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Is there a way to include multiple conditions in a guard statement of Swift? For example if i want to check two optionals values are nil using guard how should i do it using single guard statement?

  • 6
    separated with comma – Willjay Aug 29 '16 at 4:47
63

// Check this code

func demo(){

    var str = [String: String]()

    str["status"] = "blue"
    str["asd"] = nil

    guard let var2 = str["asd"], let var1 = str["status"]
    else
    {
        print("asdsfddffgdfgdfga")
        return
    }
    print("asdasdasd")
}

// Guard will check one by one condition. if first is true then it will check next otherwise it will executes else part

  • Can you explain why this renders "asdsfddffgdfgdfga" in case str["asd"] is not nil? – decades Oct 24 '17 at 17:52
  • 13
    This is more like a "AND" condition since comma is used. Just curious - Is there a solution for "OR" condition? – Prabhav Dec 19 '17 at 9:32
  • 1
    I think making a solution for OR defeats the purpose of guard statement – Nareshkumar Oct 3 '18 at 1:37
  • In the above example, you could model the "or" solution by writing guard let var = str["asd"] ?? str["status"]. But in general, if the types are different, you can't model an "or" condition in a guard. – Connor Dec 9 '18 at 14:19
1

To answer Prabhav's question, yes, you are correct, each condition in a guard statement must be true in order to proceed (i.e., not go into the else block). In this sense, it is indeed like separating conditions with AND logic.

You can implement OR logic, not by using commas, but by using a Boolean condition:

guard
    true || false    // this guard statement evaluates to true
else
    {
    print("no, not all values in the guard were true")
    return
    }

print("yes, all of the values in the guard were true")  // this is printed

or a combination of OR and AND logic, by using a combination of Boolean conditions and optional bindings:

let testString: String? = nil

guard
    true || false,
    let x = testString,    // this guard statement evaluates to false
    true
else
    {
    print("no, not all values in the guard were true")  // this is printed
    return
    }

print("yes, all of the values in the guard were true")

This summary from Apple, written about optional bindings in if statements is equally applicable to guard statements:

You can include as many optional bindings and Boolean conditions in a single if statement as you need to, separated by commas. If any of the values in the optional bindings are nil or any Boolean condition evaluates to false, the whole if statement’s condition is considered to be false. The following if statements are equivalent:

if let firstNumber = Int("4"), let secondNumber = Int("42"),
    firstNumber < secondNumber && secondNumber < 100
    {
    print("\(firstNumber) < \(secondNumber) < 100")
    } // Prints "4 < 42 < 100"

if let firstNumber = Int("4")
    {
    if let secondNumber = Int("42")
        {
        if firstNumber < secondNumber && secondNumber < 100
            {
            print("\(firstNumber) < \(secondNumber) < 100")
            }
        }
    } // Prints "4 < 42 < 100"

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