328

I am defining a custom error type with Swift 3 syntax and I want to provide a user-friendly description of the error which is returned by the localizedDescription property of the Error object. How can I do it?

public enum MyError: Error {
  case customError

  var localizedDescription: String {
    switch self {
    case .customError:
      return NSLocalizedString("A user-friendly description of the error.", comment: "My error")
    }
  }
}

let error: Error = MyError.customError
error.localizedDescription
// "The operation couldn’t be completed. (MyError error 0.)"

Is there a way for the localizedDescription to return my custom error description ("A user-friendly description of the error.")? Note that the error object here is of type Error and not MyError. I can, of course, cast the object to MyError

(error as? MyError)?.localizedDescription

but is there a way to make it work without casting to my error type?

7 Answers 7

587

As described in the Xcode 8 beta 6 release notes,

Swift-defined error types can provide localized error descriptions by adopting the new LocalizedError protocol.

In your case:

public enum MyError: Error {
    case customError
}

extension MyError: LocalizedError {
    public var errorDescription: String? {
        switch self {
        case .customError:
            return NSLocalizedString("A user-friendly description of the error.", comment: "My error")
        }
    }
}

let error: Error = MyError.customError
print(error.localizedDescription) // A user-friendly description of the error.

You can provide even more information if the error is converted to NSError (which is always possible):

extension MyError : LocalizedError {
    public var errorDescription: String? {
        switch self {
        case .customError:
            return NSLocalizedString("I failed.", comment: "")
        }
    }
    public var failureReason: String? {
        switch self {
        case .customError:
            return NSLocalizedString("I don't know why.", comment: "")
        }
    }
    public var recoverySuggestion: String? {
        switch self {
        case .customError:
            return NSLocalizedString("Switch it off and on again.", comment: "")
        }
    }
}

let error = MyError.customError as NSError
print(error.localizedDescription)        // I failed.
print(error.localizedFailureReason)      // Optional("I don\'t know why.")
print(error.localizedRecoverySuggestion) // Optional("Switch it off and on again.")

By adopting the CustomNSError protocol the error can provide a userInfo dictionary (and also a domain and code). Example:

extension MyError: CustomNSError {

    public static var errorDomain: String {
        return "myDomain"
    }

    public var errorCode: Int {
        switch self {
        case .customError:
            return 999
        }
    }

    public var errorUserInfo: [String : Any] {
        switch self {
        case .customError:
            return [ "line": 13]
        }
    }
}

let error = MyError.customError as NSError

if let line = error.userInfo["line"] as? Int {
    print("Error in line", line) // Error in line 13
}

print(error.code) // 999
print(error.domain) // myDomain
12
  • 13
    Is there a reason why you make MyError an Error first and extend it with LocalizedError later? Is there a difference if you made it a LocalizedError in the first place? Commented Mar 7, 2017 at 9:54
  • 14
    @Gee.E: It makes no difference. It is just a way to organize the code (one extension for each protocol). Compare stackoverflow.com/questions/36263892/…, stackoverflow.com/questions/40502086/…, or natashatherobot.com/using-swift-extensions.
    – Martin R
    Commented Mar 7, 2017 at 10:08
  • 4
    Ah, check. I get what you're saying now. The "Protocol Conformance" section on natashatherobot.com/using-swift-extensions is indeed a good example of what you mean. Thanks! Commented Mar 7, 2017 at 10:12
  • 32
    Beware to type var errorDescription: String? instead of String. There is a bug in the implementation of LocalizedError. See SR-5858. Commented Jan 18, 2018 at 8:58
  • 2
    @ethanhuang13 Even though it's filed as a bug, it doesn't count as a bug. LocalizedError requires the type of errorDescription to be String?, not String. Otherwise, the default implementation ("The operation couldn’t be completed") will be provided. With that said, I appreciate you pointing that out; I've made that mistake myself multiple times. Commented Aug 27, 2020 at 6:12
64

I would also add, if your error has parameters like this

enum NetworkError: LocalizedError {
  case responseStatusError(status: Int, message: String)
}

you can call these parameters in your localized description like this:

extension NetworkError {
  public var errorDescription: String? {
    switch self {
    case let .responseStatusError(status, message):
      return "Error with status \(status) and message \(message) was thrown"
  }
}
0
12

This one worked for me:

NSError(domain: "com.your", code: 0, userInfo: [NSLocalizedDescriptionKey: "Error description"])
11

There are now two Error-adopting protocols that your error type can adopt in order to provide additional information to Objective-C — LocalizedError and CustomNSError. Here's an example error that adopts both of them:

enum MyBetterError : CustomNSError, LocalizedError {
    case oops

    // domain
    static var errorDomain : String { return "MyDomain" }
    // code
    var errorCode : Int { return -666 }
    // userInfo
    var errorUserInfo: [String : Any] { return ["Hey":"Ho"] };

    // localizedDescription
    var errorDescription: String? { return "This sucks" }
    // localizedFailureReason
    var failureReason: String? { return "Because it sucks" }
    // localizedRecoverySuggestion
    var recoverySuggestion: String? { return "Give up" }

}
1
  • 3
    Can you make an edit? Your examples don't help much to understand the value of each. Or just delete it because MartinR's answer offers this exactly...
    – mfaani
    Commented Dec 29, 2018 at 13:29
3

Using a struct can be an alternative. A little bit elegance with static localization:

import Foundation

struct MyError: LocalizedError, Equatable {

   private var description: String!

   init(description: String) {
       self.description = description
   }

   var errorDescription: String? {
       return description
   }

   public static func ==(lhs: MyError, rhs: MyError) -> Bool {
       return lhs.description == rhs.description
   }
}

extension MyError {

   static let noConnection = MyError(description: NSLocalizedString("No internet connection",comment: ""))
   static let requestFailed = MyError(description: NSLocalizedString("Request failed",comment: ""))
}

func throwNoConnectionError() throws {
   throw MyError.noConnection
}

do {
   try throwNoConnectionError()
}
catch let myError as MyError {
   switch myError {
   case .noConnection:
       print("noConnection: \(myError.localizedDescription)")
   case .requestFailed:
       print("requestFailed: \(myError.localizedDescription)")
   default:
      print("default: \(myError.localizedDescription)")
   }
}
2

Here is more elegant solution:

  enum ApiError: String, LocalizedError {

    case invalidCredentials = "Invalid credentials"
    case noConnection = "No connection"

    var localizedDescription: String { return NSLocalizedString(self.rawValue, comment: "") }

  }
3
  • 5
    This may be more elegant at runtime, but the static localization step will fail to extract these strings for translators; you'll see a "Bad entry in file – Argument is not a literal string" error when you run exportLocalizations or genstrings to create your list of translatable text.
    – savinola
    Commented Dec 19, 2017 at 18:06
  • @savinola agree, static localization will not work in such case. Perhaps using switch + case is only option... Commented Dec 20, 2017 at 17:23
  • Using raw values will also prevent the use of associated values for any of your errors Commented Feb 3, 2019 at 18:18
1

enum NetworkError: LocalizedError {
    case noConnection

    public var description: String {
    ///You can switch self here if you have multiple cases.
        return "No internet connection"
    }

    // You need to implement `errorDescription`, not `localizedDescription`.
    public var errorDescription: String? {
        return description
    }
}

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