-1

I'm guessing this is a type issue, so maybe you can show me how it is correctly done.

I'm reading command inputs from stdin and I want to quit when the user enters q.

I'm reading a user input from stdin using fgets() into a pointer to a character array. Then I splice off the first word using strtok() and assign it to another pointer to a character array. Then I compare it to a q in order to see if the user wants to quit the program by using the strcmp() function.

Here is some code:

    char *input = (char*)malloc(32 * sizeof(char));
    char *command = (char*)malloc(8 * sizeof(char));

    while (strcmp(command, "q") != 0)
    {
        memset(input, 0, sizeof(input));
        printf("Enter command: ");
        fgets(input, 64, stdin);
        command = strtok(input, " ");
        //if I enter q --> printf("%d", strcmp(command, "q")) == 10
        //if I enter w --> printf("%d", strcmp(command, "q")) == 6
    }

What I want is, if command == q then printf("%d", strcmp(command, "q")) should equal 0 else it should print any other integer.

I should also note that I have verified command is being correctly assigned. In other words, when I enter q, command == "q".

5
  • if your command contains "q" how will it enter the while loop because the condition will be false. – Dark Innocence Aug 27 '16 at 22:13
  • 1) char *input = malloc(64); 2) char *command = ""; 3) //memset(input, 0, 64); 4) command = strtok(input, " \n"); – BLUEPIXY Aug 27 '16 at 22:15
  • 2
    you can't read 64 from stdin, while your input is of 32 bytes. Correct this. – Dark Innocence Aug 27 '16 at 22:17
  • @BLUEPIXY good catch on the size – Kendall Weihe Aug 27 '16 at 22:22
  • And freeing after use is a good habit. – Taha Paksu Aug 27 '16 at 22:43
0

Maybe you can try this code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int main()
{
    char *input = (char*)malloc(32 * sizeof(char));
    char *command = (char*)malloc(8 * sizeof(char));

    while (strcmp(command, "q") != 0)
    {
        memset(input, 0, sizeof(input));
        printf("Enter command: ");
        fgets(input, 64, stdin);
        command = strtok(input, " \n"); // Line corrected.
        //if I enter q --> printf("%d", strcmp(command, "q")) == 10
        //if I enter w --> printf("%d", strcmp(command, "q")) == 6
    }

return 0;

}
4
  • a space has to be the delimiter because the program accepts other commands such as pd 2 4. I thought (char*)malloc(64 * sizeof(char)) might have done it, but still no luck -- still returns 10 and not 0 – Kendall Weihe Aug 27 '16 at 22:25
  • 3
    strtok will split with spaces OR linefeed: it works (although there are useless lines in your code: no need to allocate command + 32/64 size problems) – Jean-François Fabre Aug 27 '16 at 22:37
  • 1
    It's not a good idea to use 64 with fgets() when you allocate 32 with malloc() — it will lead to great unhappiness when you enter more than 31 characters of input. – Jonathan Leffler Aug 27 '16 at 22:57
  • 1.) The code invokes undefined behaviour when 1st executing this line while (strcmp(command, "q") != 0) as the memory command points had not been initialised. 2.) The code leaks the memory allocated here: char *command = (char*)malloc(8 * sizeof(char)); the moment this line command = strtok(input, " \n"); gets execute as the one and only reference to the memory allocated is overwritten and with this it's lost. 3.) All those casts are useless, at least as long you do C and not C++-. – alk Aug 28 '16 at 9:02
0

Several issues here.

  1. The memory allocated here

    char *command = (char*)malloc(8 * sizeof(char));
    

    leaks the moment this line

    command = strtok(input, " ");
    

    gets execute as the one and only reference to the memory allocated gets overwritten and therefore lost.

  2. A possible buffer overflow can occur here

    fgets(input, 64, stdin);
    

    as allowing to read more bytes (64) ito input as it points to be the allocation done here

    char *input = (char*)malloc(32 * sizeof(char));
    
  3. Assuming the data input by the user does not contain a sequence like '[blanks]q ...thencommandget assignedNULL` by this call

    command = strtok(input, " ");
    

    which leads to passing NULL to strcmp() here on testing for next iteration here

    while (strcmp(command, "q") != 0)
    

    Doing so invoke undefined behaviour.

  4. The code misses to check the outcome of relevant function calls, like malloc()`` andfgets()`.

  5. Casting the result of malloc() & friends isn't needed in C nor is it recommended in way. So just do not do it. It might very well hide errors.

  6. sizeof (char) is defined to be 1. No need to use it.

  7. Do not spoil you code with "Magic Numbers"/"Tokens" like 32, 8, 64, "q" ...

  8. Using while-loop conceptionally is the wrong approach if you want to perform a certain action at least once. In such cases use a do-while loop.

Fixing all this might lead to the following code:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>


#define INPUT_BUFFER_SIZE (64)
#define QUIT_STRING "q"


int main(void)
{
  int result = EXIT_SUCCESS; /* Be optimistic. */

  char *input = malloc(INPUT_BUFFER_SIZE * sizeof *input);
  if (NULL == input)
  {
    perror("malloc () failed");
    result = EXIT_FAILURE;
  }
  else
  {
    char *command;

    do 
    {
      printf("Enter command:\n");
      if (NULL == fgets(input, INPUT_BUFFER_SIZE, stdin))
      {
        if (!feof(stdin))
        {
          result = EXIT_FAILURE;
          fprintf(stderr, "fgets() failed.\n");
        } 

        break;
      }

      command = strtok(input, " \n"); 
    } while ((command == NULL) || strcmp(command, QUIT_STRING) != 0);

    if (NULL != command)
    {
      printf("User quit.\n");
    }

    free(input);
  }

  return result;
}

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