9

This is the essence of what I'm trying to do but the 'break' doesn't feed right:

needle = nil
haystacks.each do |haystack|
  needle = haystack.look_for_needle()
  break if needle
end

This is shorter, but it will iterate over every haystack (without looking at least) even though it doesn't need to:

needle = nil
haystacks.each do |haystack|
  needle ||= haystack.look_for_needle()
end

This is a one-liner but (I believe) it is not lazy and so it does unnecessary work:

needle = hackstacks.map{|h| h.look_for_needle()}.detect{|x| !x.nil?}

I feel like there should be a one liner, but I'm not sure it would be:

needle = hackstacks.some_find_each_first_detect_lazy_map_thingee {|h| h.look_for_needle()}
3
  • I think the answers given so far ignore that you have nested lists, right? I think you could improve the question by giving one or two small examples.
    – Felix
    Aug 29 '16 at 20:31
  • have you tried haystacks.detect(&:look_for_needle).look_for_needle. detect will return the first haystack with a needle and the secondary call to look_for_needle will return the Needle (assumption). Not sure how intensive look_for_needle is though. Aug 29 '16 at 20:46
  • Felix - The problem doesn't really have nested lists. It has a list of objects where an expensive operation is performed on each item. engineersmnky - Yes, looking for needle in a haystack is an intensive operation.
    – Rick
    Aug 29 '16 at 21:16
9

With Ruby 2.x lazy enumerators:

needle = haystacks.lazy.map(&:look_for_needle).reject(&:nil?).first

Or:

needle = haystacks.lazy.map(&:look_for_needle).detect { |needle| !needle.nil? }

Or:

needle = haystacks.lazy.map(&:look_for_needle).detect(&:itself)
3
  • I haven't verified it yet, but my gut says that this is what I was looking for.
    – Rick
    Aug 29 '16 at 20:44
  • 1
    Thumbs up for a lesson in lazy enumerators Aug 31 '16 at 7:37
  • 1
    As of 2.7 you can use filter_map to skip the detect/reject step: haystacks.lazy.filter_map(&:look_for_needle).first Oct 18 '21 at 20:28
1
haystack.find &:itself
haystack.index &:itself

Which one do you prefer?

6
  • 1
    he is not looking for nil but rather the first instance where look_for_needle is not nil. Aug 29 '16 at 20:38
  • Oops, my mistake. Corrected. The OP confused me with that needless initialization of needle. Aug 29 '16 at 20:42
  • To clarify, I don't want to return the first haystack that has a needle, I want to return the first needle that I find.
    – Rick
    Aug 29 '16 at 20:42
  • Then #find is your method of choice. Aug 29 '16 at 20:43
  • Nice except that this will return a haystack and not a needle. Also might want to caveat itself as this was not an Object method until 2.2 Aug 29 '16 at 20:43
1

I assume that both find_proverbial_needle_in_a_haystack and look_for_needle return the needle or nil, the latter if no haystack contains the needle.

class Haystack
  def initialize(haystack)
    @haystack = haystack
  end

  # Suppose look_for_needle is defined as follows
  def look_for_needle
    @haystack.include?(:straw) && :straw
  end 
end

def find_proverbial_needle_in_a_haystack(haystacks)
  needle = nil # can be anything
  haystacks.find { |haystack| needle = haystack.look_for_needle } && needle
end

find returns the first haystack for which the block evaluates true, or nil if no needle is found in any haystack.

haystacks = [Haystack.new([:ball, :top]),
             Haystack.new([:fluff, :straw]),
             Haystack.new([:dog, :cat])]
  #=> [#<Haystack:0x007fdaaa0f6860 @haystack=[:ball, :top]>,
  #    #<Haystack:0x007fdaaa0f67e8 @haystack=[:fluff, :straw]>,
  #    #<Haystack:0x007fdaaa0f6590 @haystack=[:dog, :cat]>] 
find_proverbial_needle_in_a_haystack(haystacks)
  #=> :straw 

haystacks = [Haystack.new([:ball, :top]),
             Haystack.new([:fluff, :yellow_stuff]),
             Haystack.new([:dog, :cat])]
  #=> [#<Haystack:0x007fdaaa082f50 @haystack=[:ball, :top]>,
  #    #<Haystack:0x007fdaaa082f00 @haystack=[:fluff, :yellow_stuff]>,
  #    #<Haystack:0x007fdaaa082eb0 @haystack=[:dog, :cat]>]     
find_proverbial_needle_in_a_haystack(haystacks)
  #=> nil
1

For Ruby 2.0 and above, I extended Enumerable with this method:

module Enumerable
  TRUTHY_LAMBDA = lambda {|result| !!result }
  def first_result(detect_result_lambda=TRUTHY_LAMBDA, &block)
    self.lazy.collect(&block).detect {|result| detect_result_lambda.call(result) }
  end
end

With that you could call:

haystacks.first_result {|haystack| haystack.find_needle() }

..and it will return the needle.

If you needed to make sure it was a quilting needle, you could do this:

haystacks.first_result(lambda {|needle| needle&.for_quilting? }) {|haystack| haystack.find_needle() }

or the same code formatted with a do block:

haystacks.first_result(lambda {|needle| needle&.for_quilting? }) do |haystack|
  haystack.find_needle()
end

P.S. - if anyone can tell me how to improve this code to support the following syntax, that would be amazing (I get the error "SyntaxError: both block arg and actual block given" which suggests to me that Ruby is assigning "&:for_quilting?" to the &block rather than the first argument)

haystacks.first_result(&:for_quilting?) {|haystack| haystack.find_needle() }
0

There is a first method which does precisely this.

It takes a block and returns the first match of the block

match = haystacks.first { |x| x.find_needle }

https://ruby-doc.org/core-2.2.0/Array.html#method-i-first

By the way, you can use each or map without too many more keystrokes:

match = haystacks.each { |x| break x if x.find_needle }
match = haystacks.map { |x| break x if x.find_needle }

though isn't really using the correct semantics of each or map, which you'd expect to return an array (each returns the original array and map returns a transformed array)

2
  • If I'm not mistaken, this returns the haystack. I don't want to return the first haystack that has a needle, I want to return the first needle.
    – Rick
    Aug 29 '16 at 20:42
  • you're right - in this case the 'break' approach would work because it exits the loop returning the specified value. tokland's .lazy approach works as well Aug 29 '16 at 20:49

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.