3

I am using curses module in python to display output in real time by reading a file. The string messages are output to the console using addstr() function but I am not able to achieve printing to a newline wherever I need.

sample code:

import json
import curses
w=curses.initscr()

try:
    while True:
        with open('/tmp/install-report.json') as json_data:
            beta = json.load(json_data)
            w.erase()
            w.addstr("\nStatus Report for Install process\n=========\n\n")
            for a1, b1 in beta.iteritems():
                w.addstr("{0} : {1}\n".format(a1, b1))
            w.refresh()
finally:
    curses.endwin()

The above is not really outputting the strings to a new line (notice the \n in addstr()) with each iteration. On the contrary, the script fails off with error if I resize the terminal window.

w.addstr("{0} ==> {1}\n".format(a1, b1))
_curses.error: addstr() returned ERR
5
  • Why not just print() your information? Do you have a reason to need to say, scroll back or interrupt the printing process? – Wayne Werner Aug 25 '16 at 12:07
  • @WayneWerner well i am trying to output the data in real time as and when a json file gets updated in the backend. and for that i am using curses. something like linux 'top' command format. print() statement wont fit properly in the curses context as i am looping in to read a file constantly. so print() will clutter the console – cool77 Aug 25 '16 at 12:18
  • @SurestTexas if someone hasn't given a reason they're using a thing I don't presume they have a good reason for it. Experience has shown that most of the time... they don't! – Wayne Werner Mar 13 '17 at 1:28
  • @SurestTexas have you met software developers? I mean, some people use emacs for crying out loud ;) In all seriousness - aside from saying that they're using curses, is there anything in this question that suggests the need for it? From what I see it's exactly the opposite - the OP is printing out a status report for an install. It's exactly equivalent to seeing an OP post that they're reading a .csv file with pandas and summing one of the columns. Yeah, they can, but it's possibly excessive and the OP may not be aware that they could do it another way. Some of us just get enamored by shiny – Wayne Werner Mar 13 '17 at 17:07
  • "In the face of ambiguity, refuse the temptation to guess" - if it looks like a duck (print statement) and quacks like a duck (print statement) then I'm going to ask if they shouldn't be using a duck (print statement) :) – Wayne Werner Mar 14 '17 at 11:58
3

There's not enough program to offer more than general advice:

  • you will get an error when printing to the end of the screen if your script does not enable scrolling (see window.scroll).
  • if you resize the terminal window, you will have to read the keyboard to dispose of any KEY_RESIZE (and ignore errors).

Regarding the expanded question, these features would be used something like this:

import json
import curses
w=curses.initscr()
w.scrollok(1) # enable scrolling
w.timeout(1)  # make 1-millisecond timeouts on `getch`

try:
    while True:
        with open('/tmp/install-report.json') as json_data:
            beta = json.load(json_data)
            w.erase()
            w.addstr("\nStatus Report for Install process\n=========\n\n")
            for a1, b1 in beta.iteritems():
                w.addstr("{0} : {1}\n".format(a1, b1))
            ignore = w.getch()  # wait at most 1msec, then ignore it
finally:
    curses.endwin()
3
  • i have added additional code in context (edited my original post). i went through the curses documentation but not getting how to implement window.scroll or KEY_RESIZE in my code context – cool77 Aug 27 '16 at 17:45
  • It works now. one small glitch i see. when the output is more than screen full. i cannot scroll up to see the initial lines of the output. is there a way to scroll up and see the initial output lines . – cool77 Aug 27 '16 at 18:24
  • That's expected (if your application needs to do this, it has to either use a large-enough pad instead of just a window, or use some other way to save the data). – Thomas Dickey Aug 27 '16 at 18:26

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