2

I have entity Reward that gives rewards to a player.

So, when all conditions are met, the method executeReward() is called;

The problem is: implementation can be very very different. For example Reward could be giving money to player, or starting global event, or giving player another quest (unrelated to previous). I.e. I don't know what logic will be executed. How can this be designed? In terms of communication between model and service.

Options I was thinking about:

  1. Create reward service, where different methods would be called from executeReward(RewardService rs) method, but this breaks "model does not know about service".

  2. Orchestrate logic in service layer. But this requires manual mapping, which kills the whole purpose of hierarchy in domain.

Neither seem good option. Is there a good way for doing this?

ps: Reward entity is fetched from DB via hibernate. So complication (potentially) arise due to hibernate not inserting services. That said, entities should normally refrain having services, AFAIK.

  • Currently executeReward is in your Reward model object? I mean what does it do and what is the expected return value after its execution? – maks Sep 2 '16 at 18:31
  • public void executeReward(); – Andrii Plotnikov Sep 2 '16 at 19:07
  • For example reward could be giving money to player, or starting global event, or giving player another quest (unrelated to previous). I.e. I don't know what logic will be executed – Andrii Plotnikov Sep 2 '16 at 19:07
4
+50

Solution 1

I would implement reward logic via Command behavioral design pattern.

E.g. introduce common Reward interface with one execute method and encapsulate various rewards as it's implementations: MoneyReward, QuestReward etc. Each of this specific implementations should gets all needed for execution during it's creation:

class MoneyReward implements Reward {
   MoneyReward(Player gamer, Depository money) {
      ...
   }
   @Override 
   public execute() {
      ...
   }
}
...
class QuestReward implements Reward {
   MoneyReward(Player gamer, Map territory) {
      ...
   }
   @Override 
   public execute() {
      ...
   }
}

After selection of needed Reward entity on a base of your conditions you can simply do reward:

Raward gift = ...
gift.execute();

Solution 2

Alternatively Strategy behavioral design pattern can be used.

E.g. Reward interface may be looked like this

interface Reward {
   void execute(Player gamer);
}

And one of possible implementation is

class MoneyReward implements Reward {
   MoneyReward(Depository money) {
      ...
   }
   @Override 
   public execute(Player gamer) {
      ...
   }
}

What is the differences between MoneyReward command and strategy here?

The command encapsulates all needed for it's execution during creation and can be used once for specific gamer. Every time you want to do reward you need to create MoneyReward command instance.

Opposite MoneyReward strategy encapsulates only common services needed for making reword among all players. MoneyReward strategy may be created once (e.g. like Spring singleton) and reused during all application lifetime.

Note: in the both solutions Depository, Map, Player should be small well defined interfaces not breaking Single Responsibility Principle.

  • I made such a stupid blunder :( my object are instantiated with hibernate, and services are @Service from spring... <-- this was only implicitly implied, sorry for confusion – Andrii Plotnikov Sep 4 '16 at 9:42
  • This might work, but the thing is, how would you give this reward from inside the method? gamer.putMoneyToInventory(money)? or gamer.getInverntory().putMoney(money)? up to this point it's ok, and I will probably accept this answer, since what I've found is that my core-module-model is anemic (all logic is in service layers), which leaves me without both those options. Unfortunatelly i discovered this after puting up bounty... – Andrii Plotnikov Sep 4 '16 at 18:56
  • @Sarief How is your Reward entity from Hibernate looks like? Is it just DTO with some fields? What kind of info do you have in it? – Andriy Kryvtsun Sep 5 '16 at 15:37
  • simply put, it's id with some methods. Now, derived class, has it's own fields (RewardAmount ) and overrides parent's giveReward(player). – Andrii Plotnikov Sep 5 '16 at 15:39

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