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I am working on this hackerrank challenge in JS and I am implementing an insertion sort. With my solution it works with smaller arrays but it isn't working with bigger arrays 100+ indexes. I cannot figure out why my implementation isn't working. I have searched around on the internet and most insertion sorts are implemented the same as mine. Here is the code I am using:

function processData(input) {
    //Enter your code here
    input = input.split("\n");
    var array = input[1].split(" ");
    insertionSort(array);
} 

function insertionSort(array){
    for(var i=1; i<array.length; i++){
        for(var j=i; j>0; j--){
            if(array[j-1] > array[j]){
                var temp = array[j-1];
                array[j-1] = array[j];
                array[j] = temp;
            }
        }
        console.log(array.toString().replace(/,/g," "));
    }
}

Edit: Here is an example that the function is failing to sort.

Input:

406 157 415 318 472 46 252 187 364 481 450 90 390 35 452 74 196 312 142 160 143 220 483 392 443 488 79 234 68 150 356 496 69 88 177 12 288 120 222 270 441 422 103 321 65 316 448 331 117 183 184 128 323 141 467 31 172 48 95 359 239 209 398 99 440 171 86 233 293 162 121 61 317 52 54 273 30 226 421 64 204 444 418 275 263 108 10 149 497 20 97 136 139 200 266 238 493 22 17 39

Output:

10 103 108 117 12 120 121 128 136 139 141 142 143 149 150 157 160 162 17 171 172 177 183 184 187 196 20 200 204 209 22 220 222 226 233 234 238 239 252 263 266 270 273 275 288 293 30 31 312 316 317 318 321 323 331 35 356 359 364 39 390 392 398 406 415 418 421 422 440 441 443 444 448 450 452 46 467 472 48 481 483 488 493 496 497 52 54 61 64 65 68 69 74 79 86 88 90 95 97 99

  • Can you provide a failing example? – user1470500 Aug 25 '16 at 23:23
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    look closer at your inner for loop. It contains an if statement. Would you expect it to ever happen that the if statement is true on some iterations of the loop, then false on some, then true again? Or would you expect that once the if statement starts returning false, it will never again return true? – Hamms Aug 25 '16 at 23:23
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    Isn't the problem that you are sorting strings? – jeff carey Aug 25 '16 at 23:44
  • @Hamms I am not sure I am following, sorry my brain is a bit mush after trying to figure this out. – Christopher Stephenson Aug 25 '16 at 23:45
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    @jeffcarey you are right. I changed the if statement to the parse the int on both sides and it worked. I feel so foolish for not realizing that. – Christopher Stephenson Aug 25 '16 at 23:58
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I've participated in many competitive programming contests, including one or two on Hackerrank.

Firstly, I doubt that memory is a problem. From what I can see, you use a linear amount of memory and since the size of the array is at most 1000, there's no way you could exceed a few MB.

Secondly, I doubt there is a wrong answer problem, since the algorithm looks correct.

This leaves us with only one potential issue: time limit exceeded. This can be due to various reasons, the first that comes to mind is the used language. As far as I know, Hackerrank has the same time limit per test, regardless of the programming language. Since the problem is from the algorithmic domain, it is highly likely the time limit was calibrated after a model solution written in C/C++, which is a compiled and fast language, compared to Javascript, which is interpreted. On other platforms, sometimes, it is mentioned that because time limits are calibrated according to C++ model solutions, it may or may not be possible to fit in the time limit if you use a different language.

If you really want to solve this in Javascript, you will need to perform micro-optimizations. Two which I noticed are putting a break statement when a[j] > a[j - 1] (it is senseless to check further, since prefixes are already sorted) and optimizing the console.log operations. Generally, IO operations are the most expensive in all languages. Try to buffer into a string all intermediate arrays (1 million small numbers, should fit in ~5-6MB, so memory is not a problem), dropping to a single call to console.log.

Also, I don't know how efficient is the replace method on strings, especially if regular expressionsare used, even if very simple ones. Because you're using an interpreted language and the time limit is tight, even if in real-world applications the difference would be unsignificant, in this case, we need to squeeze as much CPU time as possible, and even a 1.5 constant can be significant. Try to concatenate the numbers to the string yourself. Even better, preprocess the string representations of all numbers from -10000 to 10000 into an array of strings and concatenate those instead. It is likely that "toString" is not optimized for integers and performs many modulo operations, which are expensive and can become a bottleneck when you perform it millions of times.

Try out these optimizations and let us know if you worked it out!

Edit: sorry, I didn't notice in the comments that you received wrong answer because you didn't parse the array correctly. I can delete the answer if you want.

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