12

What I'm doing and what's wrong

When I click on a button, a slider shows up. (here is an example of what it looks like, do not pay attention to this code)

The slider shows via an animation. When the animation is finished I should include an HTML page I've loaded from the server. I need to apply the HTML in the slider after the animation otherwise the animation stops (the DOM is recalculated).

My algorithm

  1. Start the request to get the HTML to display inside the slider
  2. Start the animation
  3. Wait the data to be ready and the transition to be finished

    Why? If I apply the HTML during the animation, it stops the animation while the new HTML is added to the DOM. So I wait for both to end before step 4.

  4. Apply the HTML inside the slider

Here is the shortened code:

// Start loading data & animate transition
var count = 0;
var data = null;

++count;
$.get(url, function (res) {
    data = res;
    cbSlider();
});

// Animation starts here

++count;
$(document).on('transitionend', '#' + sliderId, function () {
    $(document).off('transitionend', '#' + sliderId);
    cbSlider()
});

function cbSlider() {
    --count;
    // This condition is only correct when both GET request and animation are finished
    if (count == 0) {
        // Attempt to enforce the frame to finish (doesn't work)
        window.requestAnimationFrame(() => { return });

        $('#' + sliderId + ' .slider-content').html(data);
    }
}

The detailed issue

transitionend is called too early. It makes the last animated frame a lot too long (477.2ms) and the last frame is not rendered at transitionend event.

Google Chrome Timeline

From the Google documentation, I can tell you that the Paint and Composite step of the Pixel Pipeline is called after the Event(transitionend):

Pixel Pipe Line

Maybe I'm overthinking this.

How should I handle this kind of animations?

How can I wait the animation to be fully finished and rendered?

  • Can you explain how count is being used - normally counters are for loops, not clear what they are doing for you here. – staypuftman Aug 26 '16 at 13:08
  • The variable count is used to ensure the callback cbSlider is only executed once, after both the GET request and the animation has ended (via the event transisionend). I increment count once before the request and once before the event is listening. Those two parts are calling the same callback cbSlider. In the cbSlider function I decrement the count variable once at every call. It is called twice, the second time it will be called the condition will be correct and it will execute. Does that make sense ? – Elfayer Aug 26 '16 at 13:19
  • I'm not necessarily saying what you are doing is wrong but I wouldn't use a counter for this. I'd probably use .ajax() instead of .get(), and make the success parameter of .ajax() the animation, so it only happens once the request is successful. I could code up what I'm think if you want to see it. – staypuftman Aug 26 '16 at 13:52
  • @staypuftman That's not a good idea. If the request takes 5s, you won't have any visual feedback during 5s... – Elfayer Aug 26 '16 at 13:57
  • 2
    I think the op is not complaining about time, but only asking how to add his data after the end of the frame rendering. Not when transitionend event is raised, but when the render of the frame is done and printed to screen. – Guillaume Beauvois Aug 26 '16 at 14:21
2
+50

I'm not sure why transitionend is fired before the last frame has rendered, but in this (very crude) test it seems that a setTimeout does help...

The first example shows how the html calculation and injection happens too early. The second example wraps the long running method in a setTimeout and doesn't seem to trigger any interuption in the animation.

Example 1: reproduction of your problem

var ended = 0;
var cb = function() {
  ended += 1;

  if (ended == 2) {
    $(".animated").html(createLongHTMLString());
  }
}

$(".load").click(function() {
  $(".animated").addClass("loading");
  $(".animated").on("transitionend", cb);
  setTimeout(cb, 100);
});

function createLongHTMLString() {
  var str = "";
  for (var i = 0; i < 100000; i += 1) {
    str += "<em>Test </em>";
  }
  return str;
};
.animated,
.target {
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  position: absolute;
  text-align: center;
  line-height: 100px;
  overflow: hidden;
}
.target,
.animated.loading {
  transform: translateX(300%);
}
.animated {
  background: green;
  z-index: 1;
  transition: transform .2s linear;
}
.target {
  background: red;
  z-index: 0;
}
.wrapper {
  height: 100px;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

<div class="wrapper">
  <div class="animated">Loading</div>
  <div class="target"></div>
</div>

<button class="load">load</button>

Example 2: in which a setTimeout seems to fix it

With a setTimeout around the html injection code.

var ended = 0;
var cb = function() {
  ended += 1;

  if (ended == 2) {
    setTimeout(function() {
      $(".animated").html(createLongHTMLString());
    });
  }
}

$(".load").click(function() {
  $(".animated").addClass("loading");
  $(".animated").on("transitionend", cb);
  setTimeout(cb, 100);
});

function createLongHTMLString() {
  var str = "";
  for (var i = 0; i < 100000; i += 1) {
    str += "<em>Test </em>";
  }
  return str;
};
.animated,
.target {
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  position: absolute;
  text-align: center;
  line-height: 100px;
  overflow: hidden;
}
.target,
.animated.loading {
  transform: translateX(300%);
}
.animated {
  background: green;
  z-index: 1;
  transition: transform .2s linear;
}
.target {
  background: red;
  z-index: 0;
}
.wrapper {
  height: 100px;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

<div class="wrapper">
  <div class="animated">Loading</div>
  <div class="target"></div>
</div>

<button class="load">load</button>

  • Actually it doesn't work in my case. I have to put a setTimeout of 10 or 100 ms to make it work. It doesn't wait the frame to render. – Elfayer Sep 5 '16 at 8:32
  • 2
    Have you made sure the transitionend event is coming from the right property? You can check the property through event.originalEvent.propertyName. In the example above, you'd want to make sure it's the transform property. – user3297291 Sep 5 '16 at 8:38
0

Well, if transitions are not working for you the way you want to, you can go back a few years and use jQuery animations instead?

(function(slider){
    $.get(url, function (res) {
        slider.animate({
            // put whatever animations you need here
            left: "5%",
        }, 5000, function() {
            // Animation complete.
            slider.find('.slider-content').html(res);
        });
    });
}($('#' + sliderId)));

You can also start both actions at the same time, and then add the html to the document only after the animation has finished and the request is complete, but that would require a flag.

(function(slider){

    // whether the animation is finished
    var finished = false;

    // whether the html has been added already
    var added = false;

    // your html data
    var html = null;

    function add() {
        if (finished && html && !added) {

            // make sure function will only add html once
            added = true;

            slider.find('.slider-content').html(html);
        }
    }

    $.get(url, function (res) {
        html = res;
        add();
    });

    slider.animate({
        // put whatever animations you need here
        left: "5%",
    }, 5000, function() {
        // Animation complete.
        finished = true;
        add();
    });

}($('#' + sliderId)));

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