3

I am learning programming in C. Could you explain why nothing is printed here? Thanks in advance.

#include <stdio.h>

int main (void)
{
    char a[]="abcde";
    printf ("%s", a);
}   

closed as off-topic by Karoly Horvath, Weather Vane, JJJ, Nisse Engström, Jonathan Leffler Aug 27 '16 at 14:44

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  • Add a "\n" to the string or the format. -->> printf ("%s\n", a); – wildplasser Aug 27 '16 at 11:33
  • 1
    which platform are you using to compile?? I have run it on codeblocks and ideone. it ran fine. – jbsu32 Aug 27 '16 at 11:36
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    You need to return an int from your function – samgak Aug 27 '16 at 11:37
  • 1
    @samgak, this is optional – David Ranieri Aug 27 '16 at 11:39
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    Since you don't end the output with a newline, you may not be seeing it clearly, because it's mixed in with your shell prompt. – Barmar Aug 27 '16 at 11:59
11

On many systems printf is buffered, i.e. when you call printf the output is placed in a buffer instead of being printed immediately. The buffer will be flushed (aka the output printed) when you print a newline \n.

On all systems your program will print despite the missing \n as the buffer is flushed when your program ends.

Typically you would still add the \n like:

printf ("%s\n", a);

An alternative way to get the output immediately is to call fflush to flush the buffer. From the man page:

For output streams, fflush() forces a write of all user-space buffered data for the given output or update stream via the stream's underlying write function.

Source: http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man3/fflush.3.html

EDIT

As pointed out by @Barmar and quoted by @Alter Mann it is required that the buffer is flushed when the program ends.

Quote from @Alter Mann:

If the main function returns to its original caller, or if the exit function is called, all open files are closed (hence all output streams are flushed) before program termination.

See calling main() in main() in c

  • 1
    C systems are required to flush output when the program ends. – Barmar Aug 27 '16 at 11:57
  • @Barmar, good point: If the main function returns to its original caller, or if the exit function is called, all open files are closed (hence all output streams are flushed) before program termination. But in this case there is no call to exit() nor return, could this be what's causing the problem? – David Ranieri Aug 27 '16 at 12:01
  • @AlterMann Running off the end of the function causes it to return to its caller. – Barmar Aug 27 '16 at 12:02
  • @Barmar, yes, return is optional, very strange! – David Ranieri Aug 27 '16 at 12:02
  • I got that from the question you linked to in a comment above. – Barmar Aug 27 '16 at 12:03

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