0

I'm confused... What's wrong with this? Couldn't post without changing the title... I seriously don't know what's wrong

$(document).ready(function(){
    $("#fmob").click(function(){
        var mobname = $(this).attr("data-value");
        console.log(mobname);
        $.ajax({
            type: "POST",
            url: "/system/mobproc.php",
            data: {mobname: 1},
            dataType: "json",
            success: function(data){
                if(data.response === true){
                    $("#fresponse").html(data.result);  
                }else{
                    $("#fresponse").html(data.result);
                }
            },
            error:function(jqXHR,textStatus,errorThrown ){
              alert('Exception:'+errorThrown );
           }
        });
    });
});

I looked up here Unexpected end of JSON input from an ajax call

but somehow not what I expected... What's wrong? Thanks.

7
  • JSON requires both sides of a colon to be wrapped in double quotes. ex. "type": "POST"
    – zer00ne
    Commented Aug 29, 2016 at 1:18
  • 1
    Are you jerking me around? Commented Aug 29, 2016 at 1:21
  • How come you think you can send something like that without stringifying the h3ll out of it? No, I wasn't, and JSON doesn't accept functions either so ... there's that.
    – zer00ne
    Commented Aug 29, 2016 at 1:38
  • @zer00ne Because that's how jQuery works. But the OP didn't state their requirements clearly, e.g., that they want the value in mob name to be the key. Commented Aug 29, 2016 at 1:41
  • @StevenDropper You need to post the data actually being sent, how the PHP is processing it, and what you actually want to be sent. If the error is on the server side it's either the request itself, or how it's being handled. If the error is on the client receiving the response you need to show how you're sending the response, and what the response looks like when it gets to the browser. Commented Aug 29, 2016 at 1:44

3 Answers 3

2

Try this approach:

$(document).ready(function(){
    $("#fmob").click(function(){
        var mobname = $(this).attr("data-value");
        console.log(mobname);
        var data = {}; // setup a data object
        data[mobname] = 1; // add the property with the key of the value of the "mobname" variable, with the data of 1 (per question)
        $.ajax({
            type: "POST",
            url: "/system/mobproc.php",
            data: data, // pass the data object as the POST data instead of defining an object inline
            dataType: "json",
            success: function(data){
                if(data.response === true){
                    $("#fresponse").html(data.result);  
                }else{
                    $("#fresponse").html(data.result);
                }
            },
            error:function(jqXHR,textStatus,errorThrown ){
              alert('Exception:'+errorThrown );
           }
        });
    });
});

Note the lines with comments, above.

In this approach, we setup a data object and specify a property using the value of the "mobname" variable, instead of defining the property inline. This allows us to use the dynamic value of the variable as the key for the property.

4
  • @NishanthMatha The difference is that using JSON.parse as a poor-man's way of building a JavaScript object with a dynamic property name is an anti-pattern.
    – user663031
    Commented Aug 29, 2016 at 2:22
  • @NishanthMatha Except that yours calls a method that does string parsing, personally I prefer to leave any string processing out of it but YMMV. Commented Aug 29, 2016 at 2:22
  • @torazaburo anti-pattern?? can you please provide ref for your claim?? Commented Aug 29, 2016 at 2:32
  • For one moment I thought I'll never get an actual answer that works. Thank you. Commented Aug 29, 2016 at 19:51
-1

I guess the problem is with the line: data: {mobname: 1}

As you can't assign a variable name as object property like that... it should be inside a square brackets like this data: {[mobname]: 1}

EDIT: if you aren't using browser supported by ES 2015 you could even do data: JSON.parse('{"'+mobname+'":1}')

EDIT 1 if you want to send the json data as string and convert that on php side you could simply do data: '{"'+mobname+'":1}'

This might cause your ajax call to fail, and might not return a JSON as you're expecting (using the line dattype:JSON);

So removing datatype:JSON can also help you by showing what you're doing wrong

10
  • removing datatype: json would make my php feel bad ;/ Commented Aug 29, 2016 at 0:50
  • @StevenDropper what about changing the line data: {[mobname]: 1} I suggested? Commented Aug 29, 2016 at 0:51
  • @Cᴏʀʏ please don't down vote without complete knowledge Commented Aug 29, 2016 at 0:53
  • data: {[mobname]: 1} turns out to be a syntax Commented Aug 29, 2016 at 0:53
  • @Cᴏʀʏ: Starting with ECMAScript 2015, the object initializer syntax also supports computed property names. That allows you to put an expression in brackets [], that will be computed as the property name. SOURCE: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… Commented Aug 29, 2016 at 0:59
-1

JSON objects are differentiated from standard JavaScript objects by using double quoted in both the key and the value - unless either is an integer.

It is explained in the relevant W3Schools site.

Therefore, in your AJAX request, you have to send a properly formatted JSON object:

$.ajax({
        type: "POST",
        url: "/system/mobproc.php",
        data: {"mobname": 1},              //here's the change
        dataType: "json",
        /* rest of the code */

You can of course pass a variable as well:

var JSON_obj = {"mobname": 1, "othermob": 2, /*rest of the JSON */ };

$.ajax({
        type: "POST",
        url: "/system/mobproc.php",
        data: JSON_obj,              //here's the change
        dataType: "json",
        /* rest of the code */

Again, with properly formatted JSON objects (and with properly included JS script if it's in another file), this should work.

6
  • JQuery is fine with an object parameter. Commented Aug 29, 2016 at 1:46
  • but when i send out data: {"mobname": 1}, isnt it the equivalent of $_POST['mobname'] == true ? Commented Aug 29, 2016 at 1:50
  • @StevenDropper nope it isn't... (bool)$_POST['mobname'] == true is correct or if($_POST['mobname']) is correct or $_POST['mobname'] == 1 is correct or $_POST['mobname'] == '1' is correct ...but NOT $_POST['mobname'] == true Commented Aug 29, 2016 at 1:59
  • @StevenDropper you're confusing things. If you desire to access the sent JSON, do the following int /system/mobproc.php: if ($_POST){ $myData = $_POST['mobname']; }; This is of course only one property, but you can do with the rest in a similar fashion. At least, this code worked for me in my php code prototype. Commented Aug 29, 2016 at 2:11
  • You're missing the point. He doesn't want to send an object with the property mobname; he wants to send an object with the property name given by the value of the variable mobname.
    – user663031
    Commented Aug 29, 2016 at 2:36

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.