62

I want to round up double to int.

Eg,

double a=0.4, b=0.5;

I want to change them both to integer.

so that

int aa=0, bb=1;

aa is from a and bb is from b.

Any formula to do that?

  • 5
    What do you want to happen if the double is outside the range of int? – Eric Lippert Oct 13 '10 at 5:03
165

Use Math.Ceiling to round up

Math.Ceiling(0.5); // 1

Use Math.Round to just round

Math.Round(0.5, MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero); // 1

And Math.Floor to round down

Math.Floor(0.5); // 0
  • You need to do more work with Math.Round. It provides an enum (MidpointRounding) to specify the behaviour accurately. – jnielsen Oct 13 '10 at 3:42
  • @jnielsen: Thanks for pointing that and for the code example. I've corrected it. – BrunoLM Oct 13 '10 at 3:44
  • The simplest and effective way is Math.Ceiling – yopez83 Sep 7 '18 at 19:45
15

Check out Math.Round. You can then cast the result to an int.

5

The .NET framework uses banker's rounding in Math.Round by default. You should use this overload:

Math.Round(0.5d, MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero)  //1
Math.Round(0.4d, MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero)  //0
3

Use a function in place of MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero:

myRound(1.11125,4)

Answer:- 1.1114

public static Double myRound(Double Value, int places = 1000)
{
    Double myvalue = (Double)Value;
    if (places == 1000)
    {
        if (myvalue - (int)myvalue == 0.5)
        {
            myvalue = myvalue + 0.1;
            return (Double)Math.Round(myvalue);
        }
        return (Double)Math.Round(myvalue);
        places = myvalue.ToString().Substring(myvalue.ToString().IndexOf(".") + 1).Length - 1;
    } if ((myvalue * Math.Pow(10, places)) - (int)(myvalue * Math.Pow(10, places)) > 0.49)
    {
        myvalue = (myvalue * Math.Pow(10, places + 1)) + 1;
        myvalue = (myvalue / Math.Pow(10, places + 1));
    }
    return (Double)Math.Round(myvalue, places);
}
  • 2
    This will fail if the current culture uses commas instead of full stops for the decimal point. – Sean Reid Aug 27 '15 at 12:33
3

Math.Round

Rounds a double-precision floating-point value to the nearest integral value.

  • However: "The behavior of this method follows IEEE Standard 754, section 4. This kind of rounding is sometimes called rounding to nearest, or banker's rounding. ..." – user166390 Jan 16 '12 at 4:52
0

Math.Round(0.5) returns zero due to floating point rounding errors, so you'll need to add a rounding error amount to the original value to ensure it doesn't round down, eg.

Console.WriteLine(Math.Round(0.5, 0).ToString()); // outputs 0 (!!)
Console.WriteLine(Math.Round(1.5, 0).ToString()); // outputs 2
Console.WriteLine(Math.Round(0.5 + 0.00000001, 0).ToString()); // outputs 1
Console.WriteLine(Math.Round(1.5 + 0.00000001, 0).ToString()); // outputs 2
Console.ReadKey();
  • it doesn't matter for me..i also found out that. – william Oct 13 '10 at 3:36
  • 8
    There's no error. 1/2 can be represented exactly as a double. The docs say, "If the fractional component of a is halfway between two integers, one of which is even and the other odd, then the even number is returned." 0 is the even number. This fudge factor will make numbers like 0.499999995 round wrong. – Matthew Flaschen Oct 13 '10 at 3:37
  • Cheers for the heads-up. I was trying to ensure the OP knew that Round didn't work as simply as others were suggesting. Thankfully the OP now knows to watch out for it, and I have a better understanding of Round myself. =) – Will Oct 13 '10 at 4:10
-2

It is simple. So follow this code.

decimal d = 10.5;
int roundNumber = (int)Math.Floor(d + 0.5);

Result is 11

  • why use Math.Floor when the OP wants to round to nearest? This won't work for negative values – phuclv Apr 20 at 14:42
  • This example only for positive values. – TechnicalKalsa Apr 23 at 4:53
  • you didn't even mentioned that in your question. And the OP didn't say that he's only interested in positive integers. Anyway this is useless because there are already Math.Round – phuclv Apr 23 at 5:00
-2

Another option:

string strVal = "32.11"; // will return 33
// string strVal = "32.00" // returns 32
// string strVal = "32.98" // returns 33

string[] valStr = strVal.Split('.');

int32 leftSide = Convert.ToInt32(valStr[0]);
int32 rightSide = Convert.ToInt32(valStr[1]);

if (rightSide > 0)
    leftSide = leftSide + 1;


return (leftSide);

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