I have services that are derived from same interface

public interface IService
{
}

public class ServiceA : IService
{
}

public class ServiceB : IService
{    
}

public class ServiceC : IService
{    
}

Typically other IOC containers like Unity allow you to register concrete implementations by some Key that distinguishes them.

In Asp.Net Core how do I register these services and resolve it at runtime based on some key?

I don't see any of the Add Service method takes key or name parameter that typically used to distinguish the concrete implementation.

    public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {            
         // How do I register services here of the same interface            
    }


    public MyController:Controller
    {
       public void DoSomeThing(string key)
       { 
          // How do get service based on key
       }
    }

Is the Factory pattern the only option here?

Update1
I have gone though the article here that shows how to use factory pattern to get service instances when we have multiple concreate implementation. However it is still not complete solution. when I call _serviceProvider.GetService() method I cannot inject data into constructor. For example consider this example

public class ServiceA : IService
{
     private string _efConnectionString;
     ServiceA(string efconnectionString)
     {
       _efConnecttionString = efConnectionString;
     } 
}

public class ServiceB : IService
{    
   private string _mongoConnectionString;
   public ServiceB(string mongoConnectionString)
   {
      _mongoConnectionString = mongoConnectionString;
   }
}

public class ServiceC : IService
{    
    private string _someOtherConnectionString
    public ServiceC(string someOtherConnectionString)
    {
      _someOtherConnectionString = someOtherConnectionString;
    }
}

How can _serviceProvider.GetService() inject appropriate connection string? In Unity or any other IOC we can do that at the time of type registration. I can use IOption however that will require me to inject all settings, I cannot inject a particular connectionstring into the service.

Also note that I am trying to avoid using other containers (including Unity) because then I have to register everything else ( eg Controllers) with new container as well.

Also using factory pattern to create service instance is against DIP as factory increases the number of dependencies a client is forced to depend upon details here

So I think the default DI in ASP.NET core missing 2 things
1>Register instances using key
2>Inject static data into constructor during registration

  • 2
    Possible duplicate of Dependency injection resolving by name – adem caglin Aug 27 '16 at 5:35
  • 1
    There is finally an extension in nuget for name-based registrations, hope it can help – neleus Jun 15 '17 at 21:37
  • Hi, sorry for my stupid question, but I'm about new with Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection ... do you think that create 3 empty interfaces that extend Iservice like "public interface IServiceA : IService" and than "public class ServiceA : IServiceA" ... could be a good practice option? – Emiliano Magliocca Aug 8 '17 at 9:53

13 Answers 13

up vote 76 down vote accepted

I did a simple workaround using Func when I found myself in this situation.

services.AddTransient<ServiceA>();
services.AddTransient<ServiceB>();
services.AddTransient<ServiceC>();

services.AddTransient<Func<string, IService>>(serviceProvider => key =>
{
    switch(key)
    {
        case "A":
            return serviceProvider.GetService<ServiceA>();
        case "B":
            return serviceProvider.GetService<ServiceB>();
        case "C":
            return serviceProvider.GetService<ServiceC>();
        default:
            throw new KeyNotFoundException(); // or maybe return null, up to you
    }
});

And use it from any class registered with DI like:

public class Consumer
{
    private readonly Func<string, IService> _serviceAccessor;

    public Consumer(Func<string, IService> serviceAccessor)
    {
        _serviceAccessor = serviceAccesor;
    }

    public void UseServiceA()
    {
        //use _serviceAccessor field to resolve desired type
        _serviceAccessor("A").DoIServiceOperation();
    }
}

UPDATE

Keep in mind that in this example the key for resolution is a string, for the sake of simplicity and because OP was asking for this case in particular.

But you could use any custom resolution type as key, as you do not usually want a huge n-case switch rotting your code. Depends on how your app scales.

  • 1
    @MatthewStevenMonkan updated my answer with an example – Miguel A. Arilla Jul 12 '17 at 21:32
  • 1
    Using a factory pattern like this is the best way to go. Thanks for sharing! – Sergey Akopov Aug 10 '17 at 19:36
  • 2
    +1 Very neat and clean, because when we use other di-container we have to include their package whenever we need to resolve dependencies, eg. ILifetimeScope in AutoFac. – Anupam Singh Jan 18 at 11:47
  • 1
    @AnupamSingh In my opinion, most kind of small to medium applications running on .NET Core do not need any DI framework, just adds complexity and unwanted dependencies, the beauty and simplicity of the built-in DI is more than enough, and it can also be extended with ease. – Miguel A. Arilla Jan 18 at 16:42
  • 1
    While it seems @Miguel A. Arilla has point it out clearly, I created on top of his useful solution another solution which looks neat but requires alot more work. It definitely depends on the above solution. – Assil Jun 1 at 9:51

Another option is to use the extension method GetServices from Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection.

Register your services as:

services.AddSingleton<IService, ServiceA>();
services.AddSingleton<IService, ServiceB>();
services.AddSingleton<IService, ServiceC>();

Then resolve with a little of Linq:

var services = serviceProvider.GetServices<IService>();
var serviceB = services.First(o => o.GetType() == typeof(ServiceB));

or

var serviceZ = services.First(o => o.Name.Equals("Z"));

(assuming that IService has a string property called "Name")

Make sure to have using Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection;

Update

AspNet 2.1 source: GetServices

  • In your code, if I resolved only one service, not services, which one will be returned? The service I registered first or late? – Mohammed Noureldin Dec 31 '17 at 2:08
  • 4
    Not sure, but I think it isn't deterministic. Any results you get today may change tomorrow, it seems not a good practice. – Emanuel Ve Dec 31 '17 at 5:31
  • 1
    upvote to the link for GetServices, which showed me that you can request a list of services a dependent service by requesting IEnumerable<IService> – johnny 5 Mar 12 at 5:22
  • 2
    Could you show example of usage in Controller? – alerya Jul 22 at 8:50
  • 2
    serviceProvider.GetServices<IService>() will instantiate each of ServiceA, ServiceB and ServiceC. You would like to call constructor of only one service - the one that you actually need. This is a big problem if implementations are not light weight or you have many implementations of IService (for example, you have auto-generated implementations of IRepository for each model). – Uros Aug 23 at 9:59

It is not supported by Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection.

But you can plug-in another dependency injection mechanism, like StructureMap See it's Home page and it's GitHub Project.

It's not hard at all:

  1. Add a dependency to StructureMap in your project.json:

    "Structuremap.Microsoft.DependencyInjection" : "1.0.1",
    
  2. Inject it into the ASP.NET pipeline inside ConfigureServices and register your classes (see docs)

    public IServiceProvider ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services) // returns IServiceProvider !
    {
        // Add framework services.
        services.AddMvc();
        services.AddWhatever();
    
        //using StructureMap;
        var container = new Container();
        container.Configure(config =>
        {
            // Register stuff in container, using the StructureMap APIs...
            config.For<IPet>().Add(new Cat("CatA")).Named("A");
            config.For<IPet>().Add(new Cat("CatB")).Named("B");
            config.For<IPet>().Use("A"); // Optionally set a default
            config.Populate(services);
        });
    
        return container.GetInstance<IServiceProvider>();
    }
    
  3. Then, to get a named instance, you will need to request the IContainer

    public class HomeController : Controller
    {
        public HomeController(IContainer injectedContainer)
        {
            var myPet = injectedContainer.GetInstance<IPet>("B");
            string name = myPet.Name; // Returns "CatB"
    

That's it.

For the example to build, you need

    public interface IPet
    {
        string Name { get; set; }
    }

    public class Cat : IPet
    {
        public Cat(string name)
        {
            Name = name;
        }

        public string Name {get; set; }
    }
  • I've tried this approach, but I get runtime errors on my controller because IContainer is not found in the build plans. Is there anything I must to to require IContainer to be auto-injected? – mohrtan Mar 16 '17 at 17:06
  • BTW, I'm using StructureMap.Micorosoft.DependencyInjection 1.3.0. – mohrtan Mar 16 '17 at 17:07
  • Are you returning the new container in ConfigureServices? – Gerardo Grignoli Mar 16 '17 at 21:50
  • I'm returning the new container's IServiceProviderInstance as indicated in step #2 above. I copied that exactly only changing it for my types. This is a good solution and is working perfectly. The only drawback is that I'm unable to use an injected container and am resorting to a static container, which I don't want to do. – mohrtan Mar 17 '17 at 23:41
  • 1
    Its works for me thanks GerardoGrignoli. @mohrtan the sample code is here if you are still looking into this. github.com/Yawarmurtaza/AspNetCoreStructureMap – Yawar Murtaza Apr 11 '17 at 21:41

I've faced the same issue and want to share how I solved it and why.

As you mentioned there are two problems. The first:

In Asp.Net Core how do I register these services and resolve it at runtime based on some key?

So what options do we have? Folks suggest two:

  • Use a custom factory (like _myFactory.GetServiceByKey(key))

  • Use another DI engine (like _unityContainer.Resolve<IService>(key))

Is the Factory pattern the only option here?

In fact both options are factories because each IoC Container is also a factory (highly configurable and complicated though). And it seems to me that other options are also variations of the Factory pattern.

So what option is better then? Here I agree with @Sock who suggested using custom factory, and that is why.

First, I always try to avoid adding new dependencies when they are not really needed. So I agree with you in this point. Moreover, using two DI frameworks is worse than creating custom factory abstraction. In the second case you have to add new package dependency (like Unity) but depending on a new factory interface is less evil here. The main idea of ASP.NET Core DI, I believe, is simplicity. It maintains a minimal set of features following KISS principle. If you need some extra feature then DIY or use a corresponding Plungin that implements desired feature (Open Closed Principle).

Secondly, often we need to inject many named dependencies for single service. In case of Unity you may have to specify names for constructor parameters (using InjectionConstructor). This registration uses reflection and some smart logic to guess arguments for the constructor. This also may lead to runtime errors if registration does not match the constructor arguments. From the other hand, when using your own factory you have full control of how to provide the constructor parameters. It's more readable and it's resolved at compile-time. KISS principle again.

The second problem:

How can _serviceProvider.GetService() inject appropriate connection string?

First, I agree with you that depending on new things like IOptions (and therefore on package Microsoft.Extensions.Options.ConfigurationExtensions) is not a good idea. I've seen some discussing about IOptions where there were different opinions about its benifit. Again, I try to avoid adding new dependencies when they are not really needed. Is it really needed? I think no. Otherwise each implementation would have to depend on it without any clear need coming from that implementation (for me it looks like violation of ISP, where I agree with you too). This is also true about depending on the factory but in this case it can be avoided.

The ASP.NET Core DI provides a very nice overload for that purpose:

var mongoConnection = //...
var efConnection = //...
var otherConnection = //...
services.AddTransient<IMyFactory>(
             s => new MyFactoryImpl(
                 mongoConnection, efConnection, otherConnection, 
                 s.GetService<ISomeDependency1>(), s.GetService<ISomeDependency2>())));
  • Hi, sorry for my stupid question, but I'm about new with Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection ... do you think that create 3 interfaces that extend Iservice like "public interface IServiceA : IService" and than "public class ServiceA : IServiceA" ... could be a good practice option? – Emiliano Magliocca Aug 3 '17 at 15:42
  • 1
    @emiliano-magliocca In general, you should not depend on interfaces that you dont use (ISP), IServiceA in your case. Since you're using methods from IService only, you should have dependency to IService only. – neleus Nov 21 '17 at 12:43
  • 1
    @cagatay-kalan In case of OP's question he can easily achieve his goal with ASP.NET Core DI. No need for other DI frameworks. – neleus Nov 21 '17 at 12:49
  • 1
    @EmilianoMagliocca It can be easily solved this way: services.AddTransient<MyFirstClass>( s => new MyFirstClass(s.GetService<Escpos>())); for the first class and services.AddTransient<MySecondClass>( s => new MySecondClass(s.GetService<Usbpos>())); for the second one. – neleus Jan 19 at 15:25
  • 1
    @EmilianoMagliocca in my example both ‘MyFirstClass‘ and ‘MySecondClass‘ have the same ctor parameter of interface type which both Escpos and Usbpos implement. So code above only instructs IoC container how to instanciate ‘MyFirstClass‘ and ‘MySecondClass‘. Nothing more. So in addition you may need to map some other interface(s) to ‘MyFirstClass‘ and ‘MySecondClass‘. It depends on your needs and I didn't covered it in my example. – neleus Jan 23 at 20:42

You're correct, the built in ASP.NET Core container does not have the concept of registering multiple services and then retrieving a specific one, as you suggest, a factory is the only real solution in that case.

Alternatively, you could switch to a third party container like Unity or StructureMap that does provide the solution you need (documented here: https://docs.asp.net/en/latest/fundamentals/dependency-injection.html?#replacing-the-default-services-container).

Apparently, you can just inject IEnumerable of your service interface! And then find the instance that you want using LINQ.

My example is for the AWS SNS service but you can do the same for any injected service really.

Startup

foreach (string snsRegion in Configuration["SNSRegions"].Split(',', StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries))
{
    services.AddAWSService<IAmazonSimpleNotificationService>(
        string.IsNullOrEmpty(snsRegion) ? null :
        new AWSOptions()
        {
            Region = RegionEndpoint.GetBySystemName(snsRegion)
        }
    );
}

services.AddSingleton<ISNSFactory, SNSFactory>();

services.Configure<SNSConfig>(Configuration);

SNSConfig

public class SNSConfig
{
    public string SNSDefaultRegion { get; set; }
    public string SNSSMSRegion { get; set; }
}

appsettings.json

  "SNSRegions": "ap-south-1,us-west-2",
  "SNSDefaultRegion": "ap-south-1",
  "SNSSMSRegion": "us-west-2",

SNS Factory

public class SNSFactory : ISNSFactory
{
    private readonly SNSConfig _snsConfig;
    private readonly IEnumerable<IAmazonSimpleNotificationService> _snsServices;

    public SNSFactory(
        IOptions<SNSConfig> snsConfig,
        IEnumerable<IAmazonSimpleNotificationService> snsServices
        )
    {
        _snsConfig = snsConfig.Value;
        _snsServices = snsServices;
    }

    public IAmazonSimpleNotificationService ForDefault()
    {
        return GetSNS(_snsConfig.SNSDefaultRegion);
    }

    public IAmazonSimpleNotificationService ForSMS()
    {
        return GetSNS(_snsConfig.SNSSMSRegion);
    }

    private IAmazonSimpleNotificationService GetSNS(string region)
    {
        return GetSNS(RegionEndpoint.GetBySystemName(region));
    }

    private IAmazonSimpleNotificationService GetSNS(RegionEndpoint region)
    {
        IAmazonSimpleNotificationService service = _snsServices.FirstOrDefault(sns => sns.Config.RegionEndpoint == region);

        if (service == null)
        {
            throw new Exception($"No SNS service registered for region: {region}");
        }

        return service;
    }
}

public interface ISNSFactory
{
    IAmazonSimpleNotificationService ForDefault();

    IAmazonSimpleNotificationService ForSMS();
}

Now you can get the SNS service for the region that you want in your custom service or controller

public class SmsSender : ISmsSender
{
    private readonly IAmazonSimpleNotificationService _sns;

    public SmsSender(ISNSFactory snsFactory)
    {
        _sns = snsFactory.ForSMS();
    }

    .......
 }

public class DeviceController : Controller
{
    private readonly IAmazonSimpleNotificationService _sns;

    public DeviceController(ISNSFactory snsFactory)
    {
        _sns = snsFactory.ForDefault();
    }

     .........
}

While it seems @Miguel A. Arilla has pointed it out clearly and I voted up for him, I created on top of his useful solution another solution which looks neat but requires a lot more work.

It definitely depends on the above solution. So basically I created something similar to Func<string, IService>> and I called it IServiceAccessor as an interface and then I had to add a some more extensions to the IServiceCollection as such:

public static IServiceCollection AddSingleton<TService, TImplementation, TServiceAccessor>(
            this IServiceCollection services,
            string instanceName
        )
            where TService : class
            where TImplementation : class, TService
            where TServiceAccessor : class, IServiceAccessor<TService>
        {
            services.AddSingleton<TService, TImplementation>();
            services.AddSingleton<TServiceAccessor>();
            var provider = services.BuildServiceProvider();
            var implementationInstance = provider.GetServices<TService>().Last();
            var accessor = provider.GetServices<TServiceAccessor>().First();

            var serviceDescriptors = services.Where(d => d.ServiceType == typeof(TServiceAccessor));
            while (serviceDescriptors.Any())
            {
                services.Remove(serviceDescriptors.First());
            }

            accessor.SetService(implementationInstance, instanceName);
            services.AddSingleton<TServiceAccessor>(prvd => accessor);
            return services;
        }

The service Accessor looks like:

 public interface IServiceAccessor<TService>
    {
         void Register(TService service,string name);
         TService Resolve(string name);

    }

The end result,you will be able to register services with names or named instances like we used to do with other containers..for instance:

    services.AddSingleton<IEncryptionService, SymmetricEncryptionService, EncyptionServiceAccessor>("Symmetric");
    services.AddSingleton<IEncryptionService, AsymmetricEncryptionService, EncyptionServiceAccessor>("Asymmetric");

That is enough for now, but to make your work complete, it is better to add more extension methods as you can to cover all types of registrations following the same approach.

There was another post on stackoverflow, but I can not find it, where the poster has explained in details why this feature is not supported and how to work around it, basically similar to what @Miguel stated. It was nice post even though I do not agree with each point because I think there are situation where you really need named instances. I will post that link here once I find it again.

As a matter of fact, you do not need to pass that Selector or Accessor:

I am using the following code in my project and it worked well so far.

 /// <summary>
    /// Adds the singleton.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="TService">The type of the t service.</typeparam>
    /// <typeparam name="TImplementation">The type of the t implementation.</typeparam>
    /// <param name="services">The services.</param>
    /// <param name="instanceName">Name of the instance.</param>
    /// <returns>IServiceCollection.</returns>
    public static IServiceCollection AddSingleton<TService, TImplementation>(
        this IServiceCollection services,
        string instanceName
    )
        where TService : class
        where TImplementation : class, TService
    {
        var provider = services.BuildServiceProvider();
        var implementationInstance = provider.GetServices<TService>().LastOrDefault();
        if (implementationInstance.IsNull())
        {
            services.AddSingleton<TService, TImplementation>();
            provider = services.BuildServiceProvider();
            implementationInstance = provider.GetServices<TService>().Single();
        }
        return services.RegisterInternal(instanceName, provider, implementationInstance);
    }

    private static IServiceCollection RegisterInternal<TService>(this IServiceCollection services,
        string instanceName, ServiceProvider provider, TService implementationInstance)
        where TService : class
    {
        var accessor = provider.GetServices<IServiceAccessor<TService>>().LastOrDefault();
        if (accessor.IsNull())
        {
            services.AddSingleton<ServiceAccessor<TService>>();
            provider = services.BuildServiceProvider();
            accessor = provider.GetServices<ServiceAccessor<TService>>().Single();
        }
        else
        {
            var serviceDescriptors = services.Where(d => d.ServiceType == typeof(IServiceAccessor<TService>));
            while (serviceDescriptors.Any())
            {
                services.Remove(serviceDescriptors.First());
            }
        }
        accessor.Register(implementationInstance, instanceName);
        services.AddSingleton<TService>(prvd => implementationInstance);
        services.AddSingleton<IServiceAccessor<TService>>(prvd => accessor);
        return services;
    }

    //
    // Summary:
    //     Adds a singleton service of the type specified in TService with an instance specified
    //     in implementationInstance to the specified Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection.IServiceCollection.
    //
    // Parameters:
    //   services:
    //     The Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection.IServiceCollection to add the service
    //     to.
    //   implementationInstance:
    //     The instance of the service.
    //   instanceName:
    //     The name of the instance.
    //
    // Returns:
    //     A reference to this instance after the operation has completed.
    public static IServiceCollection AddSingleton<TService>(
        this IServiceCollection services,
        TService implementationInstance,
        string instanceName) where TService : class
    {
        var provider = services.BuildServiceProvider();
        return RegisterInternal(services, instanceName, provider, implementationInstance);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Registers an interface for a class
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="TInterface">The type of the t interface.</typeparam>
    /// <param name="services">The services.</param>
    /// <returns>IServiceCollection.</returns>
    public static IServiceCollection As<TInterface>(this IServiceCollection services)
         where TInterface : class
    {
        var descriptor = services.Where(d => d.ServiceType.GetInterface(typeof(TInterface).Name) != null).FirstOrDefault();
        if (descriptor.IsNotNull())
        {
            var provider = services.BuildServiceProvider();
            var implementationInstance = (TInterface)provider?.GetServices(descriptor?.ServiceType)?.Last();
            services?.AddSingleton(implementationInstance);
        }
        return services;
    }
  • This helped solve my problem where I was losing registration of types in the service accessor. The trick was to remove all bindings for the service accessor and then add it again! – Umar Farooq Khawaja Jun 10 at 4:03

My solution for what it's worth... considered switching to Castle Windsor as can't say I liked any of the solutions above. Sorry!!

public interface IStage<out T> : IStage { }

public interface IStage {
      void DoSomething();
}

Create your various implementations

public class YourClassA : IStage<YouClassA> { 
    public void DoSomething() 
    {
        ...TODO
    }
}

public class YourClassB : IStage<YourClassB> { .....etc. }

Registration

services.AddTransient<IStage<YourClassA>, YourClassA>()
services.AddTransient<IStage<YourClassB>, YourClassB>()

Constructor and instance usage...

public class Whatever
{
   private IStage ClassA { get; }

   public Whatever(IStage<YourClassA> yourClassA)
   {
         ClassA = yourClassA;
   }

   public void SomeWhateverMethod()
   {
        ClassA.DoSomething();
        .....
   }

A factory approach is certainly viable. Another approach is to use inheritance to create individual interfaces that inherit from IService, implement the inherited interfaces in your IService implementations, and register the inherited interfaces rather than the base. Whether adding an inheritance hierarchy or factories is the "right" pattern all depends on who you speak to. I often have to use this pattern when dealing with multiple database providers in the same application that uses a generic, such as IRepository<T>, as the foundation for data access.

Example interfaces and implementations:

public interface IService 
{
}

public interface IServiceA: IService
{}

public interface IServiceB: IService
{}

public IServiceC: IService
{}

public class ServiceA: IServiceA 
{}

public class ServiceB: IServiceB
{}

public class ServiceC: IServiceC
{}

Container:

container.Register<IServiceA, ServiceA>();
container.Register<IServiceB, ServiceB>();
container.Register<IServiceC, ServiceC>();

While the out of the box implementation doesn't offer it, here's a sample project that allows you to register named instances, and then inject INamedServiceFactory into your code and pull out instances by name. Unlike other facory solutions here, it will allow you to register multiple instances of same implementation but configured differently

https://github.com/macsux/DotNetDINamedInstances

How about a service for services?

If we had an INamedService interface (with .Name property), we could write an IServiceCollection extension for .GetService(string name), where the extension would take that string parameter, and do a .GetServices() on itself, and in each returned instance, find the instance whose INamedService.Name matches the given name.

Like this:

public interface INamedService
{
    string Name { get; }
}

public static T GetService<T>(this IServiceProvider provider, string serviceName)
    where T : INamedService
{
    var candidates = provider.GetServices<T>();
    return candidates.FirstOrDefault(s => s.Name == serviceName);
}

Therefore, your IMyService must implement INamedService, but you'll get the key-based resolution you want, right?

To be fair, having to even have this INamedService interface seems ugly, but if you wanted to go further and make things more elegant, then a [NamedServiceAttribute("A")] on the implementation/class could be found by the code in this extension, and it'd work just as well. To be even more fair, Reflection is slow, so an optimization may be in order, but honestly that's something the DI engine should've been helping with. Speed and simplicity are each grand contributors to TCO.

All in all, there's no need for an explicit factory, because "finding a named service" is such a reusable concept, and factory classes don't scale as a solution. And a Func<> seems fine, but a switch block is so bleh, and again, you'll be writing Funcs as often as you'd be writing Factories. Start simple, reusable, with less code, and if that turns out not to do it for ya, then go complex.

I just simply inject an IEnumerable

ConfigureServices in Startup.cs

Assembly.GetEntryAssembly().GetTypesAssignableFrom<IService>().ForEach((t)=>
                {
                    services.AddScoped(typeof(IService), t);
                });

Services Folder

public interface IService
{
    string Name { get; set; }
}

public class ServiceA : IService
{
    public string Name { get { return "A"; } }
}

public class ServiceB : IService
{    
    public string Name { get { return "B"; } }
}

public class ServiceC : IService
{    
    public string Name { get { return "C"; } }
}

MyController.cs

public class MyController
{
    private readonly IEnumerable<IService> _services;
    public MyController(IEnumerable<IService> services)
    {
        _services = services;
    }
    public void DoSomething()
    {
        var service = _services.Where(s => s.Name == "A").Single();
    }
...
}

Extensions.cs

    public static List<Type> GetTypesAssignableFrom<T>(this Assembly assembly)
    {
        return assembly.GetTypesAssignableFrom(typeof(T));
    }
    public static List<Type> GetTypesAssignableFrom(this Assembly assembly, Type compareType)
    {
        List<Type> ret = new List<Type>();
        foreach (var type in assembly.DefinedTypes)
        {
            if (compareType.IsAssignableFrom(type) && compareType != type)
            {
                ret.Add(type);
            }
        }
        return ret;
    }

I did something similar sometime ago, and I think that the implementation was nice.

Let's say that you have to process incoming messages, each message has a type, so the common approach here it's to use a switch and do things like this:

@Override
public void messageArrived(String type, Message message) throws Exception {
    switch(type) {
        case "A": do Something with message; break;
        case "B": do Something else with message; break;
        ...
    }
}

We can avoid that switch code, and also we can avoid the need to modify that code each time that a new type is added, following this pattern:

@Override
public void messageArrived(String type, Message message) throws Exception {
     messageHandler.getMessageHandler(type).handle(message);
}

This is nice right? So how we can achieve something like that?

First let's define an annotation and also an interface

@Retention(RUNTIME)
@Target({TYPE})
public @interface MessageHandler {
     String value()
}

public interface Handler {
    void handle(MqttMessage message);
}

and now let's use this annotation in a class:

@MessageHandler("myTopic")
public class MyTopicHandler implements Handler {

    @override
    public void handle(MqttMessage message) {
        // do something with the message
    }
}

The last part it's to write the MessageHandler class, in this class you just need to store in a map all your handlers instances, the key of the map will be the topic name and the value and instance of the class. Basically you getMessageHandler method will look something like:

public Handler getMessageHandler(String topic) {
    if (handlerMap == null) {
        loadClassesFromClassPath(); // This method should load from classpath all the classes with the annotation MessageHandler and build the handlerMap
    }
    return handlerMap.get(topic);
}

The good thing with this solution it's that if you need to add a new handler for a new message, you just need to write the new class, add the annotation to the class and that's all. The rest of the code remains the same because it's generic and it's using reflection to load and create instances.

Hope this helps you a bit.

  • 3
    Asp.net Core does not use Java, why do you write this here? – Pavel Biryukov Apr 6 at 21:17

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