Eg. how can I transform the integer 7 to the float 0.111?

The naive way would be to convert 7 to the string 111, convert that to the integer 111 and then divide by 1000 to get 0.111. Is there a better/faster way, though?

Here's a working example.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

// Convert 32-bit uint to string
// http://stackoverflow.com/questions/699968/display-the-binary-representation-of-a-number-in-c
const char* bin(uint32_t n){
    uint N = 32;
    static unsigned char ucharBuffer[32+1];
    char *p_buffer = ucharBuffer;

    if(!n)
        return "0";

    // Work from the end of the buffer back
    p_buffer += N;
    *p_buffer-- = '\0';

    //For each bit (going backwards) store character
    while(n){
        if (N-- == 0)
            return NULL;
        *p_buffer-- = ((n & 1) == 1) ? '1' : '0';
        n >>= 1;}

    return p_buffer+1;}


int main(){

    uint INPUT = 7;
    const char *p = bin(INPUT);
    char *end;

    printf("%d -> ", INPUT);
    printf("'%.*s' -> ", (uint)(end-p), p);
    printf("%.3f\n", (double) strtol(p, &end, 10)/1000);

}
  • 1
    Out of curiosity, why are you doing this? It seems an odd conversion, given that under it, e.g. 3 > 3221225471 (0.11 > 0.10111111111111111111111111111111) and 2 = 1 (0.10 = .1). – Ray Aug 24 '16 at 20:09
  • I imagine there is a strange structure being used to represent a floating point value. – jxh Aug 24 '16 at 20:14
  • @Ray So the original motivation is to construct a Sobol sequence like this, but I made I mistake and this question doesn't actually help with that! (I think.) Hopefully it helps someone someday. – étale-cohomology Sep 1 '16 at 23:15
  • 1
    Ah, that makes a bit more sense. jxh's solution is still basically the right approach; you just need to loop over the bits in the opposite direction in order to reverse the sequence. for (int bit = CHAR_BIT * sizeof(unsigned) - 1; bit >= 0; bit--) { x += (input >> bit) & 1; x /= 10.0; } – Ray Sep 1 '16 at 23:43
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You don't need to convert into a string. C has binary operators that work just fine for this purpose.

double binary_inverse (unsigned input) {
    double x = 0;
    while (input) {
        x += input & 0x1;
        x /= 10;
        input >>= 1;
    }
    return x;
}
  • But what if we want 0.0101? Actually this question is for the OP – Eugene Sh. Aug 24 '16 at 20:03
  • @EugeneSh.: Right, the OP's problem doesn't make that scenario possible. It seems like the input is already normalized. – jxh Aug 24 '16 at 20:06
  • 1
    So the problem statement would be "Binary integer to fraction between 0.1 and 0.111(1)". – Eugene Sh. Aug 24 '16 at 20:08
  • @EugeneSh.: Well, 0 is possible. – jxh Aug 24 '16 at 20:09
  • 1
    Yeah. Which makes me wonder about the application of such a strange conversion – Eugene Sh. Aug 24 '16 at 20:10

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