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I am wondering about the following situation:

void f(int a, int b) { }

int a(int x) { std::cout << "func a" << std::endl; return 1; }
int b(int x) { std::cout << "func b" << std::endl; return 2; }

int x() { std::cout << "func x" << std::endl; return 3; }
int y() { std::cout << "func y" << std::endl; return 4; }

f(a(x()), b(y()));

After reading http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/eval_order I am still having difficulty to understand whether the following evaluation order is possible:

x() -> y() -> a() -> b()

or that the standard guarantees that a(x()) and b(y()) will be evaluated as units, so to speak.

In other words, is there any possibility this will print

func x
func y
func a
func b

Running this test on GCC 5.4.0 gives the to my mind more logical

func y
func b
func x
func a

but this of course does not tell me anything about what the standard requires. It would be nice to get a reference to the standard.

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    I went ahead and gave a more descriptive title for your question. Feel free to change it if you have any problems with that one. – chris Aug 30 '16 at 23:15
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    Thanks chris and panta rei for the helpful edits. – Moos Hueting Aug 30 '16 at 23:16
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    The evaluation of function arguments is not related to the evaluation of the function. The bit about "evaluated as a unit" only refers to the evaluation of the function - the evaluations of a(...) and b(...) do not interleave. – Kerrek SB Aug 30 '16 at 23:37
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In C++14 and earlier, x -> y -> a -> b is possible. The sequencing relations here are:

  • Call to x is sequenced before call to a.
  • Call to y is sequenced before call to b.
  • Call to a is sequenced before call to f.
  • Call to b is sequenced before call to f.

There are no other restrictions on the order. If you want to enforce some particular ordering then you'll have to break this call up into multiple full-expressions.

In the C++14 standard this intent is clarified by the note [expr.call]/8:

[Note: The evaluations of the postfix expression and of the arguments are all unsequenced relative to one another. All side effects of argument evaluations are sequenced before the function is entered. —end note ]

As noted in comments, the cppreference page lists some more sequencing rules marked as "since C++17". This is based on n4606, the latest published draft for C++17. So it is possible that for C++17, this order will no longer be allowed.

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    +1 This is why we use make_unique<T>(args) instead of new T(args); in the latter case, func(unique_ptr<T>(new T(args)), new unique_ptr<U>(new U(args))) could leak. – GManNickG Aug 30 '16 at 23:16
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    @GManNickG good point, I hadn't considered make_unique from that angle – M.M Aug 30 '16 at 23:16
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    Could you elaborate on these points from the linked Order of evaluation: "evaluations of A and B are indeterminately sequenced: they may be performed in any order but may not overlap: either A will be complete before B, or B will be complete before A. [...] 15) In a function call, value computations and side effects of the initialization of every parameter are indeterminately sequenced with respect to value computations and side effects of any other parameter.". That appears to say that a(x())) and b(y()) can not overlap. – dxiv Aug 30 '16 at 23:21
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    @dxiv in that situation I believe "argument" refers only to the final result of evaluating the argument expression; the "atomic" unit here is the conversion between that result and the parameter which may have a different type to the argument and therefore involve a conversion sequence. – M.M Aug 30 '16 at 23:43
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    Current C++17 wording, which cppreference is based on, is 5.2.2[expr.call]p5 of n4606 – Cubbi Aug 31 '16 at 3:22
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Another way to look at it:

There would be no benefit to evaluating both x and y before commencing evaluation of either a or b. In fact, there would be a penalty. An extra intermediate result would have to be temporarily held somewhere which would either require an additional stack push/pop, or consume an additional CPU register (overuse of which would lead to additional stack operations anyway). While it may be of little or no consequence for the example you provided, more complex cases would reveal the inefficiencies.

The rule could be viewed as laziest possible evaluation i.e. not performing evaluations until needed so as to avoid carrying extra temporary results.

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    Well - there is some benefit: most programming languages do have defined order of evaluation from these sort of expressions, which means fewer surprises (both for new coders and experienced coders), and fewer bugs caused due to order of evaluation differing from what the coder expected. Also it is doubtful whether there is any evidence in practice to support the claims about inefficiencies; see this paper, section 7 conclusions especially – M.M Aug 31 '16 at 1:19
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    I should think that order of expression evaluation would matter only in regard to side-effects, which by "best practice" should be avoided, so nobody gets any surprises no matter the implemented order. – Zenilogix Sep 2 '16 at 23:13
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    @M.M In fact if you see this ({groups.google.com/a/isocpp.org/d/msg/std-discussion/7ylid9Tkgp0/…}) post from a lengthy thread, you'd see a proposal attached that calls for a strict left-to-right order of evaluation. – ForeverLearning Sep 3 '16 at 2:56

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