7

In the Elixir repl, iex, when I do an assignment I get the result of the pattern match printed in yellow:

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This is great until the pattern match is long, for example a file:

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...and obviously if it's a large file it a) takes forever (not because of the read time, but to prep for printing the pattern match to screen), and then b) it scrolls for ages.

How can I suppress this behaviour, or limit the size of the pattern matching output?

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  • You can try with File.stream!/3 elixir-lang.org/docs/stable/elixir/File.html#stream!/… options line or byte you want to match – TheAnh Aug 29 '16 at 14:32
  • Okay, then how do I run the entire stream? If I type f = File.stream!("msgfile.txt", [], 1) ]> Stream.run then all it does is give me :ok. – Thomas Browne Aug 29 '16 at 14:38
  • How exactly do you want to limit the size of the pattern matching output? can i have an example? – TheAnh Aug 29 '16 at 14:56
  • Well, I have a large file, and I want to bring the whole thing into a variable. You're suggesting using File.stream! but I don't know how to "run" the entire Stream... can this be done? Or must I use Enum.take? Because with Enum.take I need to know how long the stream is which defeats the purpose. Basically I want to go through the entire file... – Thomas Browne Aug 29 '16 at 15:11
3

How Elixir REPL prints your terms

Elixir REPL by default limits the length of an output to be printed:

iex(16)> Enum.to_list(1..100)
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 
 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 
 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, ...]

You can change that by using the Kernel.inspect/2 function with the :limit option. For example, Kernel.inspect Enum.to_list(1..100), limit: :infinitywill print the whole list.

However, the :limit option does not apply to strings nor charlists and File.read/1 returns a string (UTF-8 encoded binary). But you can still limit the output printed by telling the inspect/2 to treat your string as normal sequence of bytes (just binary):

Kernel.inspect File.read!("a.txt"), limit: 60, binaries: :as_binaries

Going through the entire file with streams

To perform an operation on each line of your file, you could use Enum.each/2 over a Stream and pass it appropriate function:

File.stream!("a.txt") |> Enum.each fn line -> IO.puts line end

This code will simply print each line.

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  • Very comprehensive, but this becomes very verbose every time, or am I missing something? – Thomas Browne Aug 30 '16 at 15:50
  • I'm not sure what you mean exactly but if you're asking whether Kernel.inspect/2 becomes very verbose every time then the answer is no because you can tell it to print 0 items in a given term by using the limit option. But it *does" become very verbose every time when printing binaries as strings and char lists as char lists (i.e. displaying the printable characters). – mentels Aug 31 '16 at 9:53
  • I guess what I'm asking is if this behaviour can be made to become the default, or if I have to type this long string out every time. – Thomas Browne Aug 31 '16 at 10:25
  • 2
    You can use IEx.configure/1 to set it per IEx session or permanently through the ~/.iex.exs file. See here for more details. – mentels Aug 31 '16 at 10:35
  • okay I got this working. So the line is IEx.configure(inspect: [binaries: :as_binaries]) and from there forward it will treat strings as binaries and apply the usual limit on them. This works well and is a good solution I think, even if you then have a slightly less intuitive list of numbers instead of the strings. – Thomas Browne Sep 2 '16 at 9:00
7

I just add another statement (; 0 is a nice short one) to the end of the expression for this which makes iex not print the output of the first expression, and only the last one:

iex(1)> a = Enum.to_list(1..100); 0
0
iex(2)> a
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22,
 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42,
 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, ...]
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1

While @dogbert's answer is the simplest solution, there's another interesting way of suppressing IEx output provided by IEx itself. Just call this function at the end:

IEx.dont_display_result

So, you can do this in IEx:

f = File.read!(my_large_file); IEx.dont_display_result
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