt"
    "io"
)

func main() {
    err1 := fmt.Errorf("Error")
    err2 := errors.New("Error")
    err3 := io.EOF

    fmt.Println(err1)         //Error
    fmt.Printf("%#v\n", err1) // &errors.errorString{s:"Error"}
    fmt.Printf("%#v\n", err2) // &errors.errorString{s:"Error"}
    fmt.Printf("%#v\n", err3) // &errors.errorString{s:"EOF"}
}

output:

Error
&errors.errorString{s:"Error"}
&errors.errorString{s:"Error"}
&errors.errorString{s:"EOF"}

Also see: Comparison operators

Comparison operators compare two operands and yield an untyped boolean value. In any comparison, the first operand must be assignable to the type of the second operand, or vice versa.

The equality operators == and != apply to operands that are comparable.

Pointer values are comparable. Two pointer values are equal if they point to the same variable or if both have value nil. Pointers to distinct zero-size variables may or may not be equal.

Interface values are comparable. Two interface values are equal if they have identical dynamic types and equal dynamic values or if both have value nil.

A value x of non-interface type X and a value t of interface type T are comparable when values of type X are comparable and X implements T. They are equal if t's dynamic type is identical to X and t's dynamic value is equal to x.

Struct values are comparable if all their fields are comparable. Two struct values are equal if their corresponding non-blank fields are equal.


So:

1- You may use Error(), like this working code (The Go Playground):

package main

import (
    "errors"
    "fmt"
)

func main() {
    err1 := errors.New("Token is expired")
    err2 := errors.New("Token is expired")
    if err1.Error() == err2.Error() {
        fmt.Println(err1.Error() == err2.Error()) // true
    }
}

output:

true

2- Also you may compare it with nil, like this working code (The Go Playground):

package main

import (
    "errors"
    "fmt"
)

func main() {
    err1 := errors.New("Token is expired")
    err2 := errors.New("Token is expired")
    if err1 != nil {
        fmt.Println(err1 == err2) // false
    }
}

output:

false

3- Also you may compare it with exact same error, like this working code
(The Go Playground):

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "io"
)

func main() {
    err1 := io.EOF
    if err1 == io.EOF {
        fmt.Println("err1 is : ", err1)
    }
}

output:

err1 is :  EOF

ref: https://blog.golang.org/error-handling-and-go

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