32

How do I tell group_by to group the data by all columns except a given one?

With aggregate, it would be aggregate(x ~ ., ...).

I tried group_by(data, -x), but that groups by the negative-of-x (i.e. the same as grouping by x).

29

You can do this using standard evaluation (group_by_ instead of group_by):

# Fake data
set.seed(492)
dat = data.frame(value=rnorm(1000), g1=sample(LETTERS,1000,replace=TRUE),
                 g2=sample(letters,1000,replace=TRUE), g3=sample(1:10, replace=TRUE),
                 other=sample(c("red","green","black"),1000,replace=TRUE))

dat %>% group_by_(.dots=names(dat)[-grep("value", names(dat))]) %>%
  summarise(meanValue=mean(value))
       g1     g2    g3  other   meanValue
   <fctr> <fctr> <int> <fctr>       <dbl>
1       A      a     2  green  0.89281475
2       A      b     2    red -0.03558775
3       A      b     5  black -1.79184218
4       A      c    10  black  0.17518610
5       A      e     5  black  0.25830392
...

See this vignette for more on standard vs. non-standard evaluation in dplyr.

UPDATE for dplyr 0.7.0

To address @ÖmerAn's comment: It looks like group_by_at is the way to go in dplyr 0.7.0 (someone please correct me if I'm wrong about this). For example:

dat %>% 
  group_by_at(setdiff(names(dat), "value")) %>%
  summarise(meanValue=mean(value))
# Groups:   g1, g2, g3 [?]
       g1     g2    g3  other   meanValue
   <fctr> <fctr> <int> <fctr>       <dbl>
 1      A      a     2  green  0.89281475
 2      A      b     2    red -0.03558775
 3      A      b     5  black -1.79184218
 4      A      c    10  black  0.17518610
 5      A      e     5  black  0.25830392
 6      A      e     5    red -0.81879788
 7      A      e     7  green  0.30836054
 8      A      f     2  green  0.05537047
 9      A      g     1  black  1.00156405
10      A      g    10  black  1.26884303
# ... with 949 more rows

Let's confirm both methods give the same output (in dplyr 0.7.0):

new = dat %>% 
  group_by_at(setdiff(names(dat), "value")) %>%
  summarise(meanValue=mean(value))

old = dat %>% 
  group_by_(.dots=names(dat)[-grep("value", names(dat))]) %>%
  summarise(meanValue=mean(value))

identical(old, new)
# [1] TRUE
| improve this answer | |
  • 12
    Instead of names(dat)[-grep("value", names(dat))], you can also use setdiff(names(dat), "value") – Jaap Aug 28 '16 at 17:16
  • 2
    Although it's risker, I guess you could even select by position: names(dat)[-1]. We're golfing, right? :) – eipi10 Aug 28 '16 at 17:30
  • Certainly also a valid option :-) – Jaap Aug 28 '16 at 20:23
  • Also, if you want to summarise all columns at once use dplyr::summarise_each(funs(mean)) – Boern Apr 24 '17 at 8:28
  • How to do this in the newest version of dplyr 0.7.0 which claims the SE versions of the verbs are now deprecated? github.com/tidyverse/dplyr/releases – Ömer An Jun 22 '17 at 6:54
34

Building on the @eipi10's dplyr 0.7.0 edit, group_by_at appears to be the right function for this job. However, if you are simply looking to omit column "x", then you can use:

new2.0 <- dat %>%
  group_by_at(vars(-x)) %>%
  summarize(mean_value = mean(value))

Using @eipi10's example data:

# Fake data
set.seed(492)
dat <- data.frame(value = rnorm(1000),
             g1 = sample(LETTERS, 1000, replace = TRUE),
             g2 = sample(letters, 1000, replace = TRUE),
             g3 = sample(1:10, replace = TRUE),
             other = sample(c("red", "green", "black"), 1000, replace = TRUE))

new <- dat %>% 
  group_by_at(names(dat)[-grep("value", names(dat))]) %>%
  summarise(meanValue = mean(value))


new2.0 <- dat %>% 
  group_by_at(vars(-value)) %>% 
  summarize(meanValue = mean(value))

identical(new, new2.0)
# [1] TRUE
| improve this answer | |
24

A small update on this question because I stumbled across this myself and found an elegant solution with current version of dplyr (0.7.4): Inside group_by_at(), you can supply the names of columns the same way as in the select() function using vars(). This enables us to group by everything but one column (hp in this example) by writing:

library(dplyr)
df <- as_tibble(mtcars, rownames = "car")
df %>% group_by_at(vars(-hp))

UPDATE:

With dplyr 1.0.0 coming up, the _at functions are falling into the superseded lifecycle (i.e. while they remain in dplyr for the foreseeable future, there are now better alternatives that are more actively developed). The new way to write above code is via the across function:

df %>%
  group_by(across(c(-hp)))
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    You may even supply several columns to ignore: df %>% group_by_at(vars(-hp, -cyl)) without needing to use the c() construct. Super nice! – Lionel Trebuchon Jun 3 '19 at 13:43

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