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I have a 3 ways frequency table, I want to combine them into a list, normally I write listOfTable <- list(table[,,1],table[,,2],table[,,3],table[,,4],table[,,5]), sometimes my table is really long, there is any way I can apply lapply to combine as a list without doing manually.

df <- data.frame(ID = c(rep(c("A","B","C"),5)),
             N = c(rep(c("1","2","3"),5)),
             M = c(rep(1,3),rep(2,3),rep(3,3),rep(4,3),rep(5,3)))
applyAlist <- table(df$ID,df$N,df$M)
listOfTable <- list(applyAlist[,,1],applyAlist[,,2],applyAlist[,,3],applyAlist[,,4],applyAlist[,,5])
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    sapply(1:5, function(i) list(table[,,i])) FYI, data.table has nothing to do with table (I removed the tag) – Sotos Aug 29 '16 at 6:45
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    @Sotos, that's quick thanks a lot – BIN Aug 29 '16 at 6:47
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    Or you can use lapply i.e. lapply(1:5, function(i) applyAlist[,,i]) – akrun Aug 29 '16 at 6:48
  • @akrun, so when we use lapply, not use list() – BIN Aug 29 '16 at 6:52
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    If you are planning on using data.table methods then you should realize that the applyAlist object has 3 dimensions and data.tables only have 2. You should indicate how you expect to deal with that concern ... as a separate question. – 42- Aug 29 '16 at 6:59
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We can do this with lapply by looping through the sequence of the third dimension and subsetting the 'applyAlist' based on the sequence.

lapply(seq(dim(applyAlist)[3]), function(i) applyAlist[,,i])

As the OP wants a list output, lapply always gives that output. With sapply, the default option is simplify = TRUE so it would return a matrix or vector when the length of the elements are the same in case we did not change the option to simplify = FALSE. In cases where the list elements are of different classes, this will become more noticeable and is damaging.

lst <- list(a = 1:3, b = rep(letters[1:3], 2), c = 2:4)
lapply(lst, unique)
#$a
#[1] 1 2 3

#$b
#[1] "a" "b" "c"

#$c
#[1] 2 3 4

sapply(lst, unique)
#      a   b   c  
#[1,] "1" "a" "2"
#[2,] "2" "b" "3"
#[3,] "3" "c" "4"

but,

sapply(lst, unique, simplify = FALSE)
#$a
#[1] 1 2 3

#$b
#[1] "a" "b" "c"

#$c
#[1] 2 3 4

gives similar results as lapply as we changed the simplify

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The most obvious way to do it,

sapply(1:5, function(i) list(applyAlist[,,i]))
  • Except his code doesn't create an object named table. – 42- Aug 29 '16 at 6:53

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