66

I'd like to use dplyr's mutate_at function to apply a function to several columns in a dataframe, where the function inputs the column to which it is directly applied as well as another column in the dataframe.

As a concrete example, I'd look to mutate the following dataframe

# Example input dataframe
df <- data.frame(
    x = c(TRUE, TRUE, FALSE),
    y = c("Hello", "Hola", "Ciao"),
    z = c("World", "ao", "HaOlam")
)

with a mutate_at call that looks similar to this

df %>%
mutate_at(.vars = vars(y, z),
          .funs = ifelse(x, ., NA))

to return a dataframe that looks something like this

# Desired output dataframe
df2 <- data.frame(x = c(TRUE, TRUE, FALSE),
                  y_1 = c("Hello", "Hola", NA),
                  z_1 = c("World", "ao", NA))

The desired mutate_at call would be similar to the following call to mutate:

df %>%
   mutate(y_1 = ifelse(x, y, NA),
          z_1 = ifelse(x, z, NA))

I know that this can be done in base R in several ways, but I would specifically like to accomplish this goal using dplyr's mutate_at function for the sake of readability, interfacing with databases, etc.

Below are some similar questions asked on stackoverflow which do not address the question I posed here:

adding multiple columns in a dplyr mutate call

dplyr::mutate to add multiple values

Use of column inside sum() function using dplyr's mutate() function

2
  • 18
    df %>% mutate_at(vars(y, z), funs(ifelse(x, ., NA)))
    – eipi10
    Aug 29, 2016 at 15:35
  • @eipi10 Ah, ok. So the above code would've worked if I had actually wrapped ifelse(x, ., NA) in a call to funs(). Thank you! I've checked your solution and that works perfectly. Your solution is exactly what I was looking for!
    – bschneidr
    Aug 29, 2016 at 15:43

2 Answers 2

73

This was answered by @eipi10 in @eipi10's comment on the question, but I'm writing it here for posterity.

The solution here is to use:

df %>%
   mutate_at(.vars = vars(y, z),
             .funs = list(~ ifelse(x, ., NA)))

You can also use the new across() function with mutate(), like so:

df %>%
   mutate(across(c(y, z), ~ ifelse(x, ., NA)))

The use of the formula operator (as in ~ ifelse(...)) here indicates that ifelse(x, ., NA) is an anonymous function that is being defined within the call to mutate_at().

This works similarly to defining the function outside of the call to mutate_at(), like so:

temp_fn <- function(input) ifelse(test = df[["x"]],
                                  yes = input,
                                  no = NA)

df %>%
   mutate_at(.vars = vars(y, z),
             .funs = temp_fn)

Note on syntax changes in dplyr: Prior to dplyr version 0.8.0, you would simply write .funs = funs(ifelse(x, . , NA)), but the funs() function is being deprecated and will soon be removed from dplyr.

4
  • "The use of funs() here indicates that ifelse(x, ., NA) is an anonymous function" ---- How does funs() differ from the traditional anonymous function, function(x)?
    – coip
    Sep 12, 2018 at 22:30
  • 1
    The most notable thing in my experience is that it requires less typing and is similarly readable. However, it also allows you to provide a list of anonymous functions (e.g. funs(avg = mean(.), total = sum(., na.rm = TRUE)). See rdocumentation.org/packages/dplyr/versions/0.7.6/topics/funs.
    – bschneidr
    Sep 14, 2018 at 2:45
  • The example with the function defined outside mutate would only work if df has not changed between when the function is defined and used. This seems like a risky strategy. What if, for example, someone groups the data first?
    – randy
    Jul 2, 2021 at 23:58
  • Agreed, I wouldn't recommend doing that. That example is given just to help with explaining how the actual solutions work.
    – bschneidr
    Jul 9, 2021 at 20:44
19

To supplement the previous response, if you wanted mutate_at() to add new variables (instead of replacing), with names such as z_1 and y_1 as in the original question, you just need to:

  • dplyr >=1 with across(): add .names="{.col}_1", or alternatively use list('1'=~ifelse(x, ., NA) (back ticks!)
  • dplyr [0.8, 1[: use list('1'=~ifelse(x, ., NA)
  • dplyr <0.8: use funs('1'=ifelse(x, ., NA)
library(tidyverse)

df <- data.frame(
  x = c(TRUE, TRUE, FALSE),
  y = c("Hello", "Hola", "Ciao"),
  z = c("World", "ao", "HaOlam")
)

## Version >=1
df %>%
  mutate(across(c(y, z), 
                list(~ifelse(x, ., NA)),
                .names="{.col}_1"))
#>       x     y      z   y_1   z_1
#> 1  TRUE Hello  World Hello World
#> 2  TRUE  Hola     ao  Hola    ao
#> 3 FALSE  Ciao HaOlam  <NA>  <NA>


## 0.8 - <1
df %>%
  mutate_at(.vars = vars(y, z),
            .funs = list(`1`=~ifelse(x, ., NA)))
#>       x     y      z   y_1   z_1
#> 1  TRUE Hello  World Hello World
#> 2  TRUE  Hola     ao  Hola    ao
#> 3 FALSE  Ciao HaOlam  <NA>  <NA>

## Before 0.8
df %>%
  mutate_at(.vars = vars(y, z),
            .funs = funs(`1`=ifelse(x, ., NA)))
#> Warning: `funs()` is deprecated as of dplyr 0.8.0.
#> Please use a list of either functions or lambdas: 
#> 
#>   # Simple named list: 
#>   list(mean = mean, median = median)
#> 
#>   # Auto named with `tibble::lst()`: 
#>   tibble::lst(mean, median)
#> 
#>   # Using lambdas
#>   list(~ mean(., trim = .2), ~ median(., na.rm = TRUE))
#> This warning is displayed once every 8 hours.
#> Call `lifecycle::last_warnings()` to see where this warning was generated.
#>       x     y      z   y_1   z_1
#> 1  TRUE Hello  World Hello World
#> 2  TRUE  Hola     ao  Hola    ao
#> 3 FALSE  Ciao HaOlam  <NA>  <NA>

Created on 2020-10-03 by the reprex package (v0.3.0)

For more details and tricks, see: Create new variables with mutate_at while keeping the original ones

2
  • And how does this work when the function is defined outside the call to mutate_at?
    – randy
    Jul 3, 2021 at 0:01
  • not sure I get your question @randy, there's no difference if the main function is defined inside our outside (note ifelse is itself defined outside the call)?
    – Matifou
    Jul 4, 2021 at 19:31

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.