193

I can't seem to get MySQL data to persist if I run $ docker-compose down with the following .yml

version: '2'
services:
  # other services

  data:
    container_name: flask_data
    image: mysql:latest
    volumes:
      - /var/lib/mysql
    command: "true"

  mysql:
    container_name: flask_mysql
    restart: always
    image: mysql:latest
    environment:
      MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD: 'test_pass' # TODO: Change this
      MYSQL_USER: 'test'
      MYSQL_PASS: 'pass'
    volumes_from:
      - data
    ports:
      - "3306:3306"

My understanding is that in my data container using volumes: - /var/lib/mysql maps it to my local machines directory where mysql stores data to the container and because of this mapping the data should persist even if the containers are destroyed. And the mysql container is just a client interface into the db and can see the local directory because of volumes_from: - data

Attempted this answer and it did not work. Docker-Compose Persistent Data Trouble

EDIT

Changed my .yml as shown below and created a the dir ./data but now when I run docker-compose up --build the mysql container wont start throws error saying

  data:
    container_name: flask_data
    image: mysql:latest
    volumes:
      - ./data:/var/lib/mysql
    command: "true"

  mysql:
    container_name: flask_mysql
    restart: always
    image: mysql:latest
    environment:
      MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD: 'test_pass' # TODO: Change this
      MYSQL_USER: 'test'
      MYSQL_PASS: 'pass'
    volumes_from:
      - data
    ports:
      - "3306:3306"


flask_mysql | mysqld: Can't create/write to file '/var/lib/mysql/is_writable' (Errcode: 13 - Permission denied)
flask_mysql | 2016-08-26T22:29:21.182144Z 0 [Warning] TIMESTAMP with implicit DEFAULT value is deprecated. Please use --explicit_defaults_for_timestamp server option (see documentation for more details).
flask_mysql | 2016-08-26T22:29:21.185392Z 0 [ERROR] --initialize specified but the data directory exists and is not writable. Aborting.
1
289

The data container is a superfluous workaround. Data-volumes would do the trick for you. Alter your docker-compose.yml to:

version: '2'
services:
  mysql:
    container_name: flask_mysql
    restart: always
    image: mysql:latest
    environment:
      MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD: 'test_pass' # TODO: Change this
      MYSQL_USER: 'test'
      MYSQL_PASS: 'pass'
    volumes:
      - my-datavolume:/var/lib/mysql
volumes:
  my-datavolume:

Docker will create the volume for you in the /var/lib/docker/volumes folder. This volume persist as long as you are not typing docker-compose down -v

12
  • 23
    Starting with MySQL 5.7.6 there will (again) be permission problems with the mysql Docker image. You can instead use the mariadb Docker image, which works flawlessly with Docker volumes. – Peterino Dec 28 '16 at 20:48
  • 16
    Why do you ever want to store it in var/lib/docker/volumes instead of having directory in your project folder like data/mysql? – The Godfather Aug 16 '18 at 17:28
  • 2
    @TheGodfather My guess would be if you don't want to deploy MySQL data to your production machine; otherwise, that's a very sound idea keeping everything together. – Duncan Mar 16 '19 at 6:09
  • 2
    @TheGodfather - This doesn't answer your question completely, but I was wary about using this solution because I was worried I would inadvertently do a docker-compose down and lose my volume. As it turns out, you have to do docker-compose down -v in order to permanently lose your volume, which made me feel much better about this whole approach. I think a better question may be, why create a directory yourself when docker can take care of it for you entirely? – louhow May 19 '19 at 17:30
  • 4
    @louhow I think because I feel myself more confident when all parts of my app and data are stored somehow together, and I have no dependencies on some volume from somewhere – The Godfather May 21 '19 at 16:52
68

There are 3 ways:

First way

You need specify the directory to store mysql data on your host machine. You can then remove the data container. Your mysql data will be saved on you local filesystem.

Mysql container definition must look like this:

mysql:
  container_name: flask_mysql
  restart: always
  image: mysql:latest
  environment:
    MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD: 'test_pass' # TODO: Change this
    MYSQL_USER: 'test'
    MYSQL_PASS: 'pass'
volumes:
 - /opt/mysql_data:/var/lib/mysql
ports:
  - "3306:3306"

Second way

Would be to commit the data container before typing docker-compose down:

docker commit my_data_container
docker-compose down

Third way

Also you can use docker-compose stop instead of docker-compose down (then you don't need to commit the container)

4
  • Can't I just have volumes: - /var/lib/mysql because it maps HOST:CONTAINER and if you don't specify w/ a colon it maps the same dir? – Adam Aug 26 '16 at 22:17
  • Not. unfortunately in this case docker map this container directory to random host folder like /var/lib/docker/volumes/ec3c543bc92f114c2c568733541e89381881e5a62996d7084e07793f86280535 – Bukharov Sergey Aug 26 '16 at 22:27
  • Okay I thought volumes: - /var/lib/mysql was equivalent to volumes: - /var/lib/mysql:/var/lib/mysql – Adam Aug 26 '16 at 22:33
  • your thrid way will not work because docker does not commit data from volumes to the image. see github.com/moby/moby/issues/6999 – Ohmen May 18 '17 at 6:43
15

You have to create a separate volume for mysql data.

So it will look like this:

volumes_from:
  - data
volumes:
  - ./mysql-data:/var/lib/mysql

And no, /var/lib/mysql is a path inside your mysql container and has nothing to do with a path on your host machine. Your host machine may even have no mysql at all. So the goal is to persist an internal folder from a mysql container.

4
  • Wouldn't this be no different than changing my volumes under the data container to what you put under your volumes and simply had volumes_from: - data for mysql? Also attempted this and thew a new error. Says dir exists but not writable and mysql container will not run. – Adam Aug 26 '16 at 22:29
  • Of course you have to create a local folder with a path ./mysql-data (or whatever you would put before semicolon) – Dmitry Malyshenko Aug 26 '16 at 22:36
  • See my edit. Didn't get it in before you commented. But did create local dir. Looks like there is a permission issue now. – Adam Aug 26 '16 at 22:40
  • ERROR: Service "mysql" mounts volumes from "data", which is not the name of a service or container. – Massimiliano Arione Sep 4 '17 at 9:56
12

Actually this is the path and you should mention a valid path for this to work. If your data directory is in current directory then instead of my-data you should mention ./my-data, otherwise it will give you that error in mysql and mariadb also.

volumes:
 ./my-data:/var/lib/mysql
1
  • Both ways are valid if used correctly. The first, without the path notations is actually a named volume, which should be initialized before it can be used. In docker-compose file, we can have a top-level volumes section to configure the mapping of a name to a specific place on the host. After that the volume can be referenced by its name solely. – user07 Apr 14 at 14:50
10

Adding on to the answer from @Ohmen, you could also add an external flag to create the data volume outside of docker compose. This way docker compose would not attempt to create it. Also you wouldn't have to worry about losing the data inside the data-volume in the event of $ docker-compose down -v. The below example is from the official page.

version: "3.8"

services:
  db:
    image: postgres
    volumes:
      - data:/var/lib/postgresql/data

volumes:
  data:
    external: true
6

first, you need to delete all old mysql data using

docker-compose down -v

after that add two lines in your docker-compose.yml

volumes:
  - mysql-data:/var/lib/mysql

and

volumes:
  mysql-data:

your final docker-compose.yml will looks like

version: '3.1'

services:
  php:
    build:
      context: .
      dockerfile: Dockerfile
    ports:
      - 80:80
    volumes:
      - ./src:/var/www/html/
  db:
    image: mysql
    command: --default-authentication-plugin=mysql_native_password
    restart: always
    environment:
      MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD: example
    volumes:
      - mysql-data:/var/lib/mysql

  adminer:
    image: adminer
    restart: always
    ports:
      - 8080:8080
volumes:
  mysql-data:

after that use this command

docker-compose up -d

now your data will persistent and will not be deleted even after using this command

docker-compose down

extra:- but if you want to delete all data then you will use

docker-compose down -v

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.