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I have created the smallest possible solution in Visual Studio 2015 (C#, WPF) to access an internal class in one assembly from another assembly.

So far, no luck.

MainWindow.xaml.cs

using System.Windows;
using System.Runtime.CompilerServices;

[assembly: InternalsVisibleTo("FriendAssemblyTestLibrary")]

namespace FriendAssemblyTest
{
    public partial class MainWindow : Window
    {
        public MainWindow()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

            GlobalData.Member = "hi";  // this works fine
        }
    }
}

GlobalData.cs

namespace FriendAssemblyTest
{
    internal static class GlobalData
    {
        internal static string Member { get; set; }
    }
}

Class1.cs

namespace FriendAssemblyTestLibrary
{
    public class Class1
    {
        public Class1()
        {
            GlobalData.Member = ""; // this generates: "The name 'GlobalData' does not exist in the current context"
        }
    }
}

The solution is FriendAssemblyTest and it contains 2 projects, FriendAssemblyTest and FriendAssemblyTestLibrary (Class Library).

If needed, the zipped up solution is available for download here: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0Bwmvskxz-sI1TTBzamQ0WEpLTUE

The confusing bit for me was it didn't appear possible in Visual Studio 2015 to set the /out compiler option, but the friend assembly examples seemed to insist that this was required.

I appreciate any help anyone can send my way.

Thank you! Tom

  • 1
    So what goes wrong? You've shown some code, but not told us anything more specific than "this generates an error". (The Class1.cs you've shown us doesn't have a using directive for the FriendAssemblyTest namespace, for one thing - at least, not that you've shown us.) – Jon Skeet Aug 27 '16 at 14:04
  • Sorry I should have included that -- "The name 'GlobalData' does not exist in the current context". – CINCHAPPS Aug 27 '16 at 14:06
  • 1
    This should compile when your Library project references the Test project. However, the name library suggests that is the wrong dependency. – Henk Holterman Aug 27 '16 at 14:08
  • 2
    You need a using <namespace>; or a full name as well. Ctrl+. should help you out. O, and chamge internal to public. This way it can never work. – Henk Holterman Aug 27 '16 at 14:11
  • 1
    That's what I meant with 'the wrong dependency'. You can (should) move GlobalData to a 3rd assembly. – Henk Holterman Aug 27 '16 at 14:30
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Thank you to everyone who responded.

I think I have finally solved the "global variable" dilemma (I'm sure it has been solved many times before :) ).

Nothing super-cool or anything, but very important for anyone wanting a decent starting point to store typed global variables in their solutions.

I created a 3rd project for the global data class and wired it up that way to avoid the circular reference issue.

MainWindow.xaml.cs

using System.Windows;

using FriendAssemblyTestLibrary;

namespace FriendAssemblyTest
{
    public partial class MainWindow : Window
    {
        public MainWindow()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

            GlobalData.GlobalData.Member = "hi";
            GlobalData.GlobalData.TestDecimal = 3.67M;

            var x = new Class1();
        }
    }
}

GlobalData.cs

namespace GlobalData
{
    public static class GlobalData
    {
        public static string Member { get; set; }
        public static decimal TestDecimal { get; set; }
    }
}

Class1.cs

namespace FriendAssemblyTestLibrary
{
    public class Class1
    {
        public Class1()
        {
            GlobalData.GlobalData.Member = "";
            GlobalData.GlobalData.TestDecimal = 7.6M;
        }
    }
}

Here is the solution: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0Bwmvskxz-sI1czVaTzRNUTBKdG8

And just for completeness, here is a URL reference that describes some pros and cons of global variables.

http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?GlobalVariablesAreBad

It seems to be a pretty good resource to me.

  • 3
    Hmya, how many more [InternalsVisibleTo] are you going to add when you are going to use that third assembly in a real program? Maybe it is time to start telling the truth. When it looks like a duck and quacks like a duck and swims like a duck then it is public global duck. – Hans Passant Aug 27 '16 at 14:47
  • Yes, you're absolutely right. I have since removed the [assembly] lines and changed the internal to public. It fulfills my need and makes it cleaner, thanks! – CINCHAPPS Aug 27 '16 at 14:59
  • The main point here is that public global data is an anti pattern. This 'feature' and your solution should be avoided. – Henk Holterman Aug 27 '16 at 15:21
  • That's a matter of opinion Henk. For my purposes, the additional baggage of carrying around a connection string and other loose change adds to the maintenance headache. – CINCHAPPS Aug 27 '16 at 15:28

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