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I occasionally come to a place where I will not be changing the contents of an array, but I need to know its count several times over a function. Is it more efficient to assign the .count of the array to a variable and use it multiple times, or does the compiler make the efficiency equivalent?

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    I'd suggest: Don't worry about it...until it's a problem. Until your profiler indicates that there's a bottleneck there, use whichever way you find more readable. – James Webster Aug 24 '16 at 18:15
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    @JamesWebster agree 10000%. In tight loops small things such as this can definitely matter, especially if there's retain/release calls being emitted, but in most cases the optimizer will do the right thing and it'll be really obvious with Instruments when it's not and easy to fix in those specific cases. – Jack Lawrence Aug 24 '16 at 18:19
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    "Don't worry about it...until it's a problem" isn't my job. I am a solo font-end developer working on a year long project to make an Enterprise App. I got this position directly out of college at a startup that will be successful if I do my job right. I have to do everything perfect that I can my first time around, because I can't afford all of the perks that 10 man teams have. I write my code as close to perfect as I can, and than I refactor it every time I need another layer of depth. There will be issues, but this company and its success will be equivalent to my own. – Sethmr Aug 24 '16 at 19:25
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    I have to do everything perfect that I can my first time around - In a large number of cases, the "perfect" thing to do, is not to micro-optimise. e.g. For this question alone, you've spent let's say an hour of your time, considering the potential problem, typing this question, reading the answers and editing your code to find that you've saved 0.0001s. That hour could have been better spent using a profiler to find out where an actual bottleneck/leak/other problem existed and fixing that instead. – James Webster Aug 26 '16 at 10:02
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    I'd like to make clear that I don't mean "Don't worry about everything", I mean "Don't worry about optimization". – James Webster Aug 26 '16 at 10:04
4

Let's investigate! Is myArray.count equivalent to accessing a stored property or is it a computed property performing some "unnecessary" calculations if called repeatedly for a non-mutated array? (Disregarding compiler cleverness)

/// The number of elements in the array.
public var count: Int {
  return _getCount()
}

// ... what is function _getCount()?

internal func _getCount() -> Int {
  return _buffer.count
}

// ... what is property _buffer?
internal var _buffer: _Buffer

// ... what is type _Buffer? (Swift)
internal typealias _Buffer = _ContiguousArrayBuffer<Element>

// ... what is type _ContiguousArrayBuffer?
// --> switch source file
import SwiftShims

/// Class used whose sole instance is used as storage for empty
/// arrays.  The instance is defined in the runtime and statically
/// initialized.  See stdlib/runtime/GlobalObjects.cpp for details.
internal struct _ContiguousArrayBuffer<Element> : _ArrayBufferProtocol {

  // ... conformance to _ArrayBufferProtocol

  /// The number of elements the buffer stores.
  internal var count: Int {
    get {
      return __bufferPointer.header.count
    }
    // ...
  }   
  // ...
}

// ... what is property __bufferPointer?
var __bufferPointer: ManagedBufferPointer<_ArrayBody, Element>

// what is type _ArrayBody?
// we notice for now that it is used in the following class:
internal final class _EmptyArrayStorage
  : _ContiguousArrayStorageBase {
  // ...

  var countAndCapacity: _ArrayBody // telling name for a tuple? :)
}

// --> proceed to core/ArrayBody.swift
import SwiftShims

// ...

internal struct _ArrayBody {
  var _storage: _SwiftArrayBodyStorage

  // ...

  /// The number of elements stored in this Array.
  var count: Int {
    get {
      return _assumeNonNegative(_storage.count)
    }
    set(newCount) {
      _storage.count = newCount
    }
  } 
}

// we are near our price! we need to look closer at  _SwiftArrayBodyStorage, 
// the type of _storage, so lets look at SwiftShims, GlobalObjects.cpp
// (as mentioned in source comments above), specifically
// --> switch source file
struct _SwiftArrayBodyStorage {
  __swift_intptr_t count;              
  __swift_uintptr_t _capacityAndFlags;
};

// Yay, we found a stored property!

So in the end count is a stored property and is not computed per call, so it should be no reason to explicitly store the arr.count property by yourself.

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    I need to get better at just looking and seeing this stuff. After watching you do it, it became obvious!. Thank you for the post!!! – Sethmr Aug 24 '16 at 19:27
  • @Sethmr happy to help! – dfrib Aug 24 '16 at 19:36
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struct _SwiftArrayBodyStorage {
    __swift_intptr_t count;
    __swift_uintptr_t _capacityAndFlags;
};

this is the struct that Swift implements. According to this count is there all the time knowing how many elements are in buffer. You probably can use that

info form: https://ankit.im/swift/2016/01/08/exploring-swift-array-implementation/

edit for more info

public var count: Int {
  get {
    return __bufferPointer.value.count
  }
  nonmutating set {
     _sanityCheck(newValue >= 0)

     _sanityCheck(
        newValue <= capacity,
        "Can't grow an array buffer past its capacity")

        __bufferPointer._valuePointer.memory.count = newValue
    }
}
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    "It is better to assign count to variable" – Why? – Martin R Aug 24 '16 at 18:37
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It doesn't matter; I'd suggest just doing whatever makes your code simpler and easier to understand. In release builds, the optimizer should inline and notice that the value will be the same across calls. Regardless, Array.count is basically equivalent in performance/codegen to accessing a local variable.

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    "Array.count is basically equivalent in performance/codegen to accessing a local variable" – that might be true, but do you have any references supporting your claim? What does "basically equivalent" mean? – Martin R Aug 24 '16 at 18:20
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Array.count is a precomputed value. Since it doesn't compute it on the fly, it is far less work to use it than to use memory to store it a second time. Even so, neither method should matter unless being done in the millions+.

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