25

In my create script for my database create script looking something like this:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `rabbits`
(
    `id` INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    `name` VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL,
    `main_page_id` INT UNSIGNED COMMENT 'What page is the main one',
    PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
    KEY `main_page_id` (`main_page_id`)
)
ENGINE=InnoDB;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `rabbit_pages`
(
    `id` INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    `rabbit_id` INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
    `title` VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL,
    `content` TEXT NOT NULL,
    PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
    KEY `rabbit_id` (`rabbit_id`),
    CONSTRAINT `fk_rabbits_pages` FOREIGN KEY (`rabbit_id`) REFERENCES `rabbits` (`id`)
)
ENGINE=InnoDB;

ALTER TABLE `rabbits`
    ADD CONSTRAINT `fk_rabbits_main_page` FOREIGN KEY (`main_page_id`) REFERENCES `rabbit_pages` (`id`);

This runs fine the first time, but if I run it again it fails on the last line there with "Duplicate key on write or update".

Is there a way I can do sort of a ADD CONSTRAINT IF NOT EXISTS or something like that? Like I can do with the CREATE TABLE query?

0

4 Answers 4

31

MariaDB supports this syntax in 10.0.2 or later:

ALTER TABLE `rabbits`
ADD CONSTRAINT `fk_rabbits_main_page` FOREIGN KEY IF NOT EXISTS
(`main_page_id`) REFERENCES `rabbit_pages` (`id`);
1
  • 3
    Dang, mariadb only.
    – Kzqai
    Aug 7, 2017 at 22:49
29

The FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS is a great tools but if your need to know how to do this without dropping and recreating your tables. You can use a SELECT statement ON information_schema.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS to determine if the foreign key exists:

IF NOT EXISTS (
    SELECT NULL 
    FROM information_schema.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS
    WHERE
        CONSTRAINT_SCHEMA = DATABASE() AND
        CONSTRAINT_NAME   = 'fk_rabbits_main_page' AND
        CONSTRAINT_TYPE   = 'FOREIGN KEY'
)
THEN
    ALTER TABLE `rabbits`
    ADD CONSTRAINT `fk_rabbits_main_page`
    FOREIGN KEY (`main_page_id`)
    REFERENCES `rabbit_pages` (`id`);
END IF
3
  • This is very useful and defensive i like it May 1, 2013 at 14:36
  • 4
    This solution looks like it would work, but generates the following error (if you use it in place of ALTER TABLE in the original SQL statement posted by OP): [ERROR in query 3] You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT NULL FROM information_schema.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS WHERE ' at line 1 [ERROR in query 4] You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'END IF' at line 1
    – jsdalton
    Dec 18, 2014 at 17:06
  • @jsdalton I think this syntax only works inside a stored procedure.
    – seanf
    Sep 25, 2015 at 7:07
22

Interesting question. You may want to disable foreign keys before you call your CREATE TABLE statements and enable them afterwards. This will allow you to define the foreign keys directly in the CREATE TABLE DDL:

Example:

SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS = 0;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `rabbits` (
    `id` INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    `name` VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL,
    `main_page_id` INT UNSIGNED COMMENT 'What page is the main one',
    PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
    KEY `main_page_id` (`main_page_id`),
    CONSTRAINT `fk_rabbits_main_page` FOREIGN KEY (`main_page_id`) REFERENCES `rabbit_pages` (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.04 sec)

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `rabbit_pages` (
    `id` INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    `rabbit_id` INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
    `title` VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL,
    `content` TEXT NOT NULL,
    PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
    KEY `rabbit_id` (`rabbit_id`),
    CONSTRAINT `fk_rabbits_pages` FOREIGN KEY (`rabbit_id`) REFERENCES `rabbits` (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.16 sec)

SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS = 1;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

Test case:

INSERT INTO rabbits (name, main_page_id) VALUES ('bobby', NULL);
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.02 sec)

INSERT INTO rabbit_pages (rabbit_id, title, content) VALUES (1, 'My Main Page', 'Hello');
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)

SELECT * FROM rabbits;
+----+-------+--------------+
| id | name  | main_page_id |
+----+-------+--------------+
|  1 | bobby | NULL         |
+----+-------+--------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

SELECT * FROM rabbit_pages;
+----+-----------+--------------+---------+
| id | rabbit_id | title        | content |
+----+-----------+--------------+---------+
|  1 |         1 | My Main Page | Hello   |
+----+-----------+--------------+---------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

UPDATE rabbits SET main_page_id = 2 WHERE id = 1;
ERROR 1452 (23000): A foreign key constraint fails

UPDATE rabbits SET main_page_id = 1 WHERE id = 1;
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)
Rows matched: 1  Changed: 1  Warnings: 0

UPDATE rabbit_pages SET rabbit_id = 2 WHERE id = 1;
ERROR 1452 (23000): A foreign key constraint fails
4
  • Hm, I thought I had to create table A, create table B with B->A and then add A->B because the constraint would fail if a table does not exist yet... weird... will try this out ASAP :p
    – Svish
    Oct 12, 2010 at 22:23
  • @Svish: It would, unless you have that SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS = 0; at the top. That's the trick. We're then setting it back to 1 at the end. Oct 12, 2010 at 22:25
  • 1
    I'm having this problem too, and I will try to update my script to use FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS. What would happen on an error tough, if I run SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS = 1; with an invalid foreign key?
    – desto
    Jan 28, 2014 at 19:33
  • In all honesty I might create a store procedure that checks if the FK exists from the information schema and adds the constraints only if necessary. Then drop the store procedure.
    – lcardito
    Aug 1, 2018 at 12:14
1

For a non-MariaDB, this worked for me:

SET @dbname = DATABASE();
SET @tablename = "my_table";
SET @constraintname = "my_constraint_name";
SET @columnname = "my_column";
SET @othertablename = "other_table";
SET @othercolumnname = "other_column_name";
SET @deleteaction = "CASCADE";
SET @updateaction = "RESTRICT";
SET @preparedStatement = (SELECT IF(
  (
    SELECT COUNT(*) FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS
    WHERE
      (table_name = @tablename)
      AND (table_schema = @dbname)
      AND (constraint_name = @constraintname)
  ) > 0,
  "SELECT 1",
  CONCAT("ALTER TABLE ",@tablename,
    " ADD CONSTRAINT ",@constraintname,
    " FOREIGN KEY(",@columnname,")
      REFERENCES ",@othertablename,"(",@othercolumnname,")
      ON DELETE ",@deleteaction,
    " ON UPDATE ",@updateaction)));
PREPARE alterIfNotExists FROM @preparedStatement;
EXECUTE alterIfNotExists;
DEALLOCATE PREPARE alterIfNotExists;

This is a solution, is made from a similar problem: https://stackoverflow.com/a/31989541/3589448

Add parameters as needed. @deleteaction and @updateaction can have: "RESTRICT", "CASCADE", "SET NULL" or "NO ACTION".

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