1

Following is my code, when I enter "carol chen", I expect it will print out 9 characters, but it print out 10.

The name you enter is: carol chen

The number of characters in the user's name is 10

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(){

char *name;
int i;
int n = 0;

name= (char *)calloc(80, sizeof(char));

if(name == NULL) {

    printf("\nOut of memory!\n");
    return 1;
}
else {

    printf("The name you enter is: ");
    scanf("%79[0-9a-zA-Z ]", name);

    for(i=0; i<80; i++){

        if(name[i] != 0){

            n += 1;
        }
    }

    printf("\nThe number of characters in the user's name is %d\n", n);

}

free(name);

}
4
  • 4
    +1 for checking the value returned by calloc(). Just scan for 80 characters, i.e. scanf("%80s", name) and then check each character in your loop to see if it's printable. You're almost there.
    – Mick
    Aug 27 '16 at 1:42
  • 2
    There's no point in using calloc() and free() when simply writing char name[80]; would give you as much space with far less overhead. Aug 27 '16 at 4:01
  • @Jonathan That's true, but I want to make Dynamic Memory Allocation, so that I can use realloc() after. Thank you.
    – Yotta Lynn
    Aug 27 '16 at 6:58
  • @MickSharpe: Note that there's an 'off-by-one' design decision in scanf() et al. If your variable is char name[80];, the format string should be "%79s" — you specify the number of characters excluding the trailing null. This is a sad inconsistency with other functions, but was frozen long before the C standard was defined (circa 1979), and changing it would have broken working code. (That's how gets() survived until C11 too — backwards compatibility!) Aug 27 '16 at 7:09
5

Just don't count the spaces by adding an and clause that excludes spaces inside your if condition:

Try this:

if (name[i] != 0 && name[i] != ' ')
{
    n += 1;
}
1
  • Thank you so much, this does make sense.
    – Yotta Lynn
    Aug 27 '16 at 6:55
1

Here is a more efficient version

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int main()
{
        char *name;
        int i;
        int n = 0;

        name= (char *)calloc(80, sizeof(char));

        if(name == NULL) {
            printf("\nOut of memory!\n");
            return 1;
        }
        else {
            printf("The name you enter is: ");
            scanf("%79[0-9a-zA-Z ]", name);
        }

        i = 0;
        while ( (i < 80) && name[i])  {
            if(name[i] != ' ') {
                n += 1;
            }
            i++;
        }
        printf("\nThe number of characters in the user's name is %d\n", n);

        free(name);
}
3
  • 2
    Maybe you should explain why it is more efficient? I guess you're thinking it will stop on reaching the first null byte, rather than scanning 70 of them. You could still use a for loop rather than losing the i++ down at the end of the while. Many C programmers would use n++; in place of n += 1; though the result is the same. Aug 27 '16 at 4:05
  • @Peter Thank you!
    – Yotta Lynn
    Aug 27 '16 at 7:04
  • Jonathan your comments are valid. I quickly modified the code to show Yotta a better way of doing it, rather than going through the whole array. It is not the way I would have written the code. Aug 27 '16 at 7:50

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