For example I have a file customers.json which is an array of objects (strictly formed) and it's pretty plain (without nested objects) like this (what is important: it's already include ids):

[
  {
    "id": 23635,
    "name": "Jerry Green",
    "comment": "Imported from facebook."
  },
  {
    "id": 23636,
    "name": "John Wayne",
    "comment": "Imported from facebook."
  }
]

And I want to import them all into my postgres db into a table customers.

I found some pretty difficult ways when I should import it as json-typed column to a table like imported_json and column named data with objects listed there, then to use sql to get these values and insert it into a real table.

But is there a simple way of importing json to postgres with no touching of sql?

  • "with no touching of sql" no. The only way to interact with a relational database that speaks SQL is - well - SQL. – a_horse_with_no_name Aug 30 '16 at 9:59
  • @a_horse_with_no_name oh... I pretty sure then I can simply convert my json to sql query. I will research this :) – Jerry Green Aug 30 '16 at 10:04
up vote 14 down vote accepted

You can feed the JSON into a SQL statement that extracts the information and inserts that into the table. If the JSON attributes have exactly the name as the table columns you can do something like this:

with customer_json (doc) as (
   values 
    ('[
      {
        "id": 23635,
        "name": "Jerry Green",
        "comment": "Imported from facebook."
      },
      {
        "id": 23636,
        "name": "John Wayne",
        "comment": "Imported from facebook."
      }
    ]'::json)
)
insert into customer (id, name, comment)
select p.*
from customer_json l
  cross join lateral json_populate_recordset(null::customer, doc) as p
on conflict (id) do update 
  set name = excluded.name, 
      comment = excluded.comment;

New customers will be inserted, existing ones will be updated. The "magic" part is the json_populate_recordset(null::customer, doc) which generates a relational representation of the JSON objects.


The above assumes a table definition like this:

create table customer 
(
  id        integer primary key,
  name      text not null,
  comment   text
);

If the data is provided as a file, you need to first put that file into some table in the database. Something like this:

create unlogged table customer_import (doc json);

Then upload the file into a single row of that table, e.g. using the \copy command in psql (or whatever your SQL client offers):

\copy customer_import from 'customers.json' ....

Then you can use the above statement, just remove the CTE and use the staging table:

insert into customer (id, name, comment)
select p.*
from customer_import l
  cross join lateral json_populate_recordset(null::customer, doc) as p
on conflict (id) do update 
  set name = excluded.name, 
      comment = excluded.comment;
  • I appreciate your help but I found that I better convert my json to sql (with ruby in my case). And then simply import sql with psql command. It's easier than parsing json objects with sql for me :) Btw thx. – Jerry Green Aug 31 '16 at 15:21

It turns out there's an easy way to import a multi-line JSON object into a JSON column in a postgres database using the command line psql tool, without needing to explicitly embed the JSON into the SQL statement. The technique is documented in the postgresql docs, but it's a bit hidden.

The trick is to load the JSON into a psql variable using backticks. For example, given a multi-line JSON file in /tmp/test.json such as:

{
  "dog": "cat",
  "frog": "frat"
}

We can use the following SQL to load it into a temporary table:

sql> \set content `cat /tmp/test.json`
sql> create temp table t ( j jsonb );
sql> insert into t values (:'content');
sql> select * from t;

which gives the result:

               j                
────────────────────────────────
 {"dog": "cat", "frog": "frat"}
(1 row)

You can also perform operations on the data directly:

sql> select :'content'::jsonb -> 'dog';
 ?column? 
──────────
 "cat"
(1 row)

Under the covers this is just embedding the JSON in the SQL, but it's a lot neater to let psql perform the interpolation itself.

  • 1
    ^ this is gold. Just imported 26000 records into my db in less than 5 minutes. Not a single step took more than a second. – fgblomqvist Feb 9 at 7:17
  • how do I add an index column to the table by extracting a specific field from each json dict? – sds Jul 17 at 15:46
  • I think this will answer your question: stackoverflow.com/questions/17807030/… – Doctor Eval Jul 18 at 23:26

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