0

I have a javascript object that looks like

var obj = {
    p1: {
        name: "name1",
        age: "age1"
    }
    p2: {
        name: "name2",
        age: "age2"
    }
}

I want to be able to access name and age iteratively, meaning something like this:

for (var p in obj) {
    if (obj.hasOwnProperty(p)) {
        func1(p.name);
        func2(p.age);
    }
}

However, p.name is shown as "undefined" in debugger, so are the other keys of p. I wonder if javascript allows users to assign sub-object to a new variable like in Python.

1

I think you're missing something there. Look:

for (var p in obj) {
    if (obj.hasOwnProperty(p)) {
        func1(obj[p].name);
        func2(obj[p].age);
    }
}

This should work.

p only exists as a property of obj so, even inside a for-in loop, you still have to access p as a property of obj (from the loop).

If you're learning javascript, this may not be obvious but there's actually two ways to access object properties: dot notation and the square brackets notation. Using your example, obj.p1.name === obj['p1']['name].

Sometimes you need square brackets notation because you want to pass it some variable, which is what you need inside the for-in loop.

I hope this is clear. If not, you can see it working on this JSBin

1

Your nested object is strictly formatted (has name, age in all nested elements).
Also what's the reason to check that it hasOwnProperty?
You iterate an object by keys and don't know it has iterator key?

Why not just simply iterate the object?

var obj = {
    p1: {
        name: "name1",
        age: "age1"
    },
    p2: {
        name: "name2",
        age: "age2"
    }
};

function func1(value) {
  console.log('Name:', value);  
}

function func2(value) {
  console.log('Age:', value);  
}

for(var i in obj) {
  if(typeof obj[i] != 'object')
    continue;
  console.log('\nOutputing:', i);
  func1(obj[i].name);  
  func2(obj[i].age);
}

6
  • It works. Could you please explain why obj[i].name not obj.i.name? – return 0 Aug 28 '16 at 1:01
  • Because of it's syntax construction. – num8er Aug 28 '16 at 1:02
  • 1
    When You do without [] it cannot pas i as variable that is key to select. – num8er Aug 28 '16 at 1:03
  • In for loop i is key (string) of object that represented as variable when You do obj.i.name js interpreter thinks that You want to get i element of object. But really is that You want to get not i but key that kept in i. It's like i='p1'; so it means: obj[i].name == obj['p1'].name == obj.p1.name – num8er Aug 28 '16 at 1:07
  • 1
    P.s. read the manual: developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… – num8er Aug 28 '16 at 1:24

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