2

I have simple hierarchy of classes (base class A, derived class B : A, derived class C : A, etc). I have following code:

void computation(A base_class)
{
    if (base_class is B)
    {
        //Do some stuff with (base_class as B)
    }
    if (base_class is C)
    {
        //Do some stuff with (base_class as C)
    }
}

I remembered about dynamic keyword of c# language. As I understood, I can use following code (to optimize extra conversions).

void computation(A base_class)
{
    dynamic temp = base_class as B;
    if (temp != null)
    {
        //Do some stuff with temp
    }
    temp = base_class as C;
    if (temp != null)
    {
        //Do some stuff with (base_class as C)
    }
}

Which variant is better for usage? What about performance of these approaches?

6
  • 2
    B temp = base_class as B; dynamic has nothing to do with this. It would certainly not improve performance. – Dennis_E Aug 25 '16 at 16:17
  • @Dennis_E, can you tell more detailed? I little bit don't understand you – LmTinyToon Aug 25 '16 at 16:20
  • 1
    You don't need to use dynamic if you know the type you're casting to. In this case you can just use B b = base_class as B; if (b != null) { ... } – Lee Aug 25 '16 at 16:21
  • 2
    why don't you just create overloads for B and C? – Daniel A. White Aug 25 '16 at 16:24
  • 1
    I agree with @DanielA.White. I hope this question is more of a theoretical nature because the posted code does unpleasant things with polymorphism – stephen.vakil Aug 25 '16 at 16:26
5

This smells like premature optimization and i dont like the dynamic usage here.

Also keep in mind that dynamic does specific things like (quote from MSDN):

The dynamic type enables the operations in which it occurs to bypass compile-time type checking. Instead, these operations are resolved at run time.

So i guess bypassing compile time type checking is not what you want.

I recommend using var instead. Imho it improves readability, debugging is easier and using as instead of is + casting is also a bit faster.

void computation(A base_class)
{
    var b = base_class as B;
    if (b != null)
    {
        //Do some stuff with temp
    }
    var c = base_class as C;
    if (c != null)
    {
        //Do some stuff with (base_class as C)
    }
}
2
5

It you have an inheritance hierarchy, yet at run time you need to know what concrete class you're dealing with in order to know what to do - chances are you're doing it wrong!

public abstract class A
{
    public abstract void DoSomething();
}

public class B: A
{
    public override void DoSomething() { .. do B's thing ... }
}

public class C : A
{
    public override void DoSomething() { .. do C's thing ... }
}


...
public void Consumer(A a)
{
    a.DoSomething(); // calls the right DoSomething, B or C.
}
...

Note that the above is overly contrived example. There are other things to consider (like, is a public abstract method the right thing to do!)

1
  • 1
    Sometimes you dont have this luxury because e.g. classes are from thrid party / sealed etc. But good point indeed. – ViRuSTriNiTy Aug 25 '16 at 16:30

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.