38

I'm making very simple react app. Yet as I try to invoke method of parent (actually grandparent) component via onChange event, I keep getting Uncaught TypeError: Cannot read property 'props' of undefined.

Here is the component/form that is triggering the event (thus invoking method on binded parent component... Yes I used .bound(this) on the method as I passed it down from parent component via props.).

class MonthsTable extends Component {
  handleChangeOnMonth(e){ 
    this.props.setMonth(e.target.id, e.target.value); // here the method is not found, causing error.
  }
  render(){
    console.log(this.props.setMonth) // here the method is present alright
    return (<form>
      {this.props.months.map((e, i) =>
         <input
          type='number'
          id={i} 
          key={i} // yes I know, bad habit, but in this case it doesn't matter
          value={this.props.months[i]}
          onChange={this.handleChangeOnMonth} />)}
    </form>)
  }
}

Here is how I pass the method as props from most parent (grandparent) component.

<Months setMonth={this.setMonth.bind(this)} />

Here is how I pass the method as props in the parent (the component that is between method owner and method invoker)

<MonthsTable setMonth={this.props.setMonth} />

And finally passed to component (MonthsTable) that you saw first. Wheter it is relevant or not, final (most child) components is displayed depending of if statement which works just fine (Might somehow be relevant, I don't know).

Question is... Why is the (setMonth) method 'invisible' inside of (handleChangeOnMonth) method.

Thanks for any advice.

1
  • Try binding this.handleChangeOnMonth to this too?
    – fnune
    Aug 27 '16 at 0:18
23

The actual problem here is that the this context is not defined in your handleChangeOnMonth function. This is caused because of the way that javascript handles the contexts of functions, basically when calling functions if you are not calling them directly from the object, and they are not bound they will not have a defined context, and since you are passing the function as a parameter to the input component, it loses the context.

The simplest way to fix this is to bind the function, I suggest that you bind the function in the constructor, like so:

class MonthsTable extends Component {
  constructor(props, context){
    super(props, context);
    this.handleChangeOnMonth = this.handleChangeOnMonth.bind(this);
  }
  handleChangeOnMonth(e){ 
    this.props.setMonth(e.target.id, e.target.value);
  }
  render(){
    return (<form>
      {this.props.months.map((e, i) =>
         <input
          type='number'
          id={i} 
          key={i} 
          value={this.props.months[i]}
          onChange={this.handleChangeOnMonth} />)}
    </form>)
  }
}

alternatively if you are using decorators you could use the core-decorators package to do this in a more elegant way:

import {autobind} from "core-decorators"

@autobind
class MonthsTable extends Component {     
  handleChangeOnMonth(e){ 
    this.props.setMonth(e.target.id, e.target.value);
  }
  render(){
    return (<form>
      {this.props.months.map((e, i) =>
         <input
          type='number'
          id={i} 
          key={i} 
          value={this.props.months[i]}
          onChange={this.handleChangeOnMonth} />)}
    </form>)
  }
}
1

You have to bind your function that is supplied to onChange to the current context. You can bind it at the constructor of the class or you can bind it directly to the onChange() which is not good practice, though.

class MonthsTable extends Component {
  constructor(props){
    super(props);
    this.handleChangeOnMonth = this.handleChangeOnMonth.bind(this);
  }
  handleChangeOnMonth(e){ 
    this.props.setMonth(e.target.id, e.target.value); // here the method is not found, causing error.
  }
  render(){
    console.log(this.props.setMonth) // here the method is present alright
    return (<form>
      {this.props.months.map((e, i) =>
         <input
          type='number'
          id={i} 
          key={i} // yes I know, bad habit, but in this case it doesn't matter
          value={this.props.months[i]}
          onChange={this.handleChangeOnMonth.bind(this)} />)}
    </form>)
  }
}
1
  • Why you just copied and pasted the answer someone else gave before you? Jul 2 '20 at 5:59
0

If you don't want to bind every function you wrote. You can use ES6 arrow functions. This works because arrow functions don't have their own this, so they inherit the class's this. You can read more about Lexical scoping, the mechanism behind the scenes, here. This solution actually appears in the docs.

handleChangeOnMonth = (e) => { 
  this.props.setMonth(e.target.id, e.target.value);
}
2
  • Your answer could be improved with additional supporting information. Please edit to add further details, such as citations or documentation, so that others can confirm that your answer is correct. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Community Bot
    Sep 26 at 14:48
  • This answer is technically correct. Arrow functions have lexical scope. However, the original question is querying about context (this) not scoping. This answer has a lot of potential to connect the dots between answers focused on context, which are accepted and this solution, which addresses how the context of this changes to be lexical in arrow functions. Reference: stackoverflow.com/questions/14328519/…
    – gtzilla
    Sep 26 at 15:03

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