I'm implementing customized loop behavior, where I need things to happen on entering the loop, at every loop start, at every loop end, and on exiting the loop area. So far this is beautifully simple in Python (2.7):

def my_for(loop_iterable):
    enter_loop()
    for i in loop_iterable:
        loop_start()
        yield i
        loop_end()
    exit_loop()

for i in my_for([1, 2, 3]):
    print "i: ", i
    if i == 2:
        break

The problem I'm having is in getting loop_end() and exit_loop() to execute after the break. I have solved this by defining another function, which the user must put before break:

def break_loop():
    loop_end()
    exit_loop()

for i in my_for([1, 2, 3]):
    print "i: ", i
    if i == 2:
        break_loop()
        break

But I would really like not to have the user have to remember to add that line. I think if I re-write the generator function as an iterator class, maybe there is a way to still execute code on a break?

Incidentally, continue works just fine as is!

  • Why are you implementing customized loop behavior? – Blender Aug 24 '16 at 23:36
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You could use a context manager:

class Looper(object):
    def __init__(self, iterable):
        self.iterable = iterable
        self.need_to_end = False

    def __enter__(self):
        return self

    def __exit__(self, exception_type, exception_value, traceback):
        self.exit_loop()
        # Handle exceptions or swallow them by returning True

    def enter_loop(self):
        print 'enter_loop'

    def loop_start(self):
        self.need_to_end = True
        print 'loop_start'

    def loop_end(self):
        self.need_to_end = False
        print 'loop_end'

    def exit_loop(self):
        if self.need_to_end:
            self.loop_end()

        print 'exit_loop'

    def __iter__(self):
        self.enter_loop()

        for i in self.iterable:
            self.loop_start()
            yield i
            self.loop_end()

Your code would get a little longer, but you can deal with exceptions and other things more cleanly:

with Looper([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]) as loop:
    for i in loop:
        print i

        if i == 2:
            continue
        elif i == 3:
            break

It works as you'd expect:

enter_loop
loop_start
1
loop_end
loop_start
2
loop_end
loop_start
3
loop_end
exit_loop
  • Thanks that's it! With the addition of a self.exited attribute, it can call exit_loop() at the end of the iterator (to be used as the generator I had), and conditionally calling exit_loop() in __exit__() still allows context managing. Works like a charm! I'll provide both ways to do it. – Adam S. Aug 25 '16 at 0:47

You may use __enter__ and __exit__ magic function by defining it in class. To make a call, you may use it with with. __enter__ method will be called before executing the code within with block and and when the with block will be exited, __exit__ function will be called. For example:

>>> class MyTestWrapper(object):
...     def __enter__(self):
...         print 'I am in __enter__'
...     def __exit__(self, type, value, traceback):
...         print 'I am in __exit__'
...
>>> with MyTestWrapper() as s:
...     print 'My Loop Logic'
...
I am in __enter__
My Loop Logic
I am in __exit__

Now in order to make it as iterator, you have to define __iter__ function. With this, you can call it as an iterator. Updated code will be:

>>> class MyIterator(object):
...     def __init__(self, iterable):
...         self.iterable = iterable
...         self.need_to_end = False
...     def __enter__(self):
...         print 'I am in __enter__'
...         return self
...     def __exit__(self, type, value, traceback):
...         self.loop_end()
...         print 'I am in __exit__'
...     def loop_start(self):
...         self.need_to_end = True
...         print 'Starting Loop . . . '
...     def loop_end(self):
...         self.need_to_end = False
...         print 'Ending Loop . . . '
...     def __iter__(self):
...         for i in self.iterable:
...             self.loop_start()
...             yield i
...             self.loop_end()
...
>>> with MyIterator([1,2,3, 4]) as my_iterator:
...     for i in my_iterator:
...         print 'I am: ', i
...         if i == 2:
...             break
...
I am in __enter__
Starting Loop . . .
I am:  1
Ending Loop . . .
Starting Loop . . .
I am:  2
Ending Loop . . .
I am in __exit__

Refer Python's Context Manager for more information on these and other inbuilt functions.

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