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I need to create a toString method which prints out the coordinates of a certain person in a building, like so:

private void toString() {
    if (level == destination)
        System.out.println(name + id + " on level " + level);
    else
        System.out.println(name + "(" + id + ")" + " on level " + level + " waiting to go to level " + destination);

Unfortunately, java.util.* imports a toString class when used also. It is important that "toString" is the name of the class invoked by the program, or I will not receive marks for this module. Could anyone please help?

See below for the entire object:

import java.util.*;

public class Person {
    private int id;
    private String name;
    private int level;
    private int destination;
    private boolean aboard;

    public Person (int id, String name, int level){
        this.id = id;
        this.name = name;
        this.level = level;
        this.destination = level;
    }

    private void toString(){
        if(level == destination)
        System.out.println(name + id + " on level " + level);

        else
        System.out.println(name + "(" + id + ")" + " on level " + level + " waiting to go to level " + destination);
    }
}

(Note this is only a small part of the overall project).

  • 1
    Every class will invoke it's own toString() method if you overrode it; otherwise it will fall back to the superclass's toString, which is in this case Object - printing out it's class instance reference. In other words, this should be OK - i don't understand what you're asking. – Shark Aug 31 '16 at 8:46
  • Scratch that, i know what you did wrong. – Shark Aug 31 '16 at 8:48
  • 3
    I don't think you can override toString() to return void. – MatheM Aug 31 '16 at 8:49
  • 2
    you also can´t lower the visibility of the inherited methods, so leave it public. – SomeJavaGuy Aug 31 '16 at 8:50
  • 1
    a) toString is not a class, but a method b) the import does absolutely nothing in this case; you're extending java.lang.Object containing a toString method and you cannot change the fact that your class needs to extend Object or a class extending Object; The java.lang package is imported by default BTW. – fabian Aug 31 '16 at 9:11
3

Ok, in order for your class instance to implicitly invoke it's own toString() method, it should look like this:

@Override
public String toString(){
    if(level == destination)
    return name + id + " on level " + level;

    else
    return name + "(" + id + ")" + " on level " + level + " waiting to go to level " + destination;
}

insteasd of invoking System.out.println.

TL;DR - you're not overriding toString() because you changed the method signature from public String toString() to private void toString().

  • Technically he can still invoke System.out.println in the toString method (he shouldn't). It is a school assignment, it can be weird like that. – MatheM Aug 31 '16 at 8:55
  • @MatheM following that logic, his toString() was perfectly fine from the start, rigth? except that it wasn't as it wasn't returning a string. Double printing would've been a different issue though. – Shark Aug 31 '16 at 9:01
  • It wasn't right and it won't compile but his teacher might actually want him to print text from inside toString method. It wouldn't be the craziest thing teachers want students to do. – MatheM Aug 31 '16 at 9:09
  • Then the teacher deserves a downvote for asking him to implement a toString() that prints to stdout instead of strigifying the object... :/ so if you're in the same class with him (since you know what his teacher wants / might have wanted) feel free to tell him that. – Shark Aug 31 '16 at 9:47
2

Your toString method should be public and it would be perfect if it had @Override annotation:

import java.util.*;

public class Person {
    //...
    @Override
    public String toString(){
        if(level == destination)
            return name + id + " on level " + level;

        return name + "(" + id + ")" + " on level " + level + " waiting to go to level " + destination;           
    }
}

Let's introduce you to the topic. In Java we have classes which have fields and methods. In your case Person is a class, it has 5 fields and two methods. One of them is a constructor. Of course you might have more, but it's what you have shown us.

Access modifiers are used to restrict not wanted access. Method toString() must be public because it's declared so in the parent class. private methods can be only called from the inside of a class so from other methods. Same with fields.

You can't import methods from java.util. You import classes. Each class extends Object in Java and Object has methods public String toString(). If you won't override it, your_class.toString() will invoke the default, Object.toString() method.

public String toString(){//somecode} means:

the method is public, it returns String and it's name is toString. If you want to print the toString() value use:

System.out.println(myPerson.toString());

  • fairenough, downvote removed. i fixed my part too – Shark Aug 31 '16 at 9:03
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    "Method toString() must be public as you almost always call it from the outside of class." -- Wrong. It has to be public because it is inherited from Objects public String toString() and visibilty cannot be reduced by derived classes. – Markus Mitterauer Aug 31 '16 at 9:46
  • Thank you for the walk through of all your points. I'm new to programming and appreciate the time you took to step through everything. – Neuw Aug 31 '16 at 10:24
  • @Neuw if this answer was helpful, simply mark it by clicking the gray tick below the score. – xenteros Sep 7 '16 at 19:33
0

You are indeed correct that Objects in java inherit the .toString() method (see here)

The way to override the standard .toString() method from the object is with the Override-Annotation, like this:

@Override
public String toString(){
    // Do something here
}

So currently your code could work, however your .toString() method doesn't override the standard method because of the different return type (void VS String). As long as the return types are different Java doesn't recognize them as the same method.

So changing the return type and adding the @Override annotation should fix your issue!

  • 2
    You cannot use any visibility but public with a overridden toString() method. – fabian Aug 31 '16 at 8:54
  • 1
    This won't compile. – xenteros Aug 31 '16 at 9:13
0

It seems that you spend some time reading on visibility aspects of Java.

Most likely, your teachers don't expect you to implement a private version of toString() - they want you to override the public version that each and any class in Java inherits from java.lang.Object.

class Whatever {
   @Override
   public String toString() { 
     return whatever;
   }
}

And please note: each keyword there has its meaning - you really want to study what @Override is about; and what the difference between private and public is; and of course: toString() methods are supposed to return a string object, they aren't void!

-1

Well this may not answer your question directly but so long as your program is like that, it won't compile. The reason is that you are not allowed to override any java method with weaker privileges. The toString method was declared public on the grandfather at the top java.lang.Object. All java classes automatically inherit it so there is nothing you can do about it except overriding. Now, this method is automatically called whenever you call a print method on an object like this:

System.out.print( MyClass );

What you are expected to do is not to create a new toString() method but to override the existing one. To override a toString() method, you must write thus:

@Override
public String toString()
{
    String message = "Whatever";
    return String.format("What to print.%s", message);
}

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