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I was given an assignement to make a program that that takes a positive int and displays its prime factors.

I observed that when giving numbers bigger than 500000, my program takes a lot of time to find the prime factors.

In the end, i failed, because, when given the integer 776621, the program took longer than 10 seconds to count the results. I would like to find out how to optimize my code, so that it would give results faster. Here's my code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int ft_isprime(int num)
{
    int i;
    int j;

    i = 0;
    j = 2;
    if (num <= 1 && num >= 0)
        return (0);
    if (num >= 2 && num <= 3)
        return (1);
    while (j < num)
    {
        if (num % j == 0)
            return (0);
        j++;
    }
    return (1);
}
int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    int num;
    int divisor;
    int prime_divisors[30];
    int i;

    i = 0;
    num = 0;
    if (argc == 2)
        num = atoi(argv[1]);
    divisor = num;
    if (argc != 2)
    {
        printf("\n");
        return (0);
    }
    if (num == 1)
    {
        printf("1\n");
        return (0);
    }
    if (ft_isprime(num))
    {
        printf("%d\n", num);
        return (0);
    }
    while (num > 0 && divisor > 0)
    {
        if (ft_isprime(divisor))
        {
            if (num % divisor == 0)
            {
                num = num / divisor;
                prime_divisors[i] = divisor;
                i++;
                continue;
            }
        }
        divisor--;
    }
    while (i > 0)
    {
        if (i == 1)
            printf("%d", prime_divisors[i-1]);
        else
            printf("%d*", prime_divisors[i-1]);
        i--;
    }
    printf("\n");
    return (0);
}

Example of output:

$> ./fprime 225225 | cat -e
3*3*5*5*7*11*13$
$> ./fprime 8333325 | cat -e
3*3*5*5*7*11*13*37$
$> ./fprime 9539 | cat -e
9539$
$> ./fprime 804577 | cat -e
804577$
$> ./fprime 42 | cat -e
2*3*7$
$> ./fprime 1 | cat -e
1$
$> ./fprime | cat -e
$
$> ./fprime 42 21 | cat -e
$

closed as off-topic by Iharob Al Asimi, Daniel Jour, Eugene Sh., Peter G., user5735775 Aug 27 '16 at 16:20

  • This question does not appear to be about programming within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 2
    Are you aware that the prime factorization problem is considered to be hard? And the whole modern cryptography is relying on this assumption? – Eugene Sh. Aug 25 '16 at 19:41
  • 5
    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's about optimizing working code, which is more suitable at codereview.stackexchange.com – Daniel Jour Aug 25 '16 at 19:42
  • 1
    It's not really a question of optimizing your code; the compiler will take care of that for you. You need to optimize is your thinking; to think about how to design a better algorithm. You should avoid doing unnecessary computations (obvious, I know). For example, you check every a trial divisor for primality, but is it necessary? Suppose you start with 2 and then proceed with larger numbers. Once you remove all the 2s, could any even number divide what's left? Once you remove all the 3s, could any multiple of 3 be a factor? So do you really care if a trial divisor is prime? – rici Aug 25 '16 at 20:04
  • 1
    Also, if you're trying potential divisors sequentially from 2 on up, you can stop checking when you reach ceil(sqrt(num)). – Mark Plotnick Aug 25 '16 at 20:29
1

Here's an implementation that runs a little faster:

#include <vector>

using namespace std;

bool isPrime(int n) {
  if (n == 1) {
    return false;
  }

  for (int i = 2; i <= sqrt(n); i++) {
    if (n % i == 0) {
      return false;
    }
  }

  return true;
}

vector<int> getPrimeFactors(int n) {
  if (n == 1) {
    return vector<int>();
  } else if (isPrime(n)) {
    return vector<int>(1, n);
  }

  vector<int> primeFactors;
  while(n > 1) {
    // find next factor
    int factor = 2;
    for (factor = 2; factor <= sqrt(n); factor++) {
      if (n % factor == 0) {
        break;
      }
    }

    // remove as many factors as possible
    while (n % factor == 0 && n > 1) {
      n /= factor;
      primeFactors.push_back(factor);
    }

    if (isPrime(n)) {
      primeFactors.push_back(n);
      n = 0;
    }
  }

  return primeFactors;
}
  • 1
    Thank you, the idea with the sqrt improved the runtime by 2400% when passing the integer 1492002. – Cornul11 Aug 26 '16 at 15:54

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