1
class MyString
  include Enumerable
  def initialize(n)
    @num = n
  end
  def each
    i = 0
    while i < @num
      yield "#{i} within while"
      puts "After yield #{i}"
      i += 1
    end
  end
end

s = MyString.new(10)
a = s.to_enum
puts "first"
puts a.next
puts "second"
puts  a.next

My ruby version is 2.2.5, and outputs of codes are

first
0 within while
second
After yield 0
1 within while

I think the execution flow is first a.next->s.each->while->yield->second a.next->jump into while loop My question is how Enumerator#next method is implemented?

I probably know there are break in block yield invoked, which cause yield->second a.next; however, I don't understand how second a.next can jump back into a while loop.

2
  • I guess what confuse you is the yield keyword, not how next is implemented. – halfelf Aug 25 '16 at 4:28
  • @halfelf: I believe it is very much about Enumerator: it was not possible in 1.8, before fibers were introduced. Plain yield works only with blocks, and there is no blocks in OP's code. Which means the block that catches the tield is inside Enumerator. – Amadan Aug 25 '16 at 4:44
4

I don't understand how second a.next can jump back into a while loop.

Magic. Enumerator's (and Fiber's) superpowers.

These two classes were introduced in Ruby 1.9, and share many similarities; in particular, they allow you to do manual co-operative green-threading.

Let's look at fibers first, as they are more basic:

f = Fiber.new do
  puts "A"
  Fiber.yield 1
  puts "B"
  Fiber.yield 2
  puts "C"
end

puts "First"    # First
puts f.resume   # A
                # 1
puts "Second"   # Second
puts f.resume   # B
                # 2
puts "End"      # End
f.resume        # C
f.resume        # FiberError: dead fiber called

Basically, a fiber is like a thread, but it will pause whenever it yields by Fiber.yield, and resume whenever it is resumed by Fiber#resume. It is implemented in C as basic capability of Ruby, so as a student of Ruby (as opposed to student of Ruby interpreter) you don't need to know how it works, just that it does (just like you need to know IO#read will read a file, but not necessarily how it is implemented in C).

Enumerator is almost the same concept, but adapted for iteration (whereas Fiber is more multi-purpose). In fact, we can write the above almost exactly word-for-word the same with an Enumerator:

e = Enumerator.new do |yielder|
  puts "A"
  yielder.yield 1
  puts "B"
  yielder.yield 2
  puts "C"
end

puts "First"    # First
puts e.next     # A
                # 1
puts "Second"   # Second
puts e.next     # B
                # 2
puts "End"      # End
e.next          # C
                # StopIteration: iteration reached an end
2
  • "Basically, a fiber is like a thread" – I would say it's more like a semi-coroutine than like a thread. – Jörg W Mittag Aug 25 '16 at 6:30
  • @JörgWMittag: AFAIK, fibers are not like semi-coroutines, they are semi-coroutines. However, many people know about threads, while semi-coroutines are not that widely known. – Amadan Aug 25 '16 at 6:35

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.