I had nested partially specialized template code working with VS 2015 until I discovered that it was not standards-compliant. I want it to be so I twisted my code to overcome the former issue and also that one and have now hit a hard wall.

Using variadic templates and partial specialization I would like to fill an array at compile-time given a fixed set of parameters.

What I want to achieve also seems similar to this answer but I did not manage to make it work.

Consider the following program:

#include <cstdlib>

template <typename T, std::size_t Size>
struct Array;

template <typename T, std::size_t Size, std::size_t Iteration, typename ...Args>
struct ArrayFiller {
    inline
    static void fill(Array<T, Size>& a, const Args&... args) {
        ArrayFiller<T, Size, Iteration, Args...>::fill_recursive(a, args...);
    }

    inline
    static void fill_recursive(Array<T, Size>& a, const T& i, const Args&... args) {
        a.data[Size - Iteration - 1] = i;
        ArrayFiller<T, Size, Iteration - 1>::fill_recursive(a, args...);
    }
};

template <typename T, std::size_t Size>
struct ArrayFiller<T, Size, 0> {
    inline
    static void fill_recursive(Array<T, Size>& a, const T& i) {
        a.data[Size - 1] = i;
    }
};

template <typename T, std::size_t Size>
struct Array {
    T data[Size];

    template <typename ...Args>
    Array(const Args&... args) {
        ArrayFiller<T, Size, Size - 1, Args...>::fill(*this, args...);
    }
};

int main() {
    Array<int, 2> c(42, -18);
    return 0;
}

...and the beginning of its g++ -std=c++14 -pedantic -Wall -Wextra output (as of version 5.3.0):

main.cpp: In instantiation of ‘static void ArrayFiller<T, Size, Iteration, Args>::fill(Array<T, Size>&, const Args& ...) [with T = int; long unsigned int Size = 2ul; long unsigned int Iteration = 1ul; Args = {int, int}]’:
main.cpp:34:54:   required from ‘Array<T, Size>::Array(const Args& ...) [with Args = {int, int}; T = int; long unsigned int Size = 2ul]’
main.cpp:39:28:   required from here
main.cpp:10:65: error: no matching function for call to ‘ArrayFiller<int, 2ul, 1ul, int, int>::fill_recursive(Array<int, 2ul>&, const int&, const int&)’
         ArrayFiller<T, Size, Iteration, Args...>::fill_recursive(a, args...);
                                                                 ^
main.cpp:14:17: note: candidate: static void ArrayFiller<T, Size, Iteration, Args>::fill_recursive(Array<T, Size>&, const T&, const Args& ...) [with T = int; long unsigned int Size = 2ul; long unsigned int Iteration = 1ul; Args = {int, int}]
     static void fill_recursive(Array<T, Size>& a, const T& i, const Args&... args) {
                 ^
main.cpp:14:17: note:   candidate expects 4 arguments, 3 provided

Basically the compiler complains that there is no matching function because from what I understand the parameter pack is expanded either too "soon" or too "late" in my logic: the const T& i argument in the recursive call messes up the expansion.

How would you fix it?

I am also interested in alternate / better / cleaner solutions.

  • 2
    Why do you need variadic template, when constexpr constructor with initializer list would do? – SergeyA Aug 26 '16 at 15:44
  • Yeah, I'm not sure why you're not just using std::array, which supports precisely this syntax... This isn't "filling" an array, which implies generating values; it's just initialising it from values provided. And when the C++ Standard Library has already provided the wheel you seemingly need, it's usually a bad idea to try to reinvent it yourself. – underscore_d Aug 26 '16 at 15:46
  • @SergeyA: could you please elaborate? Is it what Vittorio's answer is about? Sorry I'm not as comfortable with C++ as with other tools. – dummydev Aug 26 '16 at 15:58
  • 1
    @underscore_d: well, this is a minimal example for SO but basically the real use case offers more bloa...functionality than just holding some values together. – dummydev Aug 26 '16 at 15:58
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Is a solution not based on template recursion acceptable in your use case? wandbox link

template <typename T, std::size_t Size>
struct Array {
    T data[Size];

    template <typename ...Args>
    constexpr Array(const Args&... args) : data{args...} {

    }
};

int main() {
    Array<int, 2> c(42, -18);
    assert(c.data[0] == 42);
    assert(c.data[1] == -18);

    constexpr Array<int, 2> cc(42, -18);
    static_assert(cc.data[0] == 42);
    static_assert(cc.data[1] == -18);
}
  • Thank you Vittorio, this has been an eye opener. I added a public setter that simply does *this = Array(args...); to fit my needs. – dummydev Aug 29 '16 at 10:52

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