34

Just instead of:

if  ( ch == 'A' || ch == 'B' || ch == 'C' || .....

For example, to do it like:

if  ( ch == 'A', 'B', 'C', ...

is there even a shorter way to summarize conditions?

10
  • 7
    No, there's no shorthand for this.
    – Barmar
    Aug 25 '16 at 16:58
  • 22
    Maybe you want isupper(ch)?
    – Barmar
    Aug 25 '16 at 17:00
  • 21
    If your values are consecutive as shown, if (ch >= 'A' && ch <= 'C') or wherever it goes to. Aug 25 '16 at 17:00
  • 7
    is this c++ or c? because there's a shorthand-ish way in c++ even if the things you're checking against aren't contiguous. Aug 25 '16 at 17:02
  • 9
    Please remove either the C tag or the C++ tag to clearly identify which language you're using.
    – skrrgwasme
    Aug 25 '16 at 20:35

12 Answers 12

86

strchr() can be used to see if the character is in a list.

const char* list = "ABCXZ";
if (strchr(list, ch)) {
  // 'ch' is 'A', 'B', 'C', 'X', or 'Z'
}
10
  • 8
    Maybe that is personal style, but I would eliminate the intermediate list variable and directly pass the string as an argument.
    – MikeMB
    Aug 25 '16 at 18:49
  • 15
    @monkeyman79 You waiting tens of seconds for a reaction to a button isn't because people wrote code like this. It's because, when it was time to actually optimize, people didn't find the real bottlenecks correctly. Also, "awful response" was a bit harsh; the OP wasn't even asking about a performance bottleneck centered around this code. This is a 100% fine answer.
    – Jason C
    Aug 25 '16 at 23:46
  • 3
    it's good if the characters are random, but not if they're contiguous
    – phuclv
    Aug 26 '16 at 3:37
  • 5
    @L And yet, it works flawlessly with contiguous characters.
    – Jason C
    Aug 26 '16 at 14:32
  • 6
    This quick and dirty solution actually has a problem: ch = '\0' will also match. If you already know that ch cannot be null, that's OK, otherwise, it is a bug. You can avoid this with: if (memchr("ABCXY", ch, 5) { ... }, which should be faster anyway.
    – chqrlie
    Aug 27 '16 at 11:28
40

In this case you could use a switch:

switch (ch) {
case 'A':
case 'B':
case 'C':
    // do something
    break;
case 'D':
case 'E':
case 'F':
    // do something else
    break;
...
}

While this is slightly more verbose than using strchr, it doesn't involve any function calls. It also works for both C and C++.

Note that the alternate syntax you suggested won't work as you might expect because of the use of the comma operator:

if  ( ch == 'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E', 'F' )

This first compares ch to 'A' and then discards the result. Then 'B' is evaluated and discarded, then 'C', and so forth until 'F' is evaluated. Then 'F' becomes the value of the conditional. Since any non-zero value evaluated to true in a boolean context (and 'F' is non-zero), then the above expression will always be true.

2
  • How is this not the accepted answer?
    – SQB
    Aug 26 '16 at 22:09
  • It doesn't work in every way. Only if the cases are known at runtime. It's also not an if statement based on boolean, it's a lookup operation. Aug 27 '16 at 8:22
34

Templates allow us to express ourselves in this way:

if (range("A-F").contains(ch)) { ... }

It requires a little plumbing, which you can put in a library.

This actually compiles out to be incredibly efficient (at least on gcc and clang).

#include <cstdint>
#include <tuple>
#include <utility>
#include <iostream>

namespace detail {
    template<class T>
    struct range
    {
        constexpr range(T first, T last)
        : _begin(first), _end(last)
        {}

        constexpr T begin() const { return _begin; }
        constexpr T end() const { return _end; }

        template<class U>
        constexpr bool contains(const U& u) const
        {
            return _begin <= u and u <= _end;
        }

    private:
        T _begin;
        T _end;
    };

    template<class...Ranges>
    struct ranges
    {
        constexpr ranges(Ranges...ranges) : _ranges(std::make_tuple(ranges...)) {}

        template<class U>
        struct range_check
        {
            template<std::size_t I>
            bool contains_impl(std::integral_constant<std::size_t, I>,
                               const U& u,
                               const std::tuple<Ranges...>& ranges) const
            {
                return std::get<I>(ranges).contains(u)
                or contains_impl(std::integral_constant<std::size_t, I+1>(),u, ranges);
            }

            bool contains_impl(std::integral_constant<std::size_t, sizeof...(Ranges)>,
                               const U& u,
                               const std::tuple<Ranges...>& ranges) const
            {
                return false;
            }


            constexpr bool operator()(const U& u, std::tuple<Ranges...> const& ranges) const
            {
                return contains_impl(std::integral_constant<std::size_t, 0>(), u, ranges);
            }
        };

        template<class U>
        constexpr bool contains(const U& u) const
        {
            range_check<U> check {};
            return check(u, _ranges);
        }

        std::tuple<Ranges...> _ranges;
    };
}

template<class T>
constexpr auto range(T t) { return detail::range<T>(t, t); }

template<class T>
constexpr auto range(T from, T to) { return detail::range<T>(from, to); }

// this is the little trick which turns an ascii string into
// a range of characters at compile time. It's probably a bit naughty
// as I am not checking syntax. You could write "ApZ" and it would be
// interpreted as "A-Z".
constexpr auto range(const char (&s)[4])
{
    return range(s[0], s[2]);
}

template<class...Rs>
constexpr auto ranges(Rs...rs)
{
    return detail::ranges<Rs...>(rs...);
}

int main()
{
    std::cout << range(1,7).contains(5) << std::endl;
    std::cout << range("a-f").contains('b') << std::endl;

    auto az = ranges(range('a'), range('z'));
    std::cout << az.contains('a') << std::endl;
    std::cout << az.contains('z') << std::endl;
    std::cout << az.contains('p') << std::endl;

    auto rs = ranges(range("a-f"), range("p-z"));
    for (char ch = 'a' ; ch <= 'z' ; ++ch)
    {
        std::cout << ch << rs.contains(ch) << " ";
    }
    std::cout << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

expected output:

1
1
1
1
0
a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g0 h0 i0 j0 k0 l0 m0 n0 o0 p1 q1 r1 s1 t1 u1 v1 w1 x1 y1 z1 

For reference, here was my original answer:

template<class X, class Y>
bool in(X const& x, Y const& y)
{
    return x == y;
}

template<class X, class Y, class...Rest>
bool in(X const& x, Y const& y, Rest const&...rest)
{
    return in(x, y) or in(x, rest...);
}

int main()
{
    int ch = 6;
    std::cout << in(ch, 1,2,3,4,5,6,7) << std::endl;

    std::string foo = "foo";
    std::cout << in(foo, "bar", "foo", "baz") << std::endl;

    std::cout << in(foo, "bar", "baz") << std::endl;
}
15
  • 7
    This is nice, but looks like a huge overkill if only char comparsion in needed. Aug 25 '16 at 17:31
  • 37
    Deep down inside, everybody wants to write code in LISP. Aug 25 '16 at 17:43
  • 5
    Deep down inside, everybody wants to wear the paint off their angle bracket keys.
    – Jason C
    Aug 25 '16 at 23:49
  • 3
    @RichardHodges do you mean that the lesson is to always write a base case or that the lesson is that the errors are unreadable?
    – Caridorc
    Aug 26 '16 at 15:20
  • 2
    @hyde Who cares, really. The sentiment of the OPs comment was pretty clear and bears no further pedantic analysis. Nothing is to be gained by your line of questioning except for unwelcome comment noise.
    – Jason C
    Aug 26 '16 at 18:16
14

If you need to check a character against an arbitrary set of characters, you could try writing this:

std::set<char> allowed_chars = {'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E', 'G', 'Q', '7', 'z'};
if(allowed_chars.find(ch) != allowed_chars.end()) {
    /*...*/
}
15
  • 4
    a static const set maybe? Aug 25 '16 at 18:16
  • 1
    Unless you are dealing with very, very big character sets (more than 256), that must be the slowest possible way to do this.
    – MikeMB
    Aug 25 '16 at 18:54
  • 4
    @Xirema: Why do you think it is faster than strchr? And why would the strchr version require comments?
    – MikeMB
    Aug 25 '16 at 19:47
  • 3
    @Xirema: I very much doubt that asymptotic complexity matters here and std::set is a pretty inefficient data structure for storing characters (Chandler expained this imho quite well on cppcon14: youtube.com/watch?v=fHNmRkzxHWs). If you have time you might want to have a look at the my pseudo-"benchmark": ideone.com/h6WxBI. On my machine strchr outperforms the std::set solution by a factor of 2 or more, but that is probably highly system, compiler and benchmark specific. It is actually not as bad as I expected.
    – MikeMB
    Aug 25 '16 at 21:39
  • 4
    @Xirema O(n) vs. O(log(n)) for a set of 9 items is irrelevant here, especially considering overhead and presumed other processing. If you're trying to make a performance argument for some reason, use a bool charIsAllowed[256] lookup table with unsigned chars for O(1) instead.
    – Jason C
    Aug 25 '16 at 23:52
14

Yet another answer on this overly-answered question, which I'm just including for completeness. Between all of the answers here you should find something that works in your application.

So another option is a lookup table:

// On initialization:
bool isAcceptable[256] = { false };
isAcceptable[(unsigned char)'A'] = true;
isAcceptable[(unsigned char)'B'] = true;
isAcceptable[(unsigned char)'C'] = true;

// When you want to check:
char c = ...;
if (isAcceptable[(unsigned char)c]) {
   // it's 'A', 'B', or 'C'.
}

Scoff at the C-style static casts if you must, but they do get the job done. I suppose you could use an std::vector<bool> if arrays keep you up at night. You can also use types besides bool. But you get the idea.

Obviously this becomes cumbersome with e.g. wchar_t, and virtually unusable with multibyte encodings. But for your char example, or for anything that lends itself to a lookup table, it'll do. YMMV.

3
  • 2
    Might be worth an edit to slip in a mention of std::map for those sparse, multibyte cases. Aug 26 '16 at 3:15
  • 1
    And 256 should be replaced by 1<<CHAR_BIT in general.
    – Ruslan
    Aug 26 '16 at 19:54
  • 1
    ^^^ Thar be some fine comments.
    – Jason C
    Aug 26 '16 at 21:35
12

Similarly to the C strchr answer, In C++ you can construct a string and check the character against its contents:

#include <string>
...
std::string("ABCDEFGIKZ").find(c) != std::string::npos;

The above will return true for 'F' and 'Z' but false for 'z' or 'O'. This code does not assume contiguous representation of characters.

This works because std::string::find returns std::string::npos when it can't find the character in the string.

Live on Coliru

Edit:

There's another C++ method which doesn't involve dynamic allocation, but does involve an even longer piece of code:

#include <algorithm> // std::find
#include <iterator> // std::begin and std::end
...
char const chars[] = "ABCDEFGIKZ";
return std::find(std::begin(chars), std::end(chars), c) != std::end(chars);

This works similarly to the first code snippet: std::find searches the given range and returns a specific value if the item isn't found. Here, said specific value is the range's end.

Live on Coliru

8
  • It is telling, that the c++-ish version is a lot longer and possibly requires a dynamic memory alllocation to do the same thing as the c-style version. Luckily most of the c-standard library is also part of the c++ standard library.
    – MikeMB
    Aug 25 '16 at 18:29
  • Indeed. One could also do a std::find on the same static array as the C version, which would eliminate the dynamic allocation at the price of increased length. Aug 25 '16 at 18:32
  • @MikeMB added the amusingly verbose alternative without dynamic allocation Aug 25 '16 at 18:58
  • I'm really looking forward to the day when one can use things like std::string_view and ranges in SO answers ;)
    – MikeMB
    Aug 25 '16 at 19:44
  • 1
    Disadvantage of the first method: it has to create a string object every time. Sadly the std::find solution doesn't generate code quite as efficient as strchr: godbolt.org/g/aRPgbU
    – kfsone
    Aug 26 '16 at 23:47
6

One option is the unordered_set. Put the characters of interest into the set. Then just check the count of the character in question:

#include <iostream>
#include <unordered_set>

using namespace std;

int main() {
  unordered_set<char> characters;
  characters.insert('A');
  characters.insert('B');
  characters.insert('C');
  // ...

  if (characters.count('A')) {
    cout << "found" << endl;
  } else {
    cout << "not found" << endl;
  }

  return 0;
}
6

There is solution to your problem, not in language but in coding practices - Refactoring.

I'm quite sure that readers will find this answer very unorthodox, but - Refactoring can, and is used often to, hide a messy piece of code behind a method call. That method can be cleaned later or it can be left as it is.

You can create the following method:

private bool characterIsValid(char ch) {
    return (ch == 'A' || ch == 'B' || ch == 'C' || ..... );
}

and then this method can be called in a short form as:

if (characterIsValid(ch)) ...

Reuse that method with so many checks and only returning a boolean, anywhere.

2
  • 5
    private bool methodName() looks neither like C nor like C++...
    – Ruslan
    Aug 26 '16 at 20:05
  • Code refactorings are language agnostic. Mar 29 '17 at 1:42
3

For a simple and effective solution, you can use memchr():

#include <string.h>

const char list[] = "ABCXZ";
if (memchr(list, ch, sizeof(list) - 1)) {
    // 'ch' is 'A', 'B', 'C', 'X', or 'Z'
}

Note that memchr() is better suited than strchr() for this task as strchr() would find the null character '\0' at the end of the string, which is incorrect for most cases.

If the list is dynamic or external and its length is not provided, the strchr() approach is better, but you should check if ch is different from 0 as strchr() would find it at the end of the string:

#include <string.h>

extern char list[];
if (ch && strchr(list, ch)) {
    // 'ch' is one of the characters in the list
}

Another more efficient but less terse C99 specific solution uses an array:

#include <limits.h>

const char list[UCHAR_MAX + 1] = { ['A'] = 1, ['B'] = 1, ['C'] = 1, ['X'] = 1, ['Z'] = 1 };
if (list[(unsigned char)ch]) {
    /* ch is one of the matching characters */
}

Note however that all of the above solutions assume ch to have char type. If ch has a different type, they would accept false positives. Here is how to fix this:

#include <string.h>

extern char list[];
if (ch == (char)ch && ch && strchr(list, ch)) {
    // 'ch' is one of the characters in the list
}

Furthermore, beware of pitfalls if you are comparing unsigned char values:

unsigned char ch = 0xFF;
if (ch == '\xFF') {
    /* test fails if `char` is signed by default */
}
if (memchr("\xFF", ch, 1)) {
    /* test succeeds in all cases, is this OK? */
}
0
2

For this specific case you can use the fact that char is an integer and test for a range:

if(ch >= 'A' && ch <= 'C')
{
    ...
}

But in general this is not possible unfortunately. If you want to compress your code just use a boolean function

if(compare_char(ch))
{
    ...
}
3
  • 3
    Please state explicitly the assumptions that this code makes. It is not portable. Aug 25 '16 at 17:04
  • 1
    That first test will not work if the range of characters is larger and you're working with EBCDIC, not ASCII. Aug 25 '16 at 17:05
  • 5
    @PaulMcKenzie If there's z/OS developers reading this question, we've got bigger problems.
    – Jason C
    Aug 26 '16 at 0:10
2

The X-Y answer on the vast majority of modern systems is don't bother.

You can take advantage of the fact that practically every character encoding used today stores the alphabet in one sequentially-ordered contiguous block. A is followed by B, B is followed by C, etc... on to Z. This allows you to do simple math tricks on letters to convert the letter to a number. For example the letter C minus the letter A , 'C' - 'A', is 2, the distance between c and a.

Some character sets, EBCDIC was discussed in the comments above, are not sequential or contiguous for reasons that are out of scope for discussion here. They are rare, but occasionally you will find one. When you do... Well, most of the other answers here provide suitable solutions.

We can use this to make a mapping of letter values to letters with a simple array:

//                    a,b,c,d,e,f,g,h,i,j,k,l,m,n,o,p, q,r,s,t,u,v,w,x,y, z
int lettervalues[] = {1,3,3,2,1,4,2,4,1,8,5,1,3,1,1,3,10,1,1,1,1,4,4,8,4,10};

So 'c' - 'a' is 2 and lettervalues[2] will result in 3, the letter value of C.

No if statements or conditional logic required what-so-ever. All the debugging you need to do is proof reading lettervalues to make sure you entered the correct values.

As you study more in C++, you will learn that lettervalues should be static (current translation unit-only access) and const (cannot be changed), possibly constexpr (cannot be changed and fixed at compile time). If you don't know what I'm talking about, don't worry. You'll cover all three later. If not, google them. All are very useful tools.

Using this array could be as simple as

int ComputeWordScore(std::string in)
{
    int score = 0;
    for (char ch: in) // for all characters in string
    {
        score += lettervalues[ch - 'a'];
    }
    return score;
}

But this has two fatal blind spots:

The first is capital letters. Sorry Ayn Rand, but 'A' is not 'a', and 'A'-'a' is not zero. This can be solved by using std::tolower or std::toupper to convert all input to a known case.

int ComputeWordScore(std::string in)
{
    int score = 0;
    for (char ch: in) // for all characters in string
    {
        score += lettervalues[std::tolower(ch) - 'a'];
    }
    return score;
}

The other is input of characters that aren't letters. For example, '1'. 'a' - '1' will result in an array index that is not in the array. This is bad. If you're lucky your program will crash, but anything could happen, including looking as though your program works. Read up on Undefined Behaviour for more.

Fortunately this also has a simple fix: Only compute the score for good input. You can test for valid alphabet characters with std::isalpha.

int ComputeWordScore(std::string in)
{
    int score = 0;
    for (char ch: in) // for all characters in string
    {
        if (std::isalpha(ch))
        {
            score += lettervalues[std::tolower(ch) - 'a'];
        }
        else
        {
            // do something that makes sense here. 
        }
    }
    return score;
}

My something else would be return -1;. -1 is an impossible word score, so anyone who calls ComputeWordScore can test for -1 and reject the user's input. What they do with it is not ComputeWordScore's problem. Generally the stupider you can make a function, the better, and errors should be handled by the closest piece of code that has all the information needed to make a decision. In this case, whatever read in the string would likely be tasked with deciding what to do with bad strings and ComputeWordScore can keep on computing word scores.

5
  • 1
    The answer doesn't look very useful. First it starts with an unportable assumption (although explicitly explained). Then it introduces a solution which is prone to errors: needs careful proof-reading, can have buffer overflows. After that it also introduces a bunch of irrelevant keywords. After several bug fixes the final solution doesn't look reliable at all.
    – Ruslan
    Aug 26 '16 at 20:03
  • 1
    Looks be damned. It is reliable. The irrelevant keywords, assuming you know what they mean and how to use them, make it more reliable. The table-based look-up is very easy to modify and maintain. I will grant you it requires some care in ensuring the correct values are assigned to the correct letters, but this is the case in any solution. Here all of the numbers are in one place and easily checked. There are no bug fixes; just the minimum testing required to validate user input. If you don't test everything a user gives you, you're a fool. Aug 26 '16 at 20:56
  • 1
    That's why downvoters usually don't comment. Because it's easy to be damned by the poster insulted by the downvote.
    – Ruslan
    Aug 26 '16 at 21:07
  • 4
    @Ruslan: "X be damned" is an English idiom. Here X is "Looks", so the phrase means "How the code looks is unimportant to me."
    – indiv
    Aug 26 '16 at 22:18
  • @Ruslan My apologies for any misinterpretation. I neglected to consider the international nature of Stack Overflow in my response. The only intentional malice in my comment is directed at those who do not verify data coming from unreliable or hostile sources. Aug 27 '16 at 2:14
1

Most of the terse versions have been covered, so I will cover the optimized cases with some helper macros to make them a little more terse.

It just so happens that if your range falls within your number of bits per long that you can combine all of your constants using a bitmask and just check that your value falls in the range and the variable's bitmask is non-zero when bitwise-anded with the constant bitmask.

/* This macro assumes the bits will fit in a long integer type,
 * if it needs to be larger (64 bits on x32 etc...),
 * you can change the shifted 1ULs to 1ULL or if range is > 64 bits,
 * split it into multiple ranges or use SIMD
 * It also assumes that a0 is the lowest and a9 is the highest,
 * You may want to add compile time assert that:
 * a9 (the highest value) - a0 (the lowest value) < max_bits
 * and that a1-a8 fall within a0 to a9
 */
#define RANGE_TO_BITMASK_10(a0,a1,a2,a3,a4,a5,a6,a7,a8,a9) \
  (1 | (1UL<<((a1)-(a0))) | (1UL<<((a2)-(a0))) | (1UL<<((a3)-(a0))) | \
  (1UL<<((a4)-(a0))) | (1UL<<((a5)-(a0))) | (1UL<<((a6)-(a0))) | \
  (1UL<<((a7)-(a0))) | (1UL<<((a8)-(a0))) | (1UL<<((a9)-(a0))) )

/*static inline*/ bool checkx(int x){
    const unsigned long bitmask = /* assume 64 bits */
        RANGE_TO_BITMASK_10('A','B','C','F','G','H','c','f','y','z');
    unsigned temp = (unsigned)x-'A';
    return ( ( temp <= ('z'-'A') ) && !!( (1ULL<<temp) & bitmask ) );
}

Since all of a# values are constants, they will be combined into 1 bitmask at compile time. That leaves 1 subtraction and 1 compare for the range, 1 shift and 1 bitwise and ... unless the compiler can optimize further, it turns out clang can (it uses the bit test instruction BTQ):

checkx:                                 # @checkx
        addl    $-65, %edi
        cmpl    $57, %edi
        ja      .LBB0_1
        movabsq $216172936732606695, %rax # imm = 0x3000024000000E7
        btq     %rdi, %rax
        setb    %al
        retq
.LBB0_1:
        xorl    %eax, %eax
        retq

It may look like more code on the C side, but if you are looking to optimize, this looks like it may be worth it on the assembly side. I'm sure someone could get creative with the macro to make it more useful in a real programming situations than this "proof of concept".

That will get a little complex as a macro, so here is an alternative set of macros to setup a C99 lookup table.

#include <limits.h>
#define INIT_1(v,a) [ a ] = v
#define INIT_2(v,a,...) [ a ] = v, INIT_1(v, __VA_ARGS__)
#define INIT_3(v,a,...) [ a ] = v, INIT_2(v, __VA_ARGS__)
#define INIT_4(v,a,...) [ a ] = v, INIT_3(v, __VA_ARGS__)
#define INIT_5(v,a,...) [ a ] = v, INIT_4(v, __VA_ARGS__)
#define INIT_6(v,a,...) [ a ] = v, INIT_5(v, __VA_ARGS__)
#define INIT_7(v,a,...) [ a ] = v, INIT_6(v, __VA_ARGS__)
#define INIT_8(v,a,...) [ a ] = v, INIT_7(v, __VA_ARGS__)
#define INIT_9(v,a,...) [ a ] = v, INIT_8(v, __VA_ARGS__)
#define INIT_10(v,a,...) [ a ] = v, INIT_9(v, __VA_ARGS__)
#define ISANY10(x,...) ((const unsigned char[UCHAR_MAX+1]){ \
                          INIT_10(-1, __VA_ARGS__) \
                       })[x]

bool checkX(int x){
  return ISANY10(x,'A','B','C','F','G','H','c','f','y','z');
}

This method will use a (typically) 256 byte table and a lookup that reduces to something like the following in gcc:

checkX:
        movslq  %edi, %rdi  # x, x
        cmpb    $0, C.2.1300(%rdi)      #, C.2
        setne   %al   #, tmp93
        ret

NOTE: Clang doesn't fare as well on the lookup table in this method because it sets up const tables that occur inside functions on the stack on each function call, so you would want to use INIT_10 to initialize a static const unsigned char [UCHAR_MAX+1] outside of the function to achieve similar optimization to gcc.

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