21

I have a gridded dataset, with data available at the following locations:

lon <- seq(-179.75,179.75, by = 0.5)
lat <- seq(-89.75,89.75, by = 0.5)

I would like to find all of the data points that are within 500 km of the location:

mylat <- 47.9625
mylon <- -87.0431

I aim to use the geosphere package in R, but the method I've currently written does not seem very efficient:

require(geosphere)
dd2 <- array(dim = c(length(lon),length(lat)))
for(i in 1:length(lon)){
  for(ii in 1:length(lat)){
    clon <- lon[i]
    clat <- lat[ii]
    dd <- as.numeric(distm(c(mylon, mylat), c(clon, clat), fun = distHaversine))
    dd2[i,ii] <- dd <= 500000
  }
}

Here, I loop through each grid in the data and find if the distance is less than 500 km. I then store a variable with either TRUE or FALSE, which I can then use to average the data (other variable). From this method, I want a matrix with TRUE or FALSE for the locations within 500 km from the lat and lon shown. Is there a more efficient method for doing this?

3
  • have you had a look at the rgeos package? The function gDistance() could solve this problem by returning a matrix with the distances. Afterwards it would only be matrix algebra to find out the distance <=500000
    – loki
    Commented Aug 30, 2016 at 8:34
  • Try outer(lon, lat, Vectorize(function(x, y) distm(c(mylon, mylat), c(x, y), fun = distHaversine)[1, 1] < 500000)), is that fast enough?
    – tonytonov
    Commented Aug 30, 2016 at 8:41
  • @tonytonov that's still to slow for what I need. This function will feed into a more complex code, so needs to be faster
    – Emma Tebbs
    Commented Aug 30, 2016 at 9:05

4 Answers 4

10

Timings:

Comparing @nicola's and my version gives:

Unit: milliseconds

               min         lq      mean     median         uq       max neval
nicola1 184.217002 219.924647 297.60867 299.181854 322.635960 898.52393   100
floo01   61.341560  72.063197  97.20617  80.247810  93.292233 286.99343   100
nicola2   3.992343   4.485847   5.44909   4.870101   5.371644  27.25858   100

My original solution: (IMHO nicola's second version is much cleaner and faster.)

You can do the following (explanation below)

require(geosphere)
my_coord <- c(mylon, mylat)
dd2 <- matrix(FALSE, nrow=length(lon), ncol=length(lat))
outer_loop_state <- 0
for(i in 1:length(lon)){
    coods <- cbind(lon[i], lat)
    dd <- as.numeric(distHaversine(my_coord, coods))
    dd2[i, ] <- dd <= 500000
    if(any(dd2[i, ])){
      outer_loop_state <- 1
    } else {
      if(outer_loop_state == 1){
        break
      }
    }
  }

Explanation:

For the loop i apply the following logic: enter image description here

outer_loop_state is initialized with 0. If a row with at least one raster-point inside the circle is found outer_loop_state is set to 1. Once there are no more points within the circle for a given row i break.

The distm call in @nicola version basically does the same without this trick. So it calculates all rows.

Code for timings:

microbenchmark::microbenchmark(
  {allCoords<-cbind(lon,rep(lat,each=length(lon)))
  res<-matrix(distm(cbind(mylon,mylat),allCoords,fun=distHaversine)<=500000,nrow=length(lon))},
  {my_coord <- c(mylon, mylat)
  dd2 <- matrix(FALSE, nrow=length(lon), ncol=length(lat))
  outer_loop_state <- 0
  for(i in 1:length(lon)){
    coods <- cbind(lon[i], lat)
    dd <- as.numeric(distHaversine(my_coord, coods))
    dd2[i, ] <- dd <= 500000
    if(any(dd2[i, ])){
      outer_loop_state <- 1
    } else {
      if(outer_loop_state == 1){
        break
      }
    }
  }},
  {#intitialize the return
    res<-matrix(FALSE,nrow=length(lon),ncol=length(lat))
    #we find the possible value of longitude that can be closer than 500000
    #How? We calculate the distance between us and points with our same lat 
    longood<-which(distm(c(mylon,mylat),cbind(lon,mylat))<500000)
    #Same for latitude
    latgood<-which(distm(c(mylon,mylat),cbind(mylon,lat))<500000)
    #we build the matrix with only those values to exploit the vectorized
    #nature of distm
    allCoords<-cbind(lon[longood],rep(lat[latgood],each=length(longood)))
    res[longood,latgood]<-distm(c(mylon,mylat),allCoords)<=500000}
)
3
  • Nice answer. Inspired by your trick, I made an edit to exploit both the vectorization and the fact that some points are obviously farther than the threshold (as you showed). This should speed up things considerably.
    – nicola
    Commented Aug 30, 2016 at 12:05
  • @nicola: Your answer is another huge improvement! Thanks for the further improvement.
    – Rentrop
    Commented Aug 30, 2016 at 12:25
  • 1
    @Thank you for the idea. Could you edit your answer to benchmark the new proposed solution? Tx.
    – nicola
    Commented Aug 30, 2016 at 12:33
7

The dist* functions of the geosphere package are vectorized, so you only need to prepare better your inputs. Try this:

#prepare a matrix with coordinates of every position
allCoords<-cbind(lon,rep(lat,each=length(lon)))
#call the dist function and put the result in a matrix
res<-matrix(distm(cbind(mylon,mylat),allCoords,fun=distHaversine)<=500000,nrow=length(lon))
#check the result
identical(res,dd2)
#[1] TRUE

As the @Floo0 answer showed, there is a lot of unnecessary calculations. We can follow another strategy: we first determine the lon and lat range that can be closer than the threshold and then we use only them to calculate the distance:

#initialize the return
res<-matrix(FALSE,nrow=length(lon),ncol=length(lat))
#we find the possible values of longitude that can be closer than 500000
#How? We calculate the distances between us and points with our same lon 
longood<-which(distm(c(mylon,mylat),cbind(lon,mylat))<=500000)
#Same for latitude
latgood<-which(distm(c(mylon,mylat),cbind(mylon,lat))<=500000)
#we build the matrix with only those values to exploit the vectorized
#nature of distm
allCoords<-cbind(lon[longood],rep(lat[latgood],each=length(longood)))
res[longood,latgood]<-distm(c(mylon,mylat),allCoords)<=500000

In this way, you calculate just lg+ln+lg*ln (lg and ln are the length of latgood and longood), i.e. 531 distances, opposed to the 259200 with my previous method.

1

I add below a solution using the spatialrisk package. The key functions in this package are written in C++ (Rcpp), and are therefore very fast.

First, load the data:

mylat <- 47.9625
mylon <- -87.0431

lon <- seq(-179.75,179.75, by = 0.5)
lat <- seq(-89.75,89.75, by = 0.5)
df <- expand.grid(lon = lon, lat = lat)

The function spatialrisk::points_in_circle() calculates the observations within radius from a center point. Note that distances are calculated using the Haversine formula.

Timings for the spatialrisk approach compared to the @Hugh version:

spatialrisk::points_in_circle(df, mylon, mylat, radius = 5e5)

Unit: milliseconds
       expr       min        lq      mean    median        uq       max neval cld 
spatialrisk  3.071897  3.366256  5.224479  4.068124  4.809626  17.24378   100   a 
     hutils 17.507311 20.788525 29.470707 25.061943 31.066139 268.29375   100   b

The result can be easily converted to a matrix.

Have a look at the excellent answer by @philcolbourn on how to test if a point is inside a circle. See: https://stackoverflow.com/a/7227057/5440749

0

Just use hutils::haversine_distance(lat, lon, mylat, mylon) < 500 directly.

If the points are assumed to be a cross join of the given lat and lon, use a cross-join first to obtain them:

library(data.table)
library(hutils)

lon <- seq(-179.75,179.75, by = 0.5)
lat <- seq(-89.75,89.75, by = 0.5)

mylat <- 47.9625
mylon <- -87.0431

Points <- CJ(lon = lon,
             lat = lat)
Points[, dist := haversine_distance(lat, lon, mylat, mylon)]
Points[, sum(dist < 500)]
#> [1] 379

Created on 2019-10-24 by the reprex package (v0.3.0)

It improves on the existing answers by its speed and robustness. In particular, it does not rely on the gridded nature of the data and will work with long vectors of coordinates. Below are timings for 100,000 points

# A tibble: 2 x 14
  expression         min        mean      median         max `itr/sec`  mem_alloc  n_gc n_itr  total_time
  <chr>         <bch:tm>    <bch:tm>    <bch:tm>    <bch:tm>     <dbl>  <bch:byt> <dbl> <int>    <bch:tm>
1 nicola2    39891.120ms 39891.120ms 39891.120ms 39891.120ms    0.0251 8808.632MB     0     1 39891.120ms
2 hutils        15.492ms    15.591ms    15.578ms    15.728ms   64.1       5.722MB     0    33   514.497ms
2
  • Your solution returns 0 points within 500km. The desired result here is 379. A grid should be used.
    – mharinga
    Commented Oct 24, 2019 at 9:26
  • 1
    It returns the correct result. I've edited in a reprex.
    – Hugh
    Commented Oct 24, 2019 at 9:38

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