31

If you need to cast a generic type parameter to a specific type, we can cast it to a object and do the casting like below:

void SomeMethod(T t)
{
    SomeClass obj2 = (SomeClass)(object)t;
}

Is there a better way to achieve this, rather than casting it to an object and then to a specific type?

Problem:

I have a generic function which accepts a generic type parameter, inside the function based on a type checking I do some operations like below:

    void SomeMethod(T t)
    {
        if (typeof(T).Equals(typeof(TypeA)))
        {
            TypeA = (TypeA)(object)t;
            //Do some operation
        }
        else if (typeof(T).Equals(typeof(TypeB)))
        {
            TypeB = (TypeB)(object)t;
            //Do some operation
        }
    }
3
  • What a clever way of getting the work done with (TypeB)(object)t ! Dec 30, 2021 at 19:35
  • @StephanMøller Casting any value-type to (Object) incurs a boxing penalty. Boxing should be avoided wherever possible, and that technique should not be used in tight-loops, for example, otherwise you'll pay the GC tax soon enough.
    – Dai
    Mar 31 at 2:50
  • "Boxing should be avoided wherever possible" - I primarily do websites. You will NEVER feel this so called "penalty" compared to the network latency. Always remember: context is king. Apr 5 at 6:58

8 Answers 8

35

You can use Convert.ChangeType

SomeClass obj2 = (SomeClass)Convert.ChangeType(t, typeof(SomeClass));

Although, keep in mind that this will throw an exception if a cast is invalid.

6
  • 1
    You'll also need to cast the result (which is an object). Aug 31, 2016 at 11:48
  • yes, that's true, thanks for your input, i'll edit the answer now Aug 31, 2016 at 11:49
  • 1
    How is your answer better than the OP method? In your answer, t is also casted to an object as a parameter of ChangeType, internally it is tested if the object is the correct type and then returned as it is. Aug 31, 2016 at 11:50
  • @MartinMulder did you try if T : struct?
    – Lei Yang
    May 17, 2019 at 1:46
  • 2
    Note that Convert can be WAY slower than a normal type cast since it implies the .net runtime would potentially need to create new types. Also care needs to be taken in AOT environments.
    – hk1ll3r
    Nov 16, 2020 at 19:13
27

Using as:

SomeClass obj2 = t as SomeClass;

This would not throw an exception and t would be null if the cast fails.

I don't really know what you're trying to do, but I hope that you're not missing the point of Generics here.

If your intention is to restrict the method to type SomeClass and descendants:

void SomeMethod(T t)  where T : SomeClass
14

Stumbled across this, and wanted to provide an updated answer for anyone else who found this later. In newer C# versions (8.0 as I write this), pattern matching will allow you to do this in a far more concise way:

void SomeMethod<T>(T t)
{
    switch(t)
    {
        case TypeA a:
            // Do some operation using a.
            Console.WriteLine($"{a} is a TypeA!");
            break;
        case TypeB b:
            // Do some operation using b.
            Console.WriteLine($"{b} is a TypeB!");
            break;
        default:
            // Handle this case.
            Console.WriteLine("I don't know what this type is.");
            break;
    }
}

This will check the type of the object, and if it finds a match will assign it to the indicated variable in one step, which then becomes availabe to use in the body of that case. (You can also do something similar in if statements: if (t is TypeA a) a.DoSomething(); ...)

All that being said, I do agree with the other responses that you should either constrain this as much as possible (void SomeMethod<T>(T t) where T : ISomeInterface {...}) or move the operation into the classes you're testing, if possible.

2
  • I read about this new feature in C#, but I didn't grok how to make use of it. This helps solidify it, and helps me "generalize" my code based on class type. Thanks!!
    – Mmm
    Dec 20, 2021 at 19:01
  • Unfortunately a lot of the cool-looking features in C#, like switch + Type "pattern-matching" is unsuitable when working with unconstrained generic types because it causes boxing.
    – Dai
    Mar 31 at 2:52
13

A better design is to put a constraint on it that is common between type T and the class you want to expect in your method, in this case SomeClass.

class SomeConsumer<T> where T : ISomeClass
{
    void SomeMethod(T t)
    {
        ISomeClass obj2 = (ISomeClass) t;
    }
}

interface ISomeClass{}

class SomeClass : ISomeClass {}

Edit based on edit of Question

That is bad design. Try to move that "operation" into the class itself so the caller does not have to know the type. If that is not possible share more of what is being done, what you want to accomplish though is that you do not have a stack of if/else statements where execution depends on the type of object being passed in to the method.

class SomeConsumer<T> where T : ISomeClass
{
    void SomeMethod(T t)
    {
        ISomeClass obj2 = (ISomeClass) t;
        // execute
        t.Operation();
    }
}

interface ISomeClass{
    void Operation();
}

class SomeClass : ISomeClass {
    public void Operation(){/*execute operation*/}
}
5

You can use as for that case

void SomeMethod(T t)
{
    SomeClass obj2 = t as SomeClass;
}
2

If there is no relation between the input type T and the target types TypeA or TypeB (using parameter contraints), and we are looking purely at the casting-problem, the answer is simple:

No, there is no better way than the method you are using!!!

I do agree with some other people, if you are doing more operations on that object, you might wanna choose a different design.

0

I know this is a late question but here what you can do

A great option is to make your function accept parameter of class object, and do your switch case as you wish

And just do the casting

YourClass = (YourClass) parameterObject;
0

Should that simple hack solve all problems?:

    public static TOut Cast<TOut, TIn>(TIn item) 
    {
        return Enumerable.Cast<TOut>(new[] { item }).First();
    }

Yeah, this way the compiler can't find casting problem and we create objects that makes the GC a little stressed, but its easy to write and understand.

Off course you can go in the implementation on the Cast operator and just copy the bits you need, but my guess is most won't understand the content of the code. So if you need more performance, you can get more, but that should work fine in most scenarios.

1
  • How do you call this method?
    – CodeMan03
    May 24 at 16:13

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